US: Sotomayor breaks new two-minute rule as Supreme Court hears immigration case - - PressFrom - US
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US Sotomayor breaks new two-minute rule as Supreme Court hears immigration case

10:20  18 october  2019
10:20  18 october  2019 Source:   thehill.com

Street in front of Supreme Court evacuated for suspicious package

  Street in front of Supreme Court evacuated for suspicious package The street in front of the Supreme Court building has been evacuated for a suspicious package Tuesday morning, the Capitol Park Police confirm. The following streets are closed: First St from Constitution Ave, NE to Independence Ave, SE 2nd St from Constitution Ave, NE to Independence Ave, SE East Cap St, NE from First St, NE to 3rd St NE Police were walking around asking people if the package belonged to them, but everyone responded no, so police said it was an emergency and began closing the roads. Officials have not told us where or when the package was found.One woman said she was walking around the Supreme Court for the rally being held outside of the building.

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor broke a new rule for justices Wednesday as the court heard arguments in an immigration and Jumping in to ask a question, Sotomayor broke the " two minute rule " that allows attorneys before the court to begin arguments for two minutes without

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s ban on travel from several predominantly Muslim countries, delivering to the president on Tuesday a political victory and an endorsement of his power to control immigration at a time of political upheaval about the treatment of

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor broke a new rule for justices Wednesday as the court heard arguments in an immigration and employment case.

Samuel Alito, Sonia Sotomayor posing for the camera: Sotomayor breaks new two-minute rule as Supreme Court hears immigration case© Greg Nash Sotomayor breaks new two-minute rule as Supreme Court hears immigration case

Jumping in to ask a question, Sotomayor broke the "two minute rule" that allows attorneys before the court to begin arguments for two minutes without being interrupted by a justice. The new rule was implemented as the new Supreme Court term began last week, CNN reported.

Chief Justice John Roberts stepped in and said the lawyer speaking could address Sotomayor's question later, according to CNN.

2 suspicious packages found outside Supreme Court building

  2 suspicious packages found outside Supreme Court building  The Supreme Court says police are investigating two suspicious packages that were found near the court just before the justices were to hear arguments over LGBT rights. \Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg says the packages were found Tuesday near an intersection between the court, the Capitol and the Library of Congress.

But on Tuesday, when the Supreme Court ’s conservative majority upheld President Trump’s ban on travel into the United States by citizens of several predominantly Muslim countries, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr In a dissent of the travel ban ruling , Justice Sonia Sotomayor offered tepid applause.

But the Supreme Court dismissed those appeals in October after the second ban expired. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor dissented from the December ruling . The appeals court based its ruling on immigration statutes, not the Constitution’s prohibition of religious discrimination.

The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case that would determine whether the state of Kansas infringed on federal law by prosecuting a migrant under state identity theft statute.

Kansas convicted Ramos Garcia for using someone else's Social Security number in order to get a job in a restaurant.

However, Garcia has challenged the case, his attorney arguing that he could not be convicted under state law because it is preempted by the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which establishes regulations of unauthorized employment.

Generally, federal immigration law supersedes state law to ensure consistent ruling across the country. Wednesday's arguments drew on the limitations placed on states in order to avoid getting in the way of federal law.

Colombia ex-president appears before Supreme Court in witness tampering investigation

  Colombia ex-president appears before Supreme Court in witness tampering investigation Colombia's popular and influential former president Alvaro Uribe, who is facing a judicial investigation over witness tampering, appeared Tuesday before the country's Supreme Court, which will decide whether or not it will try the former leader. © Raul ARBOLEDA Former Colombian president Alvaro Uribe (C) arrives at the Palace of Justice for a hearing before the Supreme Court in a case over witness tampering It was the first time an ex-president has appeared before Columbia's highest court. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that it would consider a legal challenge to President Obama’s overhaul of the nation’s immigration rules , agreeing to examine the reach of presidential power as it decides the fate of one of his most far-reaching executive actions.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court announced on Thursday that it had deadlocked in a case challenging President Obama’s immigration plan Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York expressed disappointment with the Supreme Court ruling blocking President Obama’s immigration plan, and

The Kansas Supreme Court ruled in Garcia's favor, stating that unauthorized employment among undocumented migrants is federal territory. Kansas argues that it was trying to apply its state identity theft law equally to everyone within its own borders, according to CNN.

The Trump administration has sided with Kansas in the case, with Solicitor General Noel Francisco arguing in court briefs that the lower court opinion "produced untenable results" by blocking a state from enforcing its own identity theft rule, CNN reported.

The Trump administration has also argued that the federal and state laws at issue in the case can coexist, maintaining that the state could have continued its prosecution without relying on information from federal forms.

Trump plans to appeal House subpoena for financial records to Supreme Court .
President Trump's attorneys told a federal appeals court Thursday that they intend to take a legal battle with the House Oversight Committee over the president's financial records to the Supreme Court.Trump's legal team asked the full D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday to review a three-judge panel's decision earlier this month upholding the Oversight Committee's demand for the president's finances. They also filed a separate motion to stay the circuit court's decision, saying that they intend to "ask the Supreme Court to review whether the Mazars subpoena exceeds the Committee's constitutional and statutory authority.

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