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US As Hong Kong protests spread to United States, colleges see a growing divide

23:40  26 october  2019
23:40  26 october  2019 Source:   bostonglobe.com

HK lawmakers dragged from chamber as leader heckled for second day

  HK lawmakers dragged from chamber as leader heckled for second day Pro-democracy lawmakers were dragged out of Hong Kong's legislature by security guards on Thursday after they heckled the city's pro-Beijing leader for a second day running, the latest outburst of political rancour in the strife-torn city. Lam was unable to give a State of the Union-style policy speech on Wednesday after pro-democracy lawmakers, who form a minority on the pro-Beijing-stacked legislature, repeatedly interrupted her. Instead, she was forced to deliver the address in a pre-recorded video.

For much of the year, Frances Hui followed the Hong Kong demonstrations from her dorm room at Emerson College, feeling guilty that she was safe in Boston while clashes grew increasingly violent for her fellow Hong Kongers.

a person standing in front of a building: Emerson College student Frances Hui stood at the Chinatown Gate in Boston. When she protested on campus in support of the movement this month, she did not expect to fear for her own well-being.© Charles Krupa Emerson College student Frances Hui stood at the Chinatown Gate in Boston. When she protested on campus in support of the movement this month, she did not expect to fear for her own well-being.

But when she protested on campus in support of the movement this month, she did not expect to fear for her own well-being.

Students from mainland China, she said, confronted her with expletives and lewd gestures. Earlier, a classmate posted an op-ed she had written, titled “I Am From Hong Kong, Not China,” along with a Facebook comment: “Whomever opposes my greatest China, no matter how far they are, must be executed.”

Hong Kong's leader backs police use of force as protesters plan 'illegal' march

  Hong Kong's leader backs police use of force as protesters plan 'illegal' march Hong Kong's leader backs police use of force as protesters plan 'illegal' marchFollowing a week of relative calm, Sunday's march will test the strength of the pro-democracy movement. Campaigners vowed it would go ahead despite police ruling the rally illegal.

As the protests in Hong Kong enter their 21st week, the conflict is spilling onto campuses across the United States and highlighting rising tensions between Hong Kong-born students and their classmates from mainland China. College officials face the challenging task of supporting free expression without alienating the largest demographic of international students on US campuses.

Schools in the United States have yet to report physical attacks, like one at the University of Queensland in Australia this summer. But solidarity protests and lectures have devolved into shouting matches. Pro-Hong Kong “Lennon walls,” covered with sticky notes and artwork, have been vandalized. And private conversations on and off campus have been painful and awkward.

Hong Kong leader to visit Japan after huge rally, night of violence

  Hong Kong leader to visit Japan after huge rally, night of violence Hong Kong leader to visit Japan after huge rally, night of violenceLam is to attend Emperor Naruhito's enthronement ceremony in Tokyo's imperial palace on Tuesday and return home that evening.

At the University of California, Davis, students collecting signatures for a petition supporting a pro-Hong Kong congressional bill were confronted by classmates who grabbed their Hong Kong flag, broke the pole, and threw it into the trash. Students also asked university administrators to cancel a rally organized by the Hong Kong group.

During family weekend this month at Brown University, an alumnus and a student confronted a professor at his lecture on the protests, accusing him of bias toward the Communist Party of China and suggesting that he was bankrolled by Chinese political groups.

Students from Hong Kong said the values of the movement seem straightforward and ripe for campus support in the United States: democracy, freedom of expression, the right to protest. But given the sizable mainland Chinese populations at US universities — along with accusations that the protesters have incited violence and lawlessness — the question of how schools should address the issue has been anything but simple.

Hong Kong government to withdraw bill that sparked protests

  Hong Kong government to withdraw bill that sparked protests Hong Kong authorities are set to formally withdraw an unpopular extradition bill that sparked months of chaotic protests in the semi-autonomous Chinese city. (Pictured) Riot police use pepper spray on Oct. 13.

Of the 1.1 million international students in the United States, one-third come from China, according to the Institute of International Education. In the 2017-2018 school year, more than 360,000 were from the mainland and 7,000 from Hong Kong. International students typically pay full tuition, serving as a critical source of funds for universities: They contributed more than $30 billion to the US economy in the 2014-2015 school year.

Joy Ming King, a senior at Wesleyan University, spoke last month as part of a panel on the protests, sharing his experience marching in Hong Kong this summer. More than 100 students packed the room. Days later, he read in Wesleyan’s campus newspaper that the university was exploring the opening of a satellite campus in China, in partnership with a Chinese corporation and a theater academy. The leader of the venture would be a Chinese Communist Party secretary.

“I came back to campus and found out my university’s administration is proposing to partner with the regime that my friends and family are being terrorized by,” said King, who later organized a rally opposing the project.

Michael Roth, president of Wesleyan and author of “Safe Enough Spaces,” said that “there isn’t just one student view about events in Hong Kong” and that he had met with students in recent weeks to discuss the protests and project.

On Thursday, Roth sent an e-mail notifying students that after a visit to Beijing and Taiwan this month, he would not move forward with the project.

Hong Kong protesters gather for "emergency" call for autonomy .
Hong Kong protesters gather for "emergency" call for autonomy(Pictured) Riot police use pepper spray on Oct. 13.

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