US: Previously secret documents detail alleged abuse of children in Border Patrol custody - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

US Previously secret documents detail alleged abuse of children in Border Patrol custody

05:15  24 october  2019
05:15  24 october  2019 Source:   sandiegouniontribune.com

Man in custody after stealing police cruisers, leading officers on chase, Purcell police say

  Man in custody after stealing police cruisers, leading officers on chase, Purcell police say A man was taken into custody after Purcell police said he stole multiple vehicles, including two police patrol cars and led officers on a chase early Tuesday morning. According to Purcell police, the man first stole a vehicle in Pottawatomie County and drove to Dibble, where he reportedly crashed the car into a pond. Dibble police found him and placed him in handcuffs, but the man was able to get away and take off in a Dibble police vehicle, according to police. Police said the man ditched the cruiser and stole a deputy’s personal truck. He then drove the truck to Purcell.

In complaints, children describe being deprived of edible food and potable water and held in freezing and unsanitary cells with inadequate bedding and no access to personal hygiene items. In direct violation of federal law, DHS does not appear to have reported alleged child abuse out to the FBI.

The deaths of migrant children in Border Patrol custody since December have triggered an uproar over Trump has previously blamed Democrats for the deaths. "Any deaths of children or others at the Dozens of migrant children and their parents submitted sworn declarations alleging they had

SAN DIEGO — The American Civil Liberties Union has made public 35,000 pages of previously secret reports detailing allegations of abuse of minors by Border Patrol agents.

a black and yellow shirt: Lawyers are accusing Customs and Border Protection of holding migrant children in custody longer than allowed to in San Diego.© John Gibbins/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS Lawyers are accusing Customs and Border Protection of holding migrant children in custody longer than allowed to in San Diego.

The documents describe alleged instances of minors being beaten and robbed by agents, migrants hiding under bushes being run over by agents riding ATVs, and of minors being placed in detention with adults. At least one case describes a legal U.S. resident being held in an immigration detention center because he did not have the right form of identification on him.

Border Patrol agents in Arizona find 32 migrants hiding in back of semitruck on Interstate 19

  Border Patrol agents in Arizona find 32 migrants hiding in back of semitruck on Interstate 19 A Border Patrol K-9 alerted agents to people possibly being inside the truck, officials said.A Border Patrol dog trained to detect human smuggling and drugs alerted to the truck, which was pulled over for a secondary inspection at a checkpoint on Interstate 19 between Nogales and Tucson.

Examples of the documented abuses include allegations that CBP officials: Punched a child ’s head three The report also shows evidence of CBP holding migrant children in excess of the 72-hour The documents obtained from the government show no evidence that any of the abuses detailed

Often, children noted that other agents witnessed the abuse or saw the injuries but refused them President Trump was endorsed by the Border Patrol union, which had never previously endorsed If the abuses were this bad under Obama when the Border Patrol described itself as constrained

The “significant incident” reports cover a time period between 2009 and 2014, during the Obama administration.

Also included in the collection of records are some instances alleging assaults against Border Patrol agents by migrants along the southern border, including rock throwing.

This is actually the second trove of documents the ACLU has released in as many years. In 2018, the ACLU published more than 30,000 pages of documents obtained from U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s two oversight agencies, outlining possibly hundreds of separate allegations of abuse or mistreatment of minors under 18 who either crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally or claimed asylum from 2009 to 2014.

Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology

  Border Agents Could Get Bodycams With Facial Recognition Technology Customs and Border Protection is considering outfitting Border Patrol with controversial facial recognition technology deployed through their body cameras, according to a new federal filing. The agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach. WithinThe agency has published a Request for Information from potential vendors on expanding its network of officer-worn body cameras, specifically to record interactions with the public—both U.S. and foreign citizens—in areas fixed cameras may not reach.

Migrant children kept in Customs and Border Protection custody have faced unsanitary conditions, verbal abuse and threats since arriving in the country, reports submitted to the Office of Refugee Resettlement by clinicians and case managers show.

Given the arduous journey many children take to get to the U.S. and the unsanitary conditions in Border Patrol centers, medical experts and immigrant rights “Until the government starts complying with its basic legal obligations, they are jeopardizing the health and lives of children in their custody .”

Those documents were the basis for a report called “Neglected and Abused” that the ACLU wrote with academics from the University of Chicago.

The new documents published last week by the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties include records from CBP and Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The ACLU originally asked for these documents in 2014 to scrutinize the Department of Homeland Security’s investigation of allegations made against both agencies between 2009 and 2014. It took five years of litigation for the ACLU to finally obtain the heavily redacted documents this year.

Staff attorneys with the ACLU wanted the documents to get a sense of how thoroughly DHS investigated those allegations.

But the documents are so heavily redacted that the ACLU has been unable to determine what happened to each individual claim, said ACLU staff attorney Sarah Thompson.

