•   
  •   
  •   

US ‘Metered’ immigrants face long waits at the border

23:10  05 october  2019
23:10  05 october  2019 Source:   rollcall.com

U.S. signs asylum deal with Honduras that could force migrants to seek relief there

  U.S. signs asylum deal with Honduras that could force migrants to seek relief there The Trump administration announced an agreement with Honduras that could force migrants to seek protection in one of the most violent nations in the world.The U.S. signed the asylum agreement with Honduras' foreign minister of affairs, a senior official with the Department of Homeland Security said during a news teleconference Wednesday afternoon.

A metering list outside the Centro de Información y Asistencia a Mexicanos in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on August 22, 2019. Besides the Migrant Protection Protocols program, U.S. border agencies have a less formal process to regulate the flow of asylum seekers seeking to cross the U.S.-Mexico border

In essence, metering serves as another delaying mechanism keeping migrants in Mexico before they can legally come to the border and claim asylum. But they are all frustrated at the moment while she waits . Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.

Besides the Migrant Protection Protocols program, U.S. border agencies have a less formal process to regulate the flow of asylum seekers seeking to cross the U.S.-Mexico border called “metering.”

a sign on the side of a building: A metering list outside the Centro de Información y Asistencia a Mexicanos in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on August 22, 2019. (Jinitzail Hernández, CQ Roll Call)© Provided by CQ Roll Call, Inc. A metering list outside the Centro de Información y Asistencia a Mexicanos in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on August 22, 2019. (Jinitzail Hernández, CQ Roll Call)

Under this informal policy, Customs and Border Protection determines each day how many people it can process at each port of entry.

In El Paso, for example, CBP officers stand at the middle point of the El Paso-Juarez Port of Entry bridge and turn asylum-seekers away, sending them first to a Mexican government organization called Centro de Información y Asistencia a Mexicanos (CAIM), which provides health care and legal services to migrants and Mexicans.

At the Border, Lawmakers See a Broken System and Little Common Ground

  At the Border, Lawmakers See a Broken System and Little Common Ground EL PASO — The delegation of Democratic lawmakers jostled for space in the cramped room in the border processing center, straining to hear over the sounds of crinkling mylar blankets and a crying baby, as a Venezuelan migrant told her grim story. They listened sympathetically as the woman told of the weeks she would have to spend in Mexico before her next asylum hearing, at which she would try to explain the violence she had faced at home that had forced her to leave.

[‘ Metered ’ immigrants face long waits at the border ]. Knowles no longer screens asylum claims but testified as a representative of numerous union members who still do. “I don’t know a single asylum officer in the country who believes this is a good policy,” he said of MPP, also known as “Remain in

As Donald Trump continues to insist on the need for a border wall, thousands of people from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador have been arriving in Mexico

[DHS advances plan to get DNA samples from immigrant detainees]

At CAIM, migrants get a number and are put on a list. Dirvin García, head of CAIM, said CBP calls them twice a day in the morning and late afternoon and CBP officers tell them how many people they can process on that day. CAIM then goes to its list and tries to notify the people next-in-line that they can cross the border for their asylum hearing.

Slideshow by photo services

U. S.-allied Kurds strike deal to bring Assad’s Syrian troops back into Kurdish areas

  U. S.-allied Kurds strike deal to bring Assad’s Syrian troops back into Kurdish areas The deal between the Syrian Democratic Forces and the government of President Bashar al-Assad further dimmed the prospect of continued U.S. presence in Syria.Hundreds of Islamic State family members escaped a detention camp after Turkish shellfire hit the area, U.S. troops pulled out from another base and Turkish-backed forces consolidated their hold over a vital highway, cutting the main U.S. supply route into Syria.

Since October 2018, 18,500 people have registered with CAIM to wait in line for an asylum hearing in the United States, Garcia said in an interview. The U.S. government, CAIM said, has processed 12,225 on the list and another 6,000 are waiting in la Cuidad de Juarez to be called, as of Aug. 18. That’s in addition to the 48,000 people waiting in Mexico under the Migrant Protection Protocols.

[Read more coverage on this topic at CQ.com — Subscription required. ]

In essence, metering serves as another delaying mechanism keeping migrants in Mexico before they can legally come to the border and claim asylum.

Courtney Collins, 20, a transgender woman from Honduras, is among those delayed by metering. She said she has been waiting for months in a shelter in Juarez to go to the Port of Entry and request asylum, and she’s on the CAIM list.

Collins said since age 14 she has been a victim of sex trafficking and hate crimes in Honduras because she is a black transgender woman. That identification qualifies her for special status population in U.S. eyes, meaning she is not eligible for the MPP program and will most likely wait in a U.S. detention facility as her asylum case is being processed. She spends most of her days inside the shelter, afraid to walk down the street alone because of the prejudice and harassment she experiences from Mexicans and other migrants. She thinks her life could be in danger.

Collins said there are about 600 people ahead of her before she will be called to the Port of Entry to formally request asylum, and expects she will probably have to wait a few more months.

“I have feelings, I have dreams I have a lot of goals that I want to achieve in this world,” she said. But they are all frustrated at the moment while she waits.

Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call on your iPhone.

Syria’s Assad Sends Troops North as Turkish Offensive Escalates .
Syrian government forces began fanning out in the northeast after striking a deal with Kurdish fighters abandoned by their U.S. allies to a Turkish military offensive -- a major shift that could see President Bashar al-Assad cement his impending victory in the country’s long war. Syria’s army deployed in Al Tabqa airbase and Ain Issa and was now stationed six kilometers away from the border with Turkey, according to Syria’s Al Ekhbariyah TV, which showed footage of soldiers carrying Syrian flags being welcomed by local residents.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!