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US US takes step to require asylum-seekers' DNA

13:40  21 october  2019
13:40  21 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

Officials: Immigrant kills himself in ICE jail in Louisiana

  Officials: Immigrant kills himself in ICE jail in Louisiana HOUSTON (AP) — A Cuban man who legally sought asylum died by apparent suicide while being detained at an immigration jail in Louisiana, authorities said Wednesday. Roylan Hernandez Diaz, 43, was found unresponsive Tuesday afternoon inside his cell at the Richwood Correctional Center, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which said he had appeared to strangle himself. Hernandez had been in ICE detention since May, when he applied for asylum at a border bridge in El Paso, Texas. According to the agency, Hernandez was deemed "inadmissible" by border agents and placed in detention.

It's not clear yet whether asylum - seekers who come through official crossings will be exempt. Homeland Security officials gave a broad outline of the plan to DNA profile collection is allowed under a law expanded in 2009 to require that any adult arrested for a federal crime provide a DNA sample.

The bill is in response to asylum - seekers with children who do not have documentation the kids are theirs, Blackburn said. Requiring a DNA test will help weed out traffickers using This is a way for us to make certain that those children are properly taken care of and that these traffickers are prosecuted.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is planning to collect DNA samples from asylum-seekers and other migrants detained by immigration officials and will add the information to a massive FBI database used by law enforcement hunting for criminals, a Justice Department official said.

FILE - In this Thursday, April 18, 2019, file photo, a sign for the Department of Justice hangs in the press briefing room at the Justice Department, in Washington.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this Thursday, April 18, 2019, file photo, a sign for the Department of Justice hangs in the press briefing room at the Justice Department, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

The Justice Department will publish an amended regulation Monday that would mandate DNA collection for almost all migrants who cross between official entry points and are held even temporarily, according to the official. The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the regulation had not yet been published.

Identical twins. Identical asylum claims. Very different luck at the border

  Identical twins. Identical asylum claims. Very different luck at the border JUAREZ, Mexico - The 12-year-old identical twins entered Texas from Mexico days apart in the foothills of Mount Cristo Rey. One came with their father. The other arrived with their mother. It was June. The family's plan was to get caught by Border Patrol agents as quickly as possible, then claim asylum so they could stay in the U.S. legally while awaiting immigration court hearings. 

How are asylum seekers different? Two paths to asylum. How many refugees does the U . S . accept? Where are they from? Naturalized citizens are persons aged 18 and over who become citizens of the United States . Most legal permanent residents are eligible to apply for naturalization five years after

Asylum - seekers may face a variety of legal steps and different judges. The decisions made by different judges or by the same judge with regard to different people from the same countries can vary widely, according to one recent study by Temple University and Georgetown law schools, published in

The rule does not apply to legal permanent residents, or anyone entering the U.S. legally. Children under 14 are exempt. It's not clear yet whether asylum-seekers who come through official crossings will be exempt.

Homeland Security officials gave a broad outline of the plan to expand DNA collection at the border two weeks ago, but it was not clear then whether asylum-seekers would be included, or when it would begin.

The new policy would allow the government to amass a trove of biometric data on hundreds of thousands of migrants, raising major privacy concerns and questions about whether such data should be compelled even when a person is not suspected of a crime other than crossing the border illegally. Civil rights groups already have expressed concerns that data could be misused, and the new policy is likely to lead to legal action.

Trump’s Asylum Ban Could Apply Retroactively to Thousands of Migrants Even Though Officials Promised It Wouldn’t

  Trump’s Asylum Ban Could Apply Retroactively to Thousands of Migrants Even Though Officials Promised It Wouldn’t ProPublica is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up for ProPublica’s Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox as soon as they are published. Thousands of migrants who agreed to wait in Mexico for their asylum hearings in the United States are now finding out they may not be eligible for asylum at all. They’re stuck at the Kafkaesque intersection of two Trump policies designed to crack down on those seeking humanitarian protection. First, when they came to the U.S. to seek asylum earlier this year, they were given court dates but forced to wait in Mexico for their hearings.

Arguing that the DNA tests are unnecessary, the American Civil Liberties Union says the new plan represents another attempt by the administration to "intimidate and deter" asylum seekers . "Forced DNA collection is coercive and intrusive, and it raises serious privacy and civil liberties concerns

UK Borders Agency believes this test will help limit claims by people pretending to have fled war zones.

Justice officials hope to have a pilot program in place shortly after the 20-day comment period ends and expand from there, the official said. The new regulations are effective Monday, after the regulation is published.

Trump administration officials say they hope to solve more crimes committed by immigrants through the increased collection of DNA from a group that can often slip through the cracks. The Justice official also said it would be a deterrent — the latest step aimed at discouraging migrants from trying to enter the United States between official crossings by adding hurdles to the immigration process.

Currently, officials collect DNA on a much more limited basis — when a migrant is prosecuted in federal court for a criminal offense. That includes illegal crossing, a charge that has affected mostly single adults. Those accompanied by children generally aren't prosecuted because children can't be detained.