Proposed Trump Administration Plan Would Require DNA Samples from Detained Migrants

  Proposed Trump Administration Plan Would Require DNA Samples from Detained Migrants While the administration says the proposal will help solve crimes, the move is likely to anger rights advocates.Should the rule be implemented as written or with little change, it will allow the government to amass a cache of genetic information on hundreds of thousands of migrants each year who are not suspected of any crime other than unauthorized border crossing.

Immigrant children in the custody of U.S. border authorities allegedly suffered pervasive abuse The documents describe hundreds of cases of alleged abuse said to have occurred between 2009 and The allegations include reports of physical, verbal, sexual and psychological abuse of migrant

In other reports, Border Patrol agents reportedly used tasers to inflict pain on children in violation of policies prohibiting the use of the electric shock devices The ACLU says that it began requesting the documents after immigrant watchdogs noticed an increase in the number of stories of abuse .

“We have been unable to trace a single complaint from beginning to end,” she said.

Thompson described DHS’ method of investigating complaints as a hot-potato approach in which oversight agencies simply pass claims along to different departments. Each time an allegation is handed over to another agency it gets a different case number, which makes it difficult to track.

“These documents show a persistent pattern of serious allegations of child abuse at the hands of federal immigration officials dating back to 2009,” said Mitra Ebadolahi, senior staff attorney at the ACLU. “Additionally, they show how dysfunctional DHS oversight can be, and underscore the urgent need for meaningful accountability throughout the Department.”

When the ACLU published a report based on the 30,000 pages of documents from 2018, CBP responded with a rebuke of the report’s findings. The federal law enforcement agency said “the false accusations made by the ACLU against the previous administration are unfounded and baseless,” adding that regulators “already completed an investigation and found these claims to be unsubstantiated and did not observe misconduct or inappropriate conduct.”

Mexican immigrant in CBP custody dies at Arizona hospital

  Mexican immigrant in CBP custody dies at Arizona hospital Medical officials determined that the man had a pre-existing heart condition, according to a CBP statement"U.S. Customs and Border Protection is saddened to report a 49-year-old man from Mexico was pronounced deceased Monday morning in a Southern Arizona hospital," the agency wrote. "Our condolences are with his family.

Stories of Border Patrol mistreatment are common. But no one has alleged abuse in Caal Maquin’s case to date. The treatment of children while in CBP custody has come under especially close scrutiny; an American Civil Liberties Union report published in spring 2018 based on documents from

Members of a secret Facebook group for current and former Border Patrol agents joked about the deaths of migrants, discussed throwing burritos at Latino members of Congress visiting Agents at the compound in Clint, Texas, have been accused of holding children in neglectful, inhumane conditions.

DHS did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the more recent batch of documents.

The more than 35,000 pages of documents only contain one clear example of a federal employee being disciplined.

That instance, back in 2009, involved an ICE agent who lied in a sworn affidavit about threatening to harm children while driving them from one facility to another.

That agent initially denied yelling, “Shut the f*** up. If I hear any s*** in the van I’m going to smash your f***ing faces in.” However, several witnesses corroborated the children’s allegations.

Documents show that a supervisor chastised the agent for the behavior.

“You essentially threatened the health and well-being of the juveniles,” the supervisor wrote. “As juveniles, the detainees were particularly vulnerable to any outside threat, including you. … Of even greater concern to me is your lack of candor when questioned about your conduct.”

The agent was transferred to a non-law enforcement role within DHS.

By releasing the documents, the ACLU hopes, in part, to show that these problems began well before the Trump administration.

“For those of us who have been doing this work for a long time, it’s exciting that people are finally paying attention to this, but we’ve been screaming about it for so long,” Thompson said. “Why do people think this is only happening now?”

The Obama administration deported more migrants than any administration before, earning then-President Barack Obama the title of “Deporter in Chief” among some migrant advocates. Additionally, the Obama administration detained minors when a then-unprecedented number of unaccompanied minors arrived at the southern border.

In some ways, immigration policies that the Trump administration has been able to implement are only possible because of the system he inherited from past presidents, Thompson said.

“This administration has been taking things to their logical end but the reason they’ve been able to do this is because of policies that long predate the Trump administration.”

———

©2019 The San Diego Union-Tribune

Visit The San Diego Union-Tribune at www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

More non-Mexican migrants are being arrested at the border in San Diego than ever .
SAN DIEGO - Border Patrol agents in San Diego arrested a historic number of non-Mexican migrants crossing illegally into the U.S. during the 2019 fiscal year. “San Diego sector realized its highest number of apprehensions from countries other than Mexico in the history of tracking statistics for this population with a total of 27,255 arrests,” said Kathleen Scudder, acting deputy chief patrol agent for the San Diego sector.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!