US: Facebook Discloses New Disinformation Campaigns From Russia and Iran - - PressFrom - US
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US Facebook Discloses New Disinformation Campaigns From Russia and Iran

20:27  21 october  2019
20:27  21 october  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

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SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook on Monday said it had found and taken down four state-backed disinformation campaigns , the latest of dozens the company has identified and removed this year. Three of the campaigns originated in Iran , and one in Russia , Facebook said

Facebook takes down 652 pages after finding disinformation campaigns run from Iran and Russia . Facebook (FB) said the coordinated campaigns originating in Iran included 254 Facebook pages and 116 Instagram accounts that amassed more than 1 million followers across the two services.

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook on Monday said it had found and taken down four state-backed disinformation campaigns, the latest of dozens the company has identified and removed this year.

a traffic light sitting next to a sign: Facebook said it had found and taken down four state-backed disinformation campaigns.© Jim Wilson/The New York Times Facebook said it had found and taken down four state-backed disinformation campaigns.

Three of the campaigns originated in Iran, and one in Russia, Facebook said, with state-backed actors disguised as genuine users. Their posts targeted people in North Africa, Latin America and the United States, the company said.

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Facebook will label false posts more clearly as part of an effort to prevent 2020 election interference

  Facebook will label false posts more clearly as part of an effort to prevent 2020 election interference The company also banned new networks of fake accounts from Russia and IranThe moves come at a time when Facebook has been pilloried for a decision not to send political ads to fact-checkers. The company stood by that decision today, but acted to label non-advertising content that has been rated false more prominently.

Iran 's Disinformation Campaigns . Iran 's President Hassan Rouhani and Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Yet new reports suggest that the Kremlin may have company in its efforts to shape the U.S In the past few days, Facebook and Twitter were among several platforms that announced the

Facebook has taken down 652 pages, accounts, and groups it identified as part of coordinated disinformation campaigns that originated in Iran and targeted countries around the world. It also found a number of new pages connected to Russia .

At the same time, the social network unveiled several new initiatives to reduce the spread of false information across its services, including an effort to clearly label some inaccurate posts that appear on the site.

The moves suggest that while Facebook is amping up its protections ahead of the 2020 United States presidential election, malicious actors wanting to shape public discourse show no signs of going away.

Facebook, by far the world’s largest social network, faces a near-daily torrent of criticism from American presidential candidates, the public, the press and regulators around the world, many of whom argue that the company is unable to properly corral its outsize power.

Senator Elizabeth Warren, a front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, recently accused Facebook of being a “disinformation-for-profit machine.” The Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department are conducting investigations into Facebook’s market power and history of technology acquisitions.

Facebook discovers fake Russian and Iranian accounts designed to spread inflammatory disinformation

  Facebook discovers fake Russian and Iranian accounts designed to spread inflammatory disinformation With Facebook making more of a concerted effort to ensure that its massive platform isn't being used to spread lies and inflammatory disinformation, the social networking giant today revealed that it recently kicked off a network of fake profiles and group pages designed to just that. According to a blog post on the matter, Facebook said that the profiles in question can be traced back to groups located in both Iran and Russia. All told,All told, Facebook removed more than 100 profiles, about 23 pages, and upwards of 20 Instagram accounts for spreading a multitude of false stories across a variety of issues, including the conflict in the Middle East, U.S. relations with Iran, the Black Lives Matter movement, U.S.

SAN FRANCISCO — Last year, when Facebook disclosed a sweeping, coordinated disinformation campaign carried out by Russian agents, the company presented the first evidence of a Facebook said on Friday that it had identified and removed a new influence network that had originated in Iran .

Facebook , Google and Twitter remove hundreds of accounts from Russia and Iran that tried to influence US elections. Facebook also took down a second campaign it said was linked to Russia . The United States earlier this year indicted 13 Russians for alleged attempts to meddle in U.S

Facebook generally takes a hands-off approach toward users sharing false or inaccurate information on the site. Last week, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, delivered a robust defense of the company’s policies, including users and politicians’ ability to publish inaccurate posts. He said that Facebook had been founded to give people a voice.

The company does not want to be the arbiter of what speech will be allowed on the platform, Facebook executives have said. But the people and accounts posting to the network, they said, should be clearly identifiable.

To that end, Facebook will now apply labels to pages considered state-sponsored media — including outlets like Russia Today — to inform people whether the outlets are wholly or partially under the editorial control of their country’s government. The company will also apply the labels to the outlet’s Facebook Page, as well as make the label visible inside of the social network’s advertising library.

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LONDON — Facebook identified two disinformation campaigns originating from Russia — including one tied to an agency controlled by the Kremlin — that In August, Facebook also removed 652 fake accounts, pages and groups originating in Russia and Iran that were trying to spread misinformation.

Facebook and Twitter each said on Tuesday they had disabled a sprawling disinformation campaign that appeared to originate in Iran , including two accounts on Twitter that mimicked Republican congressional candidates and may have sought to push pro- Iranian political messages.

“We will hold these Pages to a higher standard of transparency because they combine the opinion-making influence of a media organization with the strategic backing of a state,” Facebook said in a blog post.

Last week, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, defended his company’s stance on free expression.© Justin T. Gellerson for The New York Times Last week, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, defended his company’s stance on free expression. The company said it developed its definition of state-sponsored media with input from more than 40 outside global organizations, including Reporters Without Borders, the European Journalism Center, Unesco and the Center for Media, Data and Society.

The company will also more prominently label posts on Facebook and on its Instagram app that have been deemed partly or wholly false by outside fact-checking organizations. Facebook said the change was meant to help people better determine what they should read, trust and share. The label will be displayed prominently on top of photos and videos that appear in the news feed, as well as across Instagram stories.

Follow Mike Isaac on Twitter: @MikeIsaac.

EU tells Facebook, Google and Twitter to take more action on fake news .
The EU acknowledged tech companies have taken steps to be more transparent but said "there is more work to be done."In a joint statement published Tuesday alongside progress reports from the companies, the EU said the impact of the "self-regulatory measures" remains unclear.

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