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US U.S. signs asylum deal with Honduras that could force migrants to seek relief there

23:35  25 september  2019
23:35  25 september  2019 Source:   nbcnews.com

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The Trump administration announced an agreement with Honduras that could force migrants to seek protection in one of the most violent nations in The U . S . signed the asylum agreement with Honduras ’ foreign minister of affairs, a senior official with the Department of Homeland Security said

The Trump administration signed an asylum agreement with Honduras that could force asylum -seekers to seek protection in one of the 20, 201901:25Mexico has refused to sign such a deal , although the Trump administration has said it may return migrants who pass through any

The Trump administration signed an asylum agreement with Honduras that could force asylum-seekers to seek protection in one of the most dangerous countries in the world instead of the U.S, the latest agreement with a Central American country aimed at curbing migration at the southern border.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Image: US-IMMIGRATION-JUSTICE-MIGRANTS© Sandy Huffaker Image: US-IMMIGRATION-JUSTICE-MIGRANTS

The U.S. signed the asylum agreement with Honduras' foreign minister of affairs, a senior official with the Department of Homeland Security said during a news teleconference Wednesday afternoon.

The accord would allow the U.S. to send asylum-seekers from the southern border to Honduras to seek relief in a country with one of the highest murder rates in the world.

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Honduras signed a deal with the U . S . government on Wednesday that could push migrants who cross the country on the way to the United States back to seek asylum , in the latest bilateral deal with Central American NEW YORK (Reuters) - Honduras signed a deal with the U . S . government on

The US and Honduras have signed a deal which would allowing Washington to send more asylum -seekers The deal “will allow migrants to seek protection as close to home as possible,” a “We will say it again and again: people cannot be forced to seek safety in countries where they will

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan signed the deal during the United Nations General Assembly in New York, according to DHS.

The deal comes after Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández was targeted by U.S. prosecutors in a major drug trafficking case in August.

The official, who spoke on condition he not be identified, said Wednesday's agreement was parallel to one signed last week with El Salvador and another previously signed with Guatemala. Details on the implementation of the agreements have remained vague and none have gone into effect yet.

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Operation Gatekeeper at 25: Look back at the turning point that transformed the border

  Operation Gatekeeper at 25: Look back at the turning point that transformed the border What emerged was a whole new approach to border enforcement. Operation Gatekeeper was unveiled on Oct. 1, 1994. The strategy was to deter migrants from illegally crossing in the first place — and, for those who remained undeterred, to encourage them to cross in more isolated wilderness areas to the east, where they could be more easily captured.Twenty-five years later, Operation Gatekeeper is still viewed as a major turning point in the effort to control the border.It is considered both a success and a failure, depending on whom you ask.

Mexico has refused to sign such a deal, although the Trump administration has said it may return migrants who pass through any country where they could claim asylum. The Supreme Court recently ruled the administration can go forward with this policy while the issue plays out in lower courts.

The DHS official said that through the agreements, migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. who are in the region and had an opportunity to seek protection in one of those Central American countries will be returned from the U.S. border to seek relief in those countries.

When a migrant arrives at the southern border seeking protection, "they will be given the opportunity to first seek protection in one of those three countries," the official said.

The official said the agreements were intended to help increase asylum and protection capacity in Central America, slow migration and enhance security in the region.

Critics of the agreements have said migrants are already fleeing tremendous violence in those Central American countries and keeping them there could further endanger them as well as keep out those with valid asylum claims. They have also said the countries do not have the capacity in their asylum systems to take on the migrants' claims.

Operation Gatekeeper at 25: Look back at the turning point that transformed the border .
What emerged was a whole new approach to border enforcement. Operation Gatekeeper was unveiled on Oct. 1, 1994. The strategy was to deter migrants from illegally crossing in the first place — and, for those who remained undeterred, to encourage them to cross in more isolated wilderness areas to the east, where they could be more easily captured.Twenty-five years later, Operation Gatekeeper is still viewed as a major turning point in the effort to control the border.It is considered both a success and a failure, depending on whom you ask.

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