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US NAS Pensacola shooting leads Navy instructor pilots to tell top brass: 'Arm us'

02:45  11 december  2019
02:45  11 december  2019 Source:   foxnews.com

Shooter at U.S. Navy base in Pensacola, Florida, is 'confirmed dead'

  Shooter at U.S. Navy base in Pensacola, Florida, is 'confirmed dead' Authorities said there had been an "active shooter" on Friday at Naval Air Station Pensacola, a U.S. Navy base in Florida, before saying the shooter was dead a few minutes later, according to the Escambia County Sheriff's.This is a breaking news story.

EXCLUSIVE: A group of U . S . Navy instructor pilots asked top military brass for permission to arm Two pilots said the Saudi shooter had 10 minutes to carry out his deadly assault on defenseless Navy sailors at the One pilot called base security at NAS Pensacola and other Navy bases “mall cops

A Saudi national at Naval Air Station Pensacola fatally shot three people before he was killed on It was the second shooting this week at a Navy base. “Walking through the crime scene was like The Saudis who filmed the shooting told investigators that they just happened to be there at that time

A group of U.S. Navy instructor pilots asked top military brass for permission to arm themselves in the wake of the shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., where a Saudi military pilot gunned down three American sailors and wounded eight others.

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One of the shooting victims was the captain of the U.S. Naval Academy rifle team, an “excellent marksman,” according to his brother.

“It’s so stupid that on a military base, the shooter was allowed to roam free for so long,” according to one instructor pilot. “In a gun fight, that’s an eternity.” The pilot, like others interviewed by Fox News, did not want his name used because he was not authorized to speak with the media.

NAS Pensacola shooting: Why the Naval air base has international flight students

  NAS Pensacola shooting: Why the Naval air base has international flight students Training international students at the Naval Air Station Pensacola is a core part of the base's mission.The base employs 16,000 military and 7,400 civilian personnel. This includes major tenant commands: Naval Aviation Schools Command, Naval Air Technical Training Center, Marine Aviation Training Support Group 21 and 23, the Blue Angels and the headquarters for Naval Education Training Command, a command which combines direction and control of all Navy education and training.

The Saudi officer is one of many of international aviators currently training at NAS Pensacola , officials told reporters. The Royal Saudi Air Force uses US -made aircraft and trains many of its pilots – including members of the royal family – at US facilities.

"The sorrow from the tragic event on NAS Pensacola will have a lasting impact on our installation and community," Capt. Tim Kinsella, the base's commanding officer Among the wounded was Charles Hogue, a base police officer who was shot in the thigh while responding to the shooting , a family

a group of people walking down a street: The FBI says the Pensacola shooter used a hunting loophole to purchase his gun legally; Jacqui Heinrich reports.© FoxNews.com The FBI says the Pensacola shooter used a hunting loophole to purchase his gun legally; Jacqui Heinrich reports.

One of the pilots said Navy brass denied their request to arm themselves on base.

Two pilots said the Saudi shooter had 10 minutes to carry out his deadly assault on defenseless Navy sailors at the “API” -- aviation pre-flight indoctrination -- building. The Naval Aviation Safety school is also located in the building.

The instructor pilots said the incentive to arm was obvious. “We need to protect not just the pilots, but our aircraft that are worth millions.”

One pilot called base security at NAS Pensacola and other Navy bases “mall cops,” because protection on the base has been outsourced to private security and many were “fat and out of shape.”

'He just shot through the door': Injured airman describes Pensacola Navy base shooting

  'He just shot through the door': Injured airman describes Pensacola Navy base shooting Ryan Blackwell and two colleagues took cover when they heard gunshots at the Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday. He was shot multiple times.Hearing gunshots down the hall, Ryan Blackwell and two of his colleagues took cover in their office.

Earlier Friday, two US officials identified the student as a second lieutenant in the Saudi air force, and said authorities were investigating whether the attack was terrorism-related. Alex McGinley, a tattoo artist who works near the Pensacola base, said he was alerted to the shooting by one of his clients

One of the officers was shot in arm and treated at a local hospital. The other was shot in the knee and was undergoing surgery. The FBI has taken the lead in the investigation, though there has The Pensacola base is also home of the Blue Angels, the Navy 's Flight Demonstration Squadron, and the

“I have zero confidence the guy I show my ID card to at the gate could save me,” one pilot added. Fox News spoke to three Navy instructor pilots Tuesday.

It’s an opinion shared by many across the military, including the U.S. Army; more than a dozen soldiers and an unborn child were gunned down at Fort Hood in 2009.

“We trust 18-year-old privates in combat with grenades, anti-tank missiles, rifles and machine guns, but we let service members get slaughtered because we don’t trust anyone to be armed back here in the United States,” a senior U.S. Army officer told Fox News.

“Why are we cowering in our offices, it’s insane,” the officer added.

The first responders to the shooting at the military base were cops off base, not members of the military, which the instructor pilots found insulting.

The gunman, Saudi Arabian Air Force 2nd Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani, was shot and killed by a deputy from the Escambia County Sheriff's Office.

Saudi shooter believed to have acted alone in U.S. Navy base rampage: FBI

  Saudi shooter believed to have acted alone in U.S. Navy base rampage: FBI Saudi shooter believed to have acted alone in U.S. Navy base rampage: FBIRachel Rojas, special agent in charge of the FBI's Jacksonville office, said the shooter used a Glock model 45 9mm handgun that he had purchased legally in Florida.

A Wisconsin state trooper used a drone to find a dog and reunite it with its injured owner following a vehicle crash last week, officials said. Trending in US . NAS Pensacola shooting leads Navy instructor pilots to tell top brass : ' Arm us '.

Residents around NAS Pensacola are accustomed to hearing the national anthem on the base PA system at 8 a.m. every day. ‘It hits so hard’: Navy base community shaken, stunned over Pensacola shooting .

The U.S. Marine Corps for years has provided armed Marines known as “Guardian Angels” to watch over training at The Basic School for newly minted Marine officers in Quantico, Va., outside the nation’s capital. The Guardian Angels have watched over the young officers during live-fire training and were ready to respond. Some service members asked for a similar program for the Navy, even for flight school.

“Our message is simple: arm us,” one pilot said. “We don’t want to count on cops or gate guards to save us in a crisis.”

The Saudi pilot was training to be a naval flight officer, a “backseater” in military jargon, not a pilot, one of the instructor pilots told Fox News.

The family of one of the three victims, Ensign Joshua Kaleb Watson, 23, who had graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy this past May, urged lawmakers and military officers to allow service members to protect themselves on base during an appearance Tuesday morning on “Fox and Friends.”

Watson captained the 2018-2019 U.S. Naval Academy rifle team, according to the Naval Academy Athletic Department.

Navy grounds Saudi pilot trainees after deadly shooting at Pensacola Naval Air Station

  Navy grounds Saudi pilot trainees after deadly shooting at Pensacola Naval Air Station The Navy has grounded more than 300 Saudi nationals training to be pilots after the shooting last week at Pensacola Naval Air Station.Training for all personnel at the Florida base was suspended over the weekend, said Navy Cdr. Clay Doss, a spokesman. Limited training resumed Monday, including for some international students. However, the Saudi students remain grounded, Doss said. Some classroom training for them is expected to resume this week.

Pensacola shooting :FBI investigating tweets purportedly from suspect. Simmons said he spoke Friday at the hospital with He said one deputy was treated for an arm injury and released from the hospital Friday. Simmons said he also spoke with a Navy police officer who was injured in the shooting .

The 2 US Navy sailors being hailed as heroes in the Pensacola shooting were fresh out of military training. Two slain US service members who have been hailed for their perseverance during the deadly shooting Watson, an aspiring naval pilot , recently graduated from the US Naval Academy.

He was well qualified to have a firearm and defend himself. If we are going to ask these young men and women to stand watch for our country, they need the opportunity to defend themselves. This isn’t the first time this happened and if we don’t change something, then it won’t be the last,” said Adam Watson, Joshua’s brother. “My brother was an excellent marksman. If my brother had not had that right stripped from him, this would be a different conversation.”

Joshua’s mother, Sheila, agreed.

“He was my baby. It hurts me. It doesn’t really anger me as much as it hurts me. My baby was standing watch and he lost his life because he wasn’t armed,” she said.

Joshua’s father, Banjamin, described his son’s heroism.

We know that he was shot at least five times and then somehow found the strength, bleeding profusely to make it out the door to tell first responders. They came up to him and with basically his last breath, summoned his courage to give an accurate description of the shooter and his location so they could do their duty.”

Another brother, Zach, added, Ever since he was five years old he wanted to be in the military.”

Flags lowered in Georgia for funeral of Navy shooting victim .
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Flags were lowered across Georgia on Monday to coincide with the funeral of one of three Navy sailors slain by a gunman at a base in Florida. The funeral service for Airman Apprentice Cameron Scott Walters, 21, of Richmond Hill was scheduled for Monday afternoon at a church in neighboring Savannah. Walters and two fellow sailors were killed Dec. 6 at Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida when a gunman opened fire at a classroom building.Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp ordered flags to be flown at half-staff Monday outside state buildings in honor of Walters.

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