US close to implementing asylum agreement with Guatemala

  US close to implementing asylum agreement with Guatemala The Trump administration is close to implementing an asylum agreement with Guatemala that would limit who's eligible for asylum in the United States, according to sources familiar with the matter. © Jacquelyn Martin/AP President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media as he leaves the White House, Wednesday, October 23. The agreement, which President Donald Trump announced in the Oval Office in July, is part of a concerted effort by the administration to curb the flow of asylum seekers to the United States. The accord commits Guatemala to extend asylum to migrants who seek it.

The agreement between the US and Canada requires that refugees apply for asylum in the first country they come to, but the agreement does not apply if they cross The refugee system in Canada was having trouble tackling applications before the large influx of people seeking asylum in January.

Asylum seekers who are admitted to the US tend to say they’ve been waiting for about five days Tijuana is the most appealing destination for asylum seekers traveling northward to the US for two “ We certainly take very seriously any allegation” that an officer has unfairly denied someone the right

President Donald Trump and others in his administration often single out crimes committed by immigrants as a reason for stricter border control. But multiple studies have found that people here illegally are less likely to commit crime than U.S. citizens, and legal immigrants are even less likely to do so.

For example, a study last year in the journal Criminology found that from 1990 through 2014, states with bigger shares of migrants have lower crime rates.

Immigrant rights advocates were immediately critical following initial disclosure of the DNA collection plans two weeks ago.

"That could really change the purpose of DNA collection from one of criminal investigation to population surveillance," American Civil Liberties Union attorney Vera Eidleman said then.

Curbing immigration is Trump's signature issue, but his administration has struggled in dealing with the surge of people trying to enter the United States, mostly Central American families fleeing poverty and violence.

Authorities made more than 810,000 arrests at the border during the budget year that just ended in September — a high not seen for more than 10 years. Officials say numbers have since fallen following crackdowns, changes in asylum regulations and agreements with Central American countries, but they remain higher than in previous years.

U.S. using pilot program to fast-track deportations of asylum seekers

  U.S. using pilot program to fast-track deportations of asylum seekers Immigration lawyers who've found out about the secretive program say it denies migrants due process, restricts access to counsel and effectively ensures their prompt deportation .According to the attorneys, migrants subject to the pilot initiative, which they believe began this month, are not placed in the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) program, another experimental and controversial policy the administration implemented in late 2018. The program, also referred to as "Remain in Mexico," has required more than 55,000 asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for the duration of their court proceedings.

asylum seekers , warning that simply making it across the border is not a “free ticket” to Canada as the number of migrants crossing from the US “My concern is that if the government does not take steps to rectify [its] failure to manage our borders, we are going to rapidly see Canadians lose that

Women tell us that it is in part because the asylum system can feel very hostile and it is difficult for them to Asylum seekers do not come to the UK to claim benefits. Most know nothing about welfare benefits Almost all asylum seekers are not allowed to work and are forced to rely on state support

DNA profile collection is allowed under a law expanded in 2009 to require that any adult arrested for a federal crime provide a DNA sample. At least 23 states require DNA testing, but some occur after a suspect is convicted of a crime.

The FBI database, known as the Combined DNA Index System, has nearly 14 million convicted offender profiles, plus 3.6 million arrestee profiles, and 966,782 forensic profiles as of August 2019. The profiles in the database do not contain names or other personal identifiers to protect privacy; only an agency identifier, specimen identification number and DNA lab associated with the analysis. That way, when people aren't a match, their identification isn't exposed.

The only way to get a profile out of the system is to request through an attorney that it be removed.

Federal and state investigators use the system to match DNA in crimes they are trying to solve. As of August 2019, the database produced 479,847 hits, or matches with law enforcement seeking crime scene data, and assisted in more than 469,534 investigations.

Justice Department officials are striking a line in the regulation that gave the secretary of Homeland Security discretion to opt out of collecting DNA from immigrants because of resource limitations or operational hurdles.

Justice and Homeland Security officials are still working out details, but cheek swab kits would be provided by the FBI, the official said. The FBI will help train border officials on how to get a sample, which shouldn't take more than a few minutes.

Customs and Border Protection already collects fingerprints on everyone over 14 in its custody.

The new regulations will apply to adults who cross the border illegally and are briefly detained by Customs and Border Protection, or for a longer period by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Those who come to official crossings and are considered inadmissible and not further detained will be exempt. Other exceptions are being worked out, the official said.

More than 51,000 detainees are in ICE custody. Border Patrol custody fluctuates its facilities only hold migrants until they are processed and either released or sent to ICE custody. At the height, more than 19,000 people were held. Recently it was down to fewer than 4,000.

U.S. apprehensions at Mexican border up 88% this year: CBP .
U.S. apprehensions at Mexican border up 88% this year: CBPStill, those numbers have dropped recently, falling to 52,000 in September, the lowest monthly total for the year, Morgan said at a news briefing in front of the border barrier in El Paso, Texas.

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