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US US says no new foreign military students until better checks

23:05  12 december  2019
23:05  12 december  2019 Source:   msn.com

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He said he thought that military trainers should adopt the baseline concept of modern medicine Tuesday’s suspension of all operational training for Saudi military students in the United States “ We ’re going to look for all foreign nationals coming into the United States to make sure we have the

WASHINGTON (AP) — No new international military students will come to the United States for training until new screening procedures are in place, the Pentagon said Thursday in the wake of the deadly shooting last week by a Saudi Arabian aviation trainee at a Florida Navy base.

In this Dec. 9, 2019 photo made available by the FBI, Saudi Arabia Defense Attaché Major General Fawaz Al Fawaz (second from right) meets with Saudi students at the NAS Pensacola base in Pensacola, Fla. The Navy announced on Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019, that flight training has been suspended for about 175 Saudi Arabian students in the wake of a shooting at the base on Friday that killed three sailors and injured eight others. (FBI via AP)© Provided by Associated Press In this Dec. 9, 2019 photo made available by the FBI, Saudi Arabia Defense Attaché Major General Fawaz Al Fawaz (second from right) meets with Saudi students at the NAS Pensacola base in Pensacola, Fla. The Navy announced on Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019, that flight training has been suspended for about 175 Saudi Arabian students in the wake of a shooting at the base on Friday that killed three sailors and injured eight others. (FBI via AP)

The Defense Department's chief spokesman said there is no explicit ban on new students, but none will enter the country the department expands its role in the screening process and begins the additional reviews. Currently the bulk of the screening is done by the departments of State and Homeland Security, as well as the host nation.

6 Saudi nationals detained for questioning after NAS Pensacola shooting: Official

  6 Saudi nationals detained for questioning after NAS Pensacola shooting: Official Six Saudi nationals were detained for questