US: Justice Department asks Supreme Court to lift hold on federal executions - - PressFrom - US
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US Justice Department asks Supreme Court to lift hold on federal executions

21:00  03 december  2019
21:00  03 december  2019 Source:   nbcnews.com

Supreme Court blocks Justice Department from restarting federal executions next week

  Supreme Court blocks Justice Department from restarting federal executions next week A series of federal executions that were set to begin on Monday will remain on hold, the Supreme Court said on Friday. The court's order is a loss for the Trump administration, which announced last July that it would reinstate the federal death penalty after a nearly two-decade lapse. The Supreme Court denied the government's request to wipe away a lower court opinion holding that inmates were likely to succeed in their argument that the new protocol conflicted with federal law.

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to let the government carry out the first federal execution in nearly 17 years.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) logo is pictured on a wall after a news conference to discuss alleged fraud by Russian Diplomats in New York December 5, 2013. Carlo Allegri/Reuters© Carlo Allegri/Reuters The Department of Justice (DOJ) logo is pictured on a wall after a news conference to discuss alleged fraud by Russian Diplomats in New York December 5, 2013. Carlo Allegri/Reuters

A federal judge in Washington put a hold late last month on plans for a resumption of the death penalty, which was to begin next week. Late Monday, after a federal appeals court refused to lift the hold, Solicitor General Noel Francisco urged the Supreme Court to either stay the judge's ruling or toss it out entirely.

14 states ask Supreme Court to let Trump resume federal executions

  14 states ask Supreme Court to let Trump resume federal executions More than a dozen states on Wednesday filed a brief to the Supreme Court expressing support for the Trump administration’s push to resume federal executions. © Greg Nash 14 states ask Supreme Court to let Trump resume federal executions The filing by 14 states, which each permit capital punishment, came a day after the Trump administration asked the justices to authorize the U.S. government to carry out four death sentences. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Attorney General William Barr ordered the Bureau of Prisons in July to adopt a change to the lethal injection rules for federal executions, switching from the combination of three drugs that has led to botched state executions in the past, to a single drug — pentobarbital, a barbiturate or sedative.

Prison officials scheduled a December 9 execution for Daniel Lewis Lee, a white supremacist who murdered a family of three, including an eight-year-old girl, by tying rocks to them and throwing them into the Illinois Bayou.

But Federal District Court Judge Tanya S. Chutkan put a hold on those plans, ruling that they violated the Federal Death Penalty Act of 1994, which directs that federal executions must be carried out "in the manner prescribed by the law of the state" in which the death penalty was imposed. Because the revised federal protocol would be different, she said, it violated that provision.

Judge puts temporary hold on McGahn subpoena ruling

  Judge puts temporary hold on McGahn subpoena ruling The federal judge who ordered former White House counsel Donald McGahn to appear before Congress is temporarily delaying the effect of her ruling. © Provided by Associated Press In this Sept. 27, 2018, file photo, then-White House counsel Donald McGahn listens as Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill. U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson says in a brief order Wednesday that she needs time to consider the legal issues raised by the Justice Department in seeking a longer halt.

In urging the Supreme Court to block that order, Francisco said the judge misunderstood the law. It simply refers to the type of execution, such as lethal injection or something else, and not to the details of how it's carried out. If the judge's interpretation was right, he said, a state could prevent a federal execution by refusing to reveal all the nuances of its procedures.

In seeking to resume executions of federal death row inmates, Francisco said the Justice Department was "acting on behalf of the public and the victims" to enforce death sentences handed down by juries.

Barr's move runs counter to changing public attitudes toward the death penalty. Gallup reported in late November that a majority of Americans now say life in prison is a better approach for punishing the crime of murder. Its survey showed 60 percent say life without parole "is the better penalty," while 36 percent favored the death penalty.

Gallup said it was the first time that a majority supported life over the death penalty since it began asking the question in 1985.

Blind Tennessee inmate who set woman on fire executed by electric chair .
Lee Hall's execution on Thursday is only the second of a blind prisoner in the U.S. since the reinstatement of the death penalty in 1976.Lee Hall, 53, was pronounced dead at 7:26 p.m. at a Nashville maximum-security prison, prison officials said. He chose the electric chair over Tennessee’s preferred execution method of lethal injection — an option allowed inmates in the state who were convicted of crimes before January 1999. He also became the first blind inmate in U.S. modern history to die by electrocution.

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