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US 'I Can't Do This': Imelda Left Texas With at Least 5 Deaths and Historic Rainfall

15:55  21 september  2019
15:55  21 september  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

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Imelda Turns Streets Into Rivers in Eastern Texas . Areas that were hit by Hurricane Harvey in 2017 are now facing heavy rainfall and flooding as Tropical As the remnants of Imelda moved north on Friday, residents in southeast Texas were left to deal with waterlogged homes, blocked roads and flash

When Imelda 's remains moved north on Friday, residents in southeast Texas had to clog up wet houses Roads and houses deal with flash flood At least five people had died, including a man who drowned trying to move his horse. Three others had driven when their vehicles were hit by floods.

Video by CBS News

BEAUMONT, Tex. — The flooding rose as high as Archie Pugh’s wheelchair.

After surging water from Tropical Depression Imelda rushed into his house and up against his wheels, Mr. Pugh, who has a partial leg amputation, could not wait for 911. He perched himself on the arm of a sofa, hoping for help.

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As the remnants of Imelda moved north on Friday, residents in southeast Texas were left to deal with waterlogged homes, blocked roads and flash flooding conditions from a storm that dumped as much as 43 inches of water in some areas to become one of the wettest tropical cyclones in United States

Five people have died as a result of Tropical Storm Imelda , one of the strongest tropical cyclones in U.S. history that submerged the According to multiple reports, all five victims were male and found on either Thursday or Friday. Officials say that one of the deaths included an unidentified man in his

Eventually hauled to safety in a rescue boat, Mr. Pugh and his wife, Elizabeth, left an evacuation shelter near their home in Beaumont, Tex., on Friday, armed with a sleeping cot and a garbage bag full of pillows and blankets. Only two years after Hurricane Harvey, their house was again awash with water — and they were again in need of a place to stay.

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“It’s an experience I never want to go through again,” said Elizabeth Pugh, 49.

As the remnants of Imelda moved north on Friday, residents in southeast Texas were left to deal with waterlogged homes, blocked roads and flash flooding conditions from a storm that dumped as much as 43 inches of water in some areas to become one of the wettest tropical cyclones in United States history.

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• At least five deaths and more than a dozen injuries have been reported in the aftermath of Harvey, the hurricane that tore across the Gulf Coast of Texas over the weekend. • The National Weather Service forecast rainfall of 15 to 25 inches through Friday, with as much as 50 inches in a few areas.

CHINA, Texas (AP) — The slow-churning remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda flooded parts of Texas on Thursday, leaving at least two people dead and rescue crews with boats scrambling to reach stranded drivers and families trapped in their homes during a relentless downpour that drew comparisons to

The storm that had barely earned a name — it was briefly considered a tropical storm before being downgraded to a tropical depression — took many residents by surprise with its relentless rain, rekindling memories from when Hurricane Harvey dropped more than 50 inches of precipitation in some areas and caused dozens of deaths in 2017.

High schooler saves woman and toddler from Imelda flooding

  High schooler saves woman and toddler from Imelda flooding Other Texans used a rope and hammer to rescue a trapped truck driverCities are now submerged under water and some areas are seeing upwards of five feet of rain. At least two deaths have been blamed on the storm, and crews performed more than 1,000 fire rescues – but police and fire rescue teams also had to rely on good-hearted citizens to help others escape danger. Just north of Houston in Aldine, high school football player Jayden Payne jumped into a car to help save a woman and her toddler after she drove her SUV into a ditch with about 15 feet of water.

Rain from Tropical Depression Imelda deluged parts of Texas and Louisiana on Thursday No reports of deaths or injuries related to the storm were immediately reported Thursday. East of Houston, some local officials said the rainfall was causing flooding worse than what happened during

Flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey is overburdening resources as authorities in and around Houston scramble to save those trapped by the high waters.

As the floodwaters rose and receded on Friday, a fuller picture of the devastation began to emerge. At least five people had died, including a man who drowned while trying to move his horse. Three others had been driving when their vehicles got caught in flooding. The authorities also said that a man whose body was found in a ditch outside Houston on Friday had apparently drowned from storm-related flooding, The Associated Press reported.

Across southeastern Texas, highways were shut down, routines were disrupted and people were struggling to get to work. Some, like Charlotte Kinsey, were sick with worry over missing family members.

Ms. Kinsey fled her three-bedroom trailer home in Winnie, Tex., on Thursday afternoon as the floodwaters rose around her and her 3-week-old daughter, Niomi Grace Galley. But she had not heard from her 17-year-old son, Trevor Coffey, who had not been seen since he returned from a job interview late Wednesday. Adding to her concerns, Trevor has a mental health diagnosis that requires medication, she said.

“I don’t know if he’s O.K.,” she said. “And he can’t swim.”

