•   
  •   
  •   

US Trump administration weighs restricting asylum seekers from working

21:35  04 november  2019
21:35  04 november  2019 Source:   nbcnews.com

U.S. using pilot program to fast-track deportations of asylum seekers

  U.S. using pilot program to fast-track deportations of asylum seekers Immigration lawyers who've found out about the secretive program say it denies migrants due process, restricts access to counsel and effectively ensures their prompt deportation .According to the attorneys, migrants subject to the pilot initiative, which they believe began this month, are not placed in the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) program, another experimental and controversial policy the administration implemented in late 2018. The program, also referred to as "Remain in Mexico," has required more than 55,000 asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for the duration of their court proceedings.

WASHINGTON — With a newly named acting secretary of Department of Homeland Security, the Trump administration is working on unveiling a set of new restrictions this week that are meant to further deter asylum seekers from entering the United States by limiting their ability to work, according to four DHS officials.

a person holding a blue umbrella: Image: A Mexican citizen fleeing violence camps in a queue with a child to try to cross into the U.S. to apply for asylum at Cordova-Americas border crossing bridge in Ciudad Juarez© Jose Luis Gonzalez Image: A Mexican citizen fleeing violence camps in a queue with a child to try to cross into the U.S. to apply for asylum at Cordova-Americas border crossing bridge in Ciudad Juarez

The new proposal, which has not yet been finalized, would keep asylum seekers from applying for work permits until they had been in the country for at least a year, the officials said.

For transgender migrants fleeing death threats, asylum in the U.S. is a crapshoot

  For transgender migrants fleeing death threats, asylum in the U.S. is a crapshoot As has happened so often in her life, Mayela Villegas once again faced the threat of violence. It was a late afternoon in September and she was alone. Hundreds of other asylum seekers camped at the foot of the U.S.-Mexico border bridge were resting before volunteers arrived with dinner. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Suddenly, a fellow Central American migrant appeared at her tent, growling threats.

Under previous guidelines, asylum seekers were able to apply for work permits 150 days after filing asylum applications, allowing them to seek employment while they await a decision on their case by an immigration judge. Due to a backlog in immigration courts, asylum cases currently take approximately two years to be adjudicated.

The policy is expected to be discussed at a meeting on Monday afternoon between Kevin McAleenan, the outgoing acting homeland security secretary, and heads of agencies for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, according to two of the officials. And it is meant to target Mexican families seeking asylum, a demographic that has recently risen while the number of Central Americans has decreased since May.

Illegal migration at southern border remains a "crisis" despite slowdown, U.S. says

  Illegal migration at southern border remains a Illegal migration at southern border remains a "crisis" despite slowdown, U.S. saysThe number of apprehensions and people turned away at the border fell to 52,546 in September, less than half the peak of 144,116 in May but up 4 percent from September 2018.

The Trump administration attributes the rise in Mexican asylum claims to the inability to enforce MPP, better known as "Remain in Mexico" against Mexican nationals. Currently, under an agreement with the Mexican government, Central American asylum seekers are sent back to Mexico to wait until their court date, sending a strong message of deterrence from the United States. But Mexicans seeking asylum are allowed into the United States.

One of the DHS officials said proponents of the policy believe prolonging the period when Mexicans are not allowed to work while they wait for their claim will deter them from coming to the United States in the first place.

In Ciudad Juarez, Mexican asylum seekers are facing long lines to enter through legal ports of entry to United States, according to a report by the Los Angeles Times, as part of a practice called "metering" where Customs and Border Protection officers only allow in a limited number of asylum seekers per day. Since 2014, the majority of asylum seekers have been Central Americans, but the increase of Mexicans indicates that trend could be changing.

Trump admin targets soon-to-be-published insider book by 'Anonymous'

  Trump admin targets soon-to-be-published insider book by 'Anonymous' 'A Warning' — expected to be highly critical of the president — is set to hit bookshelves later this month."Our author knows that the President is determined to unmask whistleblowers who may be in his midst. That's one of the reasons 'A WARNING' was written," the literary agency, Javelin, said in a statement, referring to the soon-to-be-published book. "But we support the publisher in its resolve that the administration's effort to intimidate and expose the senior official who has seen misconduct at the highest levels will not prevent this book from moving forward.

In September, the Trump administration proposed a rule that would extend the deadline for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to respond to asylum seekers applying for work permits past a 30-day window.

With varied success, DHS under the Trump administration has sought to implement a range of restrictions on asylum seekers, including making them ineligible to asylum if they pass through another country without first claiming there. That policy was recently allowed to go forward by the Supreme Court while immigration groups continue to fight it in lower courts.

On Friday, the Department announced that Chad Wolf would serve as acting DHS secretary. Wolf is seen by some in the administration as not as hardlined on immigration as others, including White House senior advisor Stephen Miller. But he was an early drafter of the policy that separated immigrant children from their parents in 2018.

From Trotsky to Morales, Mexico's asylum tradition .
From Leon Trotsky to Luis Bunuel to Salvador Allende's widow, Mexico has a long tradition of offering asylum to political exiles -- right down to newly arrived Bolivian ex-president Evo Morales. An even more famous figure arrived seven years later: Trotsky. Exiled from the Soviet Union in 1929 by Joseph Stalin, the Marxist revolutionary drifted from Turkey to Norway to France before finally landing in Mexico in 1937."It was the muralist Diego Rivera who asked President Lazaro Cardenas to grant (Trotsky) asylum. But we all know the consequences. Mexican protection failed and Ramon Mercader came along," said Gutierrez.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 0
This is interesting!