US: The Latest: Alaska justices hear youth climate lawsuit - - PressFrom - US
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US The Latest: Alaska justices hear youth climate lawsuit

03:00  10 october  2019
03:00  10 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

Trump administration rejects new protections for iconic Alaska tree

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a lawsuit that claims state policy on fossil fuels is harming the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate . Twelve Alaska youths in 2017 sued the state, claiming that human-caused greenhouse

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Attorneys for 12 young Alaskans who sued over state climate change policy are expected to argue their case before Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday. The lawsuit says state policy that promotes fossil fuels violates the constitutional right of young Alaskans

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Latest on an Alaska Supreme Court hearing on an appeal involving a climate change lawsuit filed by state youths (all times local):

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2006, file photo, Nathan Weyiouanna's abandoned house at the west end of Shishmaref, Alaska, sits on the beach after sliding off during a fall storm in 2005. Attorneys for 12 young Alaskans who sued over state climate change policy will argue their case before Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The lawsuit says state policy that promotes fossil fuels violates the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate. (AP Photo/Diana Haecker, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2006, file photo, Nathan Weyiouanna's abandoned house at the west end of Shishmaref, Alaska, sits on the beach after sliding off during a fall storm in 2005. Attorneys for 12 young Alaskans who sued over state climate change policy will argue their case before Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The lawsuit says state policy that promotes fossil fuels violates the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate. (AP Photo/Diana Haecker, File)

3:30 p.m.

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Supreme Court will hear arguments in a lawsuit that claims state policy on fossil fuels is harming the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate . Sixteen Alaska youths in 2017 sued the state, claiming that human-caused greenhouse gas

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a lawsuit that claims state policy on fossil fuels is harming the Twelve Alaska youths in 2017 sued the state, claiming that human-caused greenhouse gas emission leading to climate change is creating

A lawyer representing 16 Alaska youths told the state Supreme Court his clients have a constitutional right to a healthy environment.

Attorney Andrew Welle told justices Wednesday that climate change is already damaging the lives of his clients and will have serious long-term consequences unless changes are made.

FILE - This Dec. 6, 2014, file photo shows the community of Shishmaref, Alaska, as seen from the cockpit of an approaching C130 military transport plane. Attorneys for 12 young Alaskans who sued over state climate change policy will argue their case before Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The lawsuit says state policy that promotes fossil fuels violates the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - This Dec. 6, 2014, file photo shows the community of Shishmaref, Alaska, as seen from the cockpit of an approaching C130 military transport plane. Attorneys for 12 young Alaskans who sued over state climate change policy will argue their case before Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The lawsuit says state policy that promotes fossil fuels violates the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

He asked justices to render invalid a state law that says fossil fuel development is an official state policy.

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The Alaska Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a lawsuit that claims state policy on fossil fuels is harming the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate . Sixteen Alaska youths in 2017 sued the state

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Alaska Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a lawsuit that claims state policy on fossil fuels is harming the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate . Twelve Alaska youths in 2017 sued the state, claiming that human-caused greenhouse

Assistant Attorney General Anna Jay told justices that the courtroom is not the place to decide state policy on greenhouse gas emissions.

She asked justices to affirm rulings in previous cases concluding that courts don't have tools such as public hearings to formulate a policy.

Justices Daniel Winfree did not specify when the court will issue a written opinion.

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12:01 a.m.

Attorneys for 16 young Alaskans who sued over state climate change policy are expected to argue their case before Alaska Supreme Court justices on Wednesday.

The lawsuit says state policy that promotes fossil fuels violates the constitutional right of young Alaskans to a safe climate.

The lawsuit says human-caused climate change will be catastrophic unless atmospheric carbon dioxide declines.

Among the damages it lists are increasing temperatures, changing rain and snow patterns, rising seas, storm-surge flooding, thawing permafrost, coast erosion and increased wildfires.

A judge ruled against the youths a year ago.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Gregory Miller cited previous cases that concluded the courts lack scientific, economic and technological resources that agencies can use to determine climate policy and it was best left in their hands.

The Latest: Authorities: 1 dead after Alaska plane crash .
Authorities say a man has died after a commuter plane went off the runway at the airport of a remote Aleutian Islands fishing community. Alaska State Troopers identified the victim as 38-year-old David Allan Oltman of Washington state.The city of Unalaska in a statement says 11 people were brought to a local clinic following the Thursday evening crash. Their injuries ranged from critical to minor.The city says the crash scene has been secured pending the arrival of investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board, which it says may be as early as Friday.

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