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US American families fleeing Mexico arrive in Arizona days after cartel massacre

14:10  10 november  2019
14:10  10 november  2019 Source:   foxnews.com

At least nine Americans killed in Mexican highway ambush

  At least nine Americans killed in Mexican highway ambush The dead included 8-month-old twins, said Kendra Lee Miller, who is related to many of the victims. There were at least eight survivors. Miller added that the victims lived in La Mora, which is about 75 miles south of the U.S. border.© Kendra Miller Image: Rhonita Miller and her twins Titus and Tiana Miller named the victims as Christina Marie Langford Johnson, 29, Dawna Langford, 43, and Trevor Langford, 11, and Rogan Langford, two-and-a-half. Also slain were Rhonita Miller, 30, Howard Miller, 12, Krystal Miller, 10, and eight-month-old twins, Titus and Tiana Miller.

A caravan of members of a Mormon offshoot sect crossed into Arizona on Saturday after fleeing Mexico following this week's drug cartel ambush that killed nine Americans.

a group of people posing for the camera: Relatives of the nine Americans killed by a drug cartel are escorted into Mexico by police to bury the victims; William La Jeunesse reports.© FoxNews.com Relatives of the nine Americans killed by a drug cartel are escorted into Mexico by police to bury the victims; William La Jeunesse reports.

The Arizona Daily Star reported that 18 vehicles carrying about 100 people entered the U.S. via the port of entry in Douglas, Ariz.

Bryce Langford, whose mother, Dawna Ray Langford, was one of the women killed Monday, told the Daily Star he was on his way to visit his brother at a hospital in Tucson. He said most of the families are traveling to Phoenix, and others are heading to Tucson. They are not sure where they will settle down in the long term.

13-year-old survivor in Mexico attack hid siblings in bushes

  13-year-old survivor in Mexico attack hid siblings in bushes Three American women and six children were killed after they were attacked by gunmen believed to be with one of Mexico's cartelsEight children survived, five with bullet wounds. The survivors are being treated in a Tucson hospital.

The families had lived in the hamlets of La Mora and Colonia LeBaron, two communities in northern Mexico's Sonora state that were left grieving after the massacre that left six women and three children dead. Other residents of the hamlets planned to depart in the coming days.

The Americans were riding in a convoy of SUVs when attackers opened fire on a dirt road from La Mora leading to Colonia LeBaron. Gunmen from the Juarez drug cartel had apparently set up the ambush as part of a turf war with the Sinaloa cartel, and the U.S. families drove into it.

Mexican officials said the attackers may have mistaken the group's large SUVs for those of a rival gang.

About 300 people live in the small community of La Mora, whose residents consider themselves Mormon but are not affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

Brandon Judd: Mexican ambush murders should convince Congress to secure our border NOW

  Brandon Judd: Mexican ambush murders should convince Congress to secure our border NOW Securing our border is vitally important to protect the safety of the American people, strengthen our national security, reduce drug cartel violence and illegal drug shipments, and ensure that our immigration laws work for the betterment of the American people and our country. Politicians and special interest groups who believe they can pick and choose which laws we should enforce – and ignore any laws they dislike – are making a dangerous move that can render our laws meaningless and endanger our safety.

The spread-out community in Mexico traces its origins to the end of polygamy more than a century ago by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, forcing Mormon families in the U.S. with multiple wives to establish offshoots elsewhere.

Much of the area is generally without law enforcement most of the time, and residents have taken to providing their own security since the 2009 killing of an anti-crime activist.

It took Mexican soldiers more than 8 hours to respond to Monday's attacks -- the nearest units were about 100 miles away at the time. Five surviving children hid in the mountains with bullet wounds.

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Langford, who was raised in La Mora but now lives in North Dakota, said the community has learned more about cartel hitmen in the area in recent months, and people had been considering moving. Monday's tragedy was the final straw.

"The assets that they've acquired down there are tremendous," he said. "And to have to up and leave from one day to the next and leave all that behind, there's definitely a lot of sad people here."

The victims were buried this week. Titus and Tiana Miller, 8-month-old twins, were laid to rest Friday in Colonia LeBaron with their mother, Rhonita “Nita” Miller, along with their siblings, 12-year-old Howard Jr. and 10-year-old Kristal. Langford, 43, and her two sons, 11-year-old Trevor and 2-year-old Rogan, were buried Thursday in La Mora. Christina Langford Johnson was buried Saturday morning.

Fox News' Paulina Dedaj and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

FBI investigating killing of US women and children in Mexico .
MEXICO CITY (AP) — FBI agents are in Mexico helping investigate the fatal shootings of nine American women and children in northern Mexico last week. FBI spokeswoman Lauren Hagee said Tuesday that agents are "providing assistance at the invitation of the Mexican Government." "The FBI remains committed to working alongside our international partners to help bring justice to the perpetrators of this heinous act of violence," Hagee said in aFBI spokeswoman Lauren Hagee said Tuesday that agents are "providing assistance at the invitation of the Mexican Government.

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