US: Abortion front and center as new U.S. Supreme Court term nears - - PressFrom - US
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US Abortion front and center as new U.S. Supreme Court term nears

17:26  20 september  2019
17:26  20 september  2019 Source:   reuters.com

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Prior to joining the Court , Tom Clark served as the Attorney General of the United States from 1945 to 1949. While Attorney General, he led an initiative to reawaken in the Later that year, President Harry S . Truman appointed Clark to the Supreme Court , where he served for 17 years before retiring in 1977.

The Supreme Court closed its term Monday with a sweeping affirmation of abortion rights, striking The U . S . Supreme Court on Monday ruled 5-to-3 to strike down a Texas law that imposed one of the Requirements on clinics to meet ambulatory-surgical- center standards similar to those in Texas

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - With new abortion cases on a fast track to the U.S. Supreme Court, the nine justices will get an opportunity within weeks to take up legal fights over Republican-backed laws that could lead to rulings curbing a woman's ability to obtain the procedure.

a group of people standing in front of a sign posing for the camera: FILE PHOTO: Anti-abortion marchers rally at the Supreme Court during the 46th annual March for Life in Washington© Reuters/Joshua Roberts FILE PHOTO: Anti-abortion marchers rally at the Supreme Court during the 46th annual March for Life in Washington

The big question is not so much whether the court, with its 5-4 conservative majority that includes two justices appointed by President Donald Trump, will take up an appeal that could permit new restrictions on abortion rights, but when it will do so, according to legal experts.

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Reverberations from the U . S . Supreme Court ' s major ruling backing abortion rights were felt on Tuesday as the justices rejected bids by Mississippi and Wisconsin to revive restrictions on abortion doctors matching those struck down in Texas on Monday. Protesters hold signs in front of the U . S

Anti- abortion -rights advocates demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court early Monday. The U . S . Supreme Court has reversed a lower court decision upholding a California law requiring Malicious abortion politics definitely were the motivation behind it, but the case centered on the inappropriate

The court's new nine-month term starts on Oct. 7.

Anti-abortion advocates are hoping the court will chip away at the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that legalized abortion nationwide and recognized a woman's constitutional right to the procedure - or even overturn the landmark decision.

Appeals already are pending in cases challenging the legality of Republican-backed abortion restrictions in Indiana and Louisiana, with legal fights also brewing over laws in other states including an Alabama measure that would effectively ban all abortions.

(For a graphic on abortion laws in United States, see https://graphics.reuters.com/USA-ABORTION-RESTRICTIONS/010092FK33J/index.html)

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Anti- abortion activists celebrated outside the Supreme Court on Tuesday.CreditCreditLeah The court returned the case to the lower courts for another look, but it seemed unlikely that California But the same is true of carrying a child to term and giving birth.” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and

The Supreme Court on Tuesday turned down a challenge to a restrictive Arkansas law that for now will end the use of medication abortions in the state “This dangerous law also immediately ends access to safe, legal abortion at all but one health center in the state,” Laguens said. “If that’ s not an undue

The court is scheduled to discuss the Louisiana and Indiana appeals in private on Oct. 1 and announce within days of that meeting whether it will hear the cases, which could lead to rulings by next June.

Whether the court proceeds quickly on abortion or takes a slower approach could depend upon conservative Chief Justice John Roberts, who has emerged as the court's ideological center amid its rightward shift with Trump's appointment of Neil Gorsuch in 2017 and Brett Kavanaugh in 2018.

"I have to believe they will take one sooner rather than later. It's clear notwithstanding all the decades since Roe v. Wade that there is intense disagreement among Americans," said John Bursch, a lawyer with conservative Christian legal group Alliance Defending Freedom, which opposes abortion.

"Anytime you have that much turmoil in the political process it's going to create conflicts the court must address," Bursch added.

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WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday reaffirmed and strengthened constitutional protections for abortion rights, striking down parts of a restrictive Texas law that could have drastically reduced the number of abortion clinics in the state, leaving them only in the largest metropolitan areas.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court issued its strongest defense of abortion rights in a quarter-century Monday, striking down Texas’ widely replicated rules that sharply Breyer’ s opinion was a rebuke of the appeals court and a vindication for U . S . District Judge Lee Yeakel, who had held a trial

Abortion opponents are hoping the 2018 retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, a conservative who was pivotal in defending abortion rights, has created an opening for more restrictions to secure Supreme Court approval. Kennedy as recently as 2016 cast the decisive vote in blocking strict regulations on abortion clinics and doctors in Texas.

a group of people holding a sign: FILE PHOTO: Abortion rights activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington© Reuters/Kevin Lamarque FILE PHOTO: Abortion rights activists rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington

Trump, who vowed during the 2016 presidential campaign to appoint justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade, appointed Kavanaugh to replace Kennedy.