Imelda fallout: Barges strike a bridge near Houston after 400 water rescues and 300 drivers stranded

  Imelda fallout: Barges strike a bridge near Houston after 400 water rescues and 300 drivers stranded The remnants of Imelda will continue weakening Friday as the storm makes its way into northern Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana, but it will continue dumping heavy rain.Flooding on Thursday left some Houston neighborhoods swimming in several feet of water, forcing authorities to perform more than 400 high-water rescues, the Harris County Sheriff's Office said. There were 323 stranded vehicles and 22 major accidents, the office added.

Rain from Tropical Depression Imelda dropped 28 inches of rain on parts of Texas on Thursday, prompting water rescues, a hospital evacuation and road closures. At least one person has died after being electrocuted in floodwaters while trying to rescue his horse from the floodwaters.

Deaths in these places are at least 10 percent higher than the normal level. Note: The weekly allocation of deaths in New York City since March 15, 2020, is an approximation based on how mortality data has lagged in previous weeks this year.

Even being at the shelter reminded her of Trevor: Together they had evacuated to the same shelter in Anahuac, Tex., two years ago.

A man wades out through floodwaters caused by heavy rain spawned by Tropical Depression Imelda inundates the area on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, in Patton Village.

Photo Gallery by Houston Chronicle

“This is Harvey all over again and we barely made it out the last time,” Ms. Kinsey said. “We’re talking about going to my mother’s in Colorado. I can’t do this. I’m not putting my kids through this anymore.”

One possibility for Trevor’s whereabouts had emerged late Thursday: A Greyhound bus had been stranded for hours on flooded Interstate 10, and those inside were on the way to the shelter. But it turned out to be a false lead. Trevor was not on the bus.

Still at the shelter, Ms. Kinsey said in a text message on Friday that her son remained missing.

Rod Carroll, the chief of police in Vidor, Tex., outside Beaumont, was still orchestrating water rescues on Friday from the police station where he had been posted for nearly 36 hours.

Since early Thursday morning, his employees had helped rescue dozens of people in the city of 10,000, and he estimated that a few hundred homes in the area had flooded. His was one of them.

Chief Carroll had been monitoring the radio from bed overnight on Thursday when he heard reports of severe flooding and people trapped in cars. When he got up to report for duty at about 1:30 a.m., he saw that water had started trickling in downstairs. He and his wife hustled to grab photos of their children and knickknacks from his wife’s parents, but soon the first floor was covered in a foot and a half of water.

Volunteers Successfully Rescue Over 50 Horses Stuck in Chest-Deep Texas Floodwaters

  Volunteers Successfully Rescue Over 50 Horses Stuck in Chest-Deep Texas Floodwaters Tropical Storm Imelda left many humans and animals in Houston, Texas, stranded in floodwatersFloods caused by Imelda’s pouring rain left numerous Texans stranded in high waters.

“It came in like a wall,” he said.

They had been through this before, during Harvey, and Chief Carroll estimated it would again take them about 14 months to rebuild.

He has been sleeping on the floor in his office since the storm began, but he briefly stopped home on Friday afternoon to kiss his wife goodbye before she went to stay with their adult children in Beaumont, which also saw heavy flooding.

“I picked out some clean clothes and took a shower, and came back to work,” he said.

Much of southeast Texas — from Houston to Beaumont to rural areas further south — absorbed nine or more inches of rain from Tuesday morning to Thursday night. Areas southwest of Beaumont were hit hardest, with an extraordinary 43 inches near Fannett, Tex. That tally made Imelda the seventh-wettest tropical cyclone on record in the United States, according to the National Weather Service.

In a given year, southeast Texas typically sees about 63 inches of rainfall.

Climate change tends to increase the amount of rainfall during storms because a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture, but scientists must evaluate individual storms after the fact to determine how climate change contributed. (Researchers found that the record rainfall during Harvey was as much as 38 percent higher than would be expected in a world that was not warming.)

Though the rain largely trickled off on Friday, forecasters warned that any amount of additional rainfall could cause flash flooding in an area already saturated.

In Chambers County, a rural area south of Beaumont that was among the hardest hit, a sheriff’s deputy made the rounds in an aging military truck that rumbled through water that was several feet deep. The conditions left other people to walk their bicycles in knee-deep water, or to travel by four-wheeler. Many drove tractors that could get through the muck with their large, durable tires.

Shannon Dye, a longtime resident of Hankamer, Tex., splashed through town on her John Deere tractor. She had to make a delivery.

“Potato soup,” Ms. Dye said, managing a smile. “For my sister.”

Margaret Toal reported from Beaumont, Sarah Mervosh from New York and Mitchell Ferman from Hankamer, Tex. Manny Fernandez contributed reporting from Anahuac, Tex., and Mihir Zaveri and Mariel Padilla from New York.

Margaret Toal reported from Beaumont, Sarah Mervosh from New York and Mitchell Ferman from Hankamer, Tex. Manny Fernandez contributed reporting from Anahuac, Tex.

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