US: San Francisco, Santa Clara sue over new immigration rules - PressFrom - US
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USSan Francisco, Santa Clara sue over new immigration rules

23:45  13 august  2019
23:45  13 august  2019 Source:   msn.com

13 states file lawsuit over Trump 'public charge' rule

13 states file lawsuit over Trump 'public charge' rule Thirteen states led by Washington Attorney General Robert Ferguson (D) filed a lawsuit Wednesday over the Trump administration's new "public charge" rule.The states are suing the Department of Homeland Security over the new rule that expands the government's ability to deny entry or green cards for legal immigrants based on their use of public services like food stamps and Medicaid. The rule, announced Monday, is set to go into effect on Oct. 15. Wednesday's lawsuit, co-led by Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring, is the first to be filed by states against the rule and the second overall challenge since the government rolled out the rule.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco and Santa Clara counties filed a lawsuit Tuesday challenging the Trump administration's new "public charge" rules to restrict legal immigration.

San Francisco, Santa Clara sue over new immigration rules© Provided by The Associated Press File - In this Jan. 31, 2019, file photo, hundreds of people overflow onto the sidewalk in a line snaking around the block outside a U.S. immigration office with numerous courtrooms in San Francisco. Santa Clara and San Francisco have filed suit against the Trump administration over its new controversial "public charge" rule that restricts legal immigration. This lawsuit is the first after the Department of Homeland Security's announcement Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, that it would deny green cards to migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

The lawsuit is the first after the Department of Homeland Security's announcement Monday that it would deny green cards to migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance.

Immigration protest turns violent in Rhode Island

Immigration protest turns violent in Rhode Island An immigration protest turned violent Thursday night in Rhode Island. Protesters said a correctional officer drove at them at the Wyatt Detention Facility in Central Falls. It happened as the group Never Again Action was trying to block entrances and exits to the Rhode Island facility. They're upset over ICE's treatment of immigrants in the state and the prison's contract with the immigration agency. Some protesters said they were also pepper-sprayed and that one person was hospitalized, A spokesperson for the facility said they have undergone numerous audits, adding that they provide safe, clean and humanitarian conditions.

In a filing , the counties of Santa Clara and San Francisco argued that the rules will worsen the health and well-being of their residents, increase public health risks and financially harm the counties. The rules, the counties argued, would result in a "chilling effect" in which migrants forgo or disenroll from federal public assistance programs to reduce the risk of green card denial. This would mean that the cost of services would shift from federal to state governments.

The counties also argued that the rules undermine Congress' broader system of immigration laws that prioritizes family unification and that the federal government did not sufficiently offer rationale to explain the alleged benefits of the rules or justify its costs.

MLB unveils new look, relaxed social media rules for Players' Weekend

MLB unveils new look, relaxed social media rules for Players' Weekend Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association have revealed the full details and uniforms for the third annual Players' Weekend set for Aug. 23-25. © Jennifer Stewart / Getty Images Sport / GettyAfter the previous two editions featured players decked out in unique, colorful jerseys, the 2019 Players' Weekend will see teams wear monochromatic black or white jerseys, hats, and helmets - the home team for each series had its choice of color - intended to showcase players' unique individual accessories; all players will be allowed to "design, wear, and use creatively colored and decorated equipment" during the week

This rule "makes it easier to unfairly target hard-working, lawful immigrants while sowing fear and confusion in our communities," San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera said in a statement. "This rule forces people to make an impossible choice: their health or a better future for their family. We will all bear the cost of this misguided policy."

Federal law currently requires those seeking to become permanent residents or gain legal status to prove they will not be a burden to the U.S. — a "public charge," in government speak — but the new rules detail a broader range of programs that could disqualify them.

Under the new rules, the Department of Homeland Security has redefined a public charge as someone who is "more likely than not" to receive public benefits for more than 12 months within a 36-month period. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will now weigh whether applicants have received public assistance along with other factors such as education, income and health to determine whether to grant legal status.

Multiple lawsuits were expected. Hours after the rule was published Monday, the Los Angeles-based National Immigration Law Center vowed to sue over what it called am attempt to redefine the legal immigration system to "disenfranchise communities of color and favor the wealthy." Attorneys general in California and New York said they were also prepared to take legal action.

Without legal challenges, the rules would take effect in mid-October.

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Associated Press journalist Sophia Tareen in Chicago contributed to this report.

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