'NO REASON'

"There should be no reason for the Supreme Court to revisit Roe, but we know this is exactly what some of the states are trying to do and what President Trump was looking for in his Supreme Court nominees," said Jennifer Dalven, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, which is involved in litigation challenging various abortion restrictions.

Broadly speaking, Republican-controlled states have enacted two types of abortion laws: measures that impose burdensome regulations on abortion providers and those that directly seek to ban abortions during the early stages of pregnancy.

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The U . S . Supreme Court on Monday struck down one of the nation' s toughest restrictions on WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court delivered its most significant ruling on abortion in a The divided court , acting on the final day of a term in which the death of Justice Antonin Scalia left it

The Supreme Court stepped over the line in the ruling, they say, finding a constitutional right where there wasn’t one and The fight in Arkansas centers on medication abortions , which currently account for Related Coverage. What It Takes to Get an Abortion in the Most Restrictive U . S . State.

The latter laws in particular directly challenge Roe v. Wade and a subsequent 1992 ruling that upheld it. Those two rulings made clear that women have a constitutional right to obtain an abortion at least up until the point the fetus is viable outside the womb, usually around 24 weeks of gestation or soon after.

The Louisiana law imposes restrictions that abortion providers have said would force them to close. It requires that doctors who perform abortions have a difficult-to-obtain arrangement called "admitting privileges" at a hospital within 30 miles (48 km) of the clinic. The legal issue is similar to the 2016 case in which the court struck down a Texas admitting privileges requirement.

In February, the court on a 5-4 vote prevented the Louisiana law from taking effect while litigation continued, with Roberts joining the court's four liberals. Roberts dissented in the Texas case but his vote in February indicates he may have some doubts about the court reversing course on a precedent it set only three years ago.

The Indiana case involves the state's attempt to revive a Republican-backed law that requires women to undergo an ultrasound at least 18 hours before undergoing an abortion, a requirement critics call medically unnecessary.

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On March 2, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments on the challenge to the Texas law, which requires abortion doctors to be affiliated The second requirement, mandating costly surgical center facilities, has been temporarily stayed by the Supreme Court , but it would force still more

A closely divided Supreme Court struggled with its biggest abortion case in years on Wednesday, with pivotal Justice Anthony Kennedy voicing concerns about a restrictive Texas law yet stopping short of signaling he would strike it down. Protesters demonstrate in front of the U . S . Supreme Court in the

Legal challenges to laws recently enacted in conservative states that directly challenge the Roe precedent by banning abortion outright or in early stages of pregnancy may not reach the court in time for it to act during its coming term.

In addition to the Alabama ban, Kentucky, Ohio, Mississippi, Louisiana and Georgia passed measures that would prohibit abortions after six weeks of pregnancy. Missouri has a similar law that would prohibit abortion after eight weeks. Facing legal challenges, none of the laws has yet taken effect.

Other cases that could reach the court sooner include fights over abortion restrictions in Mississippi, Kentucky and Arkansas that are pending in appeals courts.

Since Kavanaugh joined the Supreme Court last October, it has sent mixed signals on abortion. The court in June declined to hear a bid by Alabama to revive another Republican-backed law that would have effectively banned abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

In May, it refused to consider reinstating Indiana's ban on abortions performed because of fetal disability or the sex or race of the fetus while upholding the state's requirement that fetal remains be buried or cremated after an abortion.

Julie Rikelman, a lawyer at the Center for Reproductive Rights, which supports abortion rights, said the Supreme Court is likely to take up a case on one of the restrictive laws rather than a measure that directly bans abortion, meaning it could avoid having to decide for now on overturning Roe v. Wade.

"What's important for people to know," Rikelman said, "is that even while Roe is the law, there is a great deal of harm that can be done."

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

Witnesses clash in Tennessee abortion wait period trial .
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Expert witnesses on Wednesday presented dueling views of whether Tennessee's 48-hour waiting period before abortion helps or hinders women's decision making. Five of Tennessee's seven abortion clinics are suing in federal court in Nashville over the law, which requires women to make two separate trips to an abortion clinic, first for mandatory counselling and then for the abortion. Testifying for the state Wednesday, Priscilla Coleman, a psychology professor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, said research shows women seeking abortion face "fairly high levels of ambivalence and uncertainty" and a number of them experience sign

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