US: EPA reauthorizes use of "cyanide bombs" to kill wildlife - PressFrom - US
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USEPA reauthorizes use of "cyanide bombs" to kill wildlife

08:00  09 august  2019
08:00  09 august  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

EPA reverses approval for 'cyanide bombs' used to kill wildlife

EPA reverses approval for 'cyanide bombs' used to kill wildlife In a surprising reversal, the Environmental Protection Agency announced on Thursday it is walking back a recent decision to reauthorize use of M-44s, also known as "cyanide bombs," to kill coyotes, foxes, and other wild animals. M-44s are spring-loaded traps filled with sodium cyanide, which Wildlife Services officials use when they kill animals for ranchers and farmers. Last year, the federal agency killed more than 1.5 million animals, with about 6,500 dying because of M-44s. These traps have also killed pets and injured people who stumbled upon them.

reauthorized government officials to use controversial poison devices – dubbed “ cyanide bombs ” by critics – to kill coyotes, foxes and In 2017, Wildlife Services agreed to temporarily halt the use of The Guardian requested comment from the EPA , which was not able to respond by the time this story

WASHINGTON - More than 99.9 percent of people commenting on a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposal to reauthorize sodium cyanide in wildlife - killing devices called M-44s support a ban on these “ cyanide bombs ,” according to an analysis released today.

The Environmental Protection Agency has recently reauthorized the use of controversial chemical traps to kill coyotes, dogs, foxes and other wild animals across the U.S. These "cyanide bombs" are meant to protect livestock although some environmental groups are calling for a nationwide ban and saying they are inhumane.

EPA reauthorizes use of "cyanide bombs" to kill wildlife© AP ap263354345628.jpg

According to a recent interim decision, EPA officials approved the use of M-44 devices, which trap wildlife with bait before releasing sodium cyanide into their mouths, killing them.

The devices "inhumanely and indiscriminately killing thousands of animals every year," the Center for Biological Diversity said in a statement Wednesday. "They have also injured people."

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Dog's Death Spotlights Use of Cyanide ' Bombs ' to Kill Predators. One of the weapons the U.S. government uses to poison predators killed a The statement concluded: “ Wildlife Services provides expert federal leadership to responsibly manage one of our nation's most precious resources—our

use of so-called cyanide bombs to kill wild animals on public lands in Colorado as well as plans to kill dozens of mountain lions and black bears deal was the second of its kind in less than a week and came as controversy mounted about the agency 's use of M-44s, which critics term " cyanide bombs ."

Wildlife Services, the division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture responsible for wildlife management, is authorized to use the devices, as are state agencies in South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, New Mexico and Texas. Wildlife Services kills large numbers of wild animals every year on behalf of farmers and ranchers.

At the end of 2018, the EPA proposed the renewed use of sodium cyanide, allowing time for public comment until March. More than 99.9 percent of comments urged the EPA to ban M-44s, according to an analysis by the Center for Biological Diversity and Western Environmental Law Center.

"The overwhelming majority of comments from the general public, including the more than 20,0000 letters from the write-in campaign, did not support the continued registration of sodium cyanide predacide uses (M-44 devices)," the EPA wrote in its proposal. Opponents sited the dangers to residential areas and ecological concerns.

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Environmental groups are pushing the federal government to ban the use of cyanide bombs Environmental groups argue the cyanide devices could accidentally kill endangered species. Their use was reauthorized after wildlife officers were ordered to deploy them farther from populated

Dog's Death Spotlights Use of Cyanide ' Bombs ' to Kill Predators. One of the weapons the U.S. government uses to poison predators killed a The statement concluded: “ Wildlife Services provides expert federal leadership to responsibly manage one of our nation's most precious resources—our

Instead of discontinuing the use of the devices, the EPA has updated its rules to include some restrictions with the hope of reducing accidents. For example, the devices cannot be placed within 100 feet of a public road or pathway, increased from 50 feet, and elevated warning signs must be placed within 15 feet of each device, decreased from 25 feet.

Perhaps most pertinent, people living within a half-mile of an M-44 placement must be notified. In 2018, a family in Idaho sued the government for more than $150,000 after a cyanide trap near their home injured their son and killed their dog the previous year, bringing national attention to the issue.

Lawsuit filed to stop Washington state from killing wolves

Lawsuit filed to stop Washington state from killing wolves SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — A lawsuit filed Thursday seeks to prevent the state of Washington from killing more wolves from a pack that is preying on cattle. The Maryland-based Center for a Humane Economy filed the suit in King County Superior Court, contending too many wolves have been killed as a way to protect livestock at a single ranch in the Kettle River Range in Ferry County. The center and other conservation groups say it may be time to consider moving the cattle off Colville National Forest grazing lands that are also prime wolf habitat. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife said Wednesday it planned to kill more members of the Old Profanity Territory wolf pack.

Cyanide bombs inhumanely and indiscriminately kill thousands of animals every year. The analysis of public comments was done by the Center for Biological Diversity and the Western Environmental Law Center. Earlier this year, the EPA issued a proposed interim decision renewing sodium cyanide

Protection Agency proposal to reauthorize sodium cyanide in wildlife - killing devices called M-44s support a ban on these “ cyanide bombs Earlier this year, the EPA issued a proposed interim decision renewing sodium cyanide registration for use in M-44s and opened a public comment period.

According to the family, no one with the government told them the poisonous device was near their backyard. The government rejected the claims and asked for the lawsuit to be dismissed, claiming the family's negligence led to the incident.

"Cyanide traps can't be used safely by anyone, anywhere," said Collette Adkins, carnivore conservation director at the Center for Biological Diversity. "While the EPA added some restrictions, these deadly devices have caused too much harm to remain in use. We need a permanent nationwide ban to protect people, pets and imperiled wildlife from this poison."

According to Wildlife Services' data, M-44s killed 6,579 animals in 2018. More than 200 deaths were nontarget animals, including foxes, opossums, raccoons, skunks and a bear.

"In my 25 years working with M-44 victims I've learned that Wildlife Services' agents frequently do not follow the use restrictions," said Brooks Fahy, executive director of Predator Defense. "And warning signs will not prevent more dogs, wild animals and potentially children from being killed. They cannot read them. M-44s are a safety menace and must be banned."

A bear bites a sleeping boy on the face at a campground in Utah.
Utah wildlife officials are searching for a bear that bit a sleeping 13-year-old on the face at a campground in the Moab area. © WFTV/Bob Cross sleepy black bear florida_00001818.jpg The incident happened Friday along the Colorado River in the Dewey Bridge campground, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources said in a Facebook post. "The young man was injured on his right cheek and his right ear and was transported to a hospital for treatment. We are currently working with USDA-Wildlife Services and using dogs and traps in an effort to capture the bear," it said.

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