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US5 things you should know about Trump's latest legal immigration crackdown

00:55  14 august  2019
00:55  14 august  2019 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Support for immigration shouldn’t be partisan

Support for immigration shouldn’t be partisan On the evening of July 20 in Washington, D.C., a group of friends and I huddled around our reserved table at the National Press Club. We raised our glasses of wine in celebration of our friend passing the U.S. Citizenship test, finally gaining citizenship after a 10-month process. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); We took turns asking each other questions from the test, seeing if the native-born Americans at the table could answer the questions from memory.

5 things to know about Trump ' s latest immigration crackdownThe new rule penalizes anyone who qualifies for assistance, even if they don't use it. Immigration authorities will assess whether an immigrant might qualify for public assistance programs in the future.

The new rule penalizes anyone who qualifies for assistance, even if they don't use it.

The Trump administration's latest change to federal immigration policy is expected to stop more immigrants from legally settling in the U.S. The new protocol formally rolls out Wednesday. Here's what you need to know about it.

5 things you should know about Trump's latest legal immigration crackdown© Evan Vucci/AP Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli speaks during a briefing at the White House, Aug. 12, 2019, in Washington.

(MORE: Trump administration announces rule that could limit legal immigration)

The new rule penalizes anyone who qualifies for assistance, even if they don't use it.

Trump Rule Targets Legal Immigrants Who Rely on Food Stamps and Other Aid

Trump Rule Targets Legal Immigrants Who Rely on Food Stamps and Other Aid The Trump administration will penalize legal immigrants who rely on public programs, such as food stamps and government-subsidized housing, as part of a sweeping new policy to slow legal immigration into the United States and reduce the number of immigrants who are granted permanent legal status. 

Despite his hard-line rhetoric on immigration , Trump has long spoken favorably about young undocumented immigrants who benefit from the plan. The latest proposal is an indication that the Trump administration wants to step up its hard-line approach, and not go in the other direction.

(MORE: 5 things you should know about Trump ' s latest legal immigration crackdown ). PHOTO: A non-profit group contracted by the government to house unaccompanied migrant kids maintained unsafe and unsanitary conditions at multiple facilities, federal inspectors found and detailed in a new

Immigration authorities will assess whether an immigrant might qualify for public assistance programs in the future. The administration has expanded the definition of those public benefit programs to include Medicaid and food stamps.

Officials with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services evaluate applicants based on a "totality of circumstances," weighing factors like age, health and employment history.

Certain public benefits are exempt from the review process. If an applicant has needed emergency medical assistance, disaster relief or was enrolled in a discounted school lunch program, it will not count against them.

Who does the rule apply to?

USCIS says the rule won't apply to people who currently hold a green card or who are looking to renew their green cards. The rule also carves out exemptions for pregnant women, children, refugees, asylum seekers and certain members of the military.

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5 things to know about mental and physical well-being from Dr. Lucy McBride. After Mr. Trump signed his latest executive action, which cracked down on U. S . visa-holders from seven As a candidate, Trump called for a temporary ban on all Muslim immigration to the U. S . He later shifted

(MORE: 5 things you should know about Trump ' s latest legal immigration crackdown ). “The failure to follow health and safety requirements placed the health and safety of children at risk,” the report added. Southwest Key said it was taking steps to improve its oversight and safeguards at

Otherwise, the rule applies to people looking to come into the U.S. legally, as well as people who have already entered the country legally but are applying to become permanent residents.

The government says that on average about 544,000 people seek green cards each year, and of that amount, about 382,000 are probably going to have to fill out a new special form, called a "declaration of self-sufficiency."

5 things you should know about Trump's latest legal immigration crackdown© Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images, FILE In this Januaruy 22, 2019, file photo, newly sworn-in U.S. citizens celebrate and wave US flags during a naturalization ceremony where 633 immigrants became US citizens,at the Lowell Auditorium, in Lowell, Massachusetts.

People who are in the country legally will be impacted too.

The announced change rattled immigrant communities and could impact U.S. citizen children if parents decide not to use public services out of fear their green card application will be denied.

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Trump wants to make immigration white again On Monday, Emma Lazarus wept. Lazarus, of course, was the poet who celebrated that the United States welcomes the tired, the poor, the huddled masses of other lands. But on Monday, the Trump administration unveiled a new immigration policy that upends that tradition. The poor are no longer welcome. Instead, the immigrants with the best chances at getting past the gatekeepers and settling in America going forward will be rich, credentialed, and white.

The Trump administration released a regulation Monday that could dramatically cut the number of legal immigrants allowed to enter and stay in the US by making it easier to reject green card and visa applications.

Trump ' s latest Twitter tirade lashes at media. Trump warns of violence if GOP loses midterms. Washington (CNN) The Trump administration quietly made it more difficult for immigrants to seek At minimum, they say, the determination should be done by an immigration judge with access to legal

Researchers at the University of California San Diego found immigrants are less likely to seek out necessary medical care after being told about the public charge rule.

With the addition of food stamps as a disqualifying factor on applications, advocates worry about disadvantaged immigrants not having access to basic food.

While people in the country illegally cannot enroll in government programs like food stamps, many families with U.S. citizen children could qualify.

(MORE: Food banks see impact of Trump's immigration policies)

The data on how many people opted not to access benefits because of fear of their immigration status is limited. But a nonpartisan policy group Children's HealthWatch found last fall that SNAP enrollment was already down 10% among immigrant families last year.

Experts say the change complicates and strains an already overburdened immigration process.

Green card applicants will be faced with new paperwork and additional legal hurdles to prove they won't need U.S. public services. USCIS officials reviewing applications will also require additional training to calculate those positive and negative traits.

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President Trump ' s administration pushed on with its attempts to crack down on migration at the border on Monday, defending in court a virtual ban it imposed on asylum seekers and issuing its second order within a week.

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"It's going to really slow things down," said Jeffrey Gorsky, a senior immigration attorney at Berry Appleman & Leiden and former chief legal adviser for visas at the U.S. State Department.

Referencing the Trump administration's attempt to institute a similar policy through the state department, Gorsky said the latest move is another attempt to block immigrants without closing the border.

"They've slowed things down and I think that's been deliberate," he said.

5 things you should know about Trump's latest legal immigration crackdown© Rogelio V. Solis/AP Children of mainly Latino immigrant parents hold signs in support of them and those who were picked up during an immigration raid at a food processing plant, during a protest march to the Madison County Courthouse in Canton, Miss., Aug. 11, 2019.

(MORE: Trump administration to deny more visa applicants who may use public assistance)

The Trump administration will face legal challenges -- again.

Officials in California are expected to sue the administration over the rule shift, saying it wrongfully disqualifies immigrants who meet the legal requirements for citizenship.

"This vile rule is the Trump Administration's latest attack on families and lower income communities of color," California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement. "We will not stand idly by while this Administration targets programs that children and families across our state rely upon."

Congressional Democrats have introduced legislation to block funding to the Department of Homeland Security over the new rule.

Multiple advocacy groups have also promised to take the administration to court, citing both the impact on immigrant communities and what they call a rushed process for implementing the regulation.

"This policy denies a permanent, secure future in this country to anyone who isn't white and wealthy," said Marielena Hincapié, executive director of the National Immigration Law Center.

Much of the administration's immigration agenda has ended up in court. For example, lawsuits have stalled progress on Trump's border wall and created hurdles for the new policy to make asylum seekers wait in Mexico.

ABC's Stephanie Ebbs and Sophie Tatum contributed to this report.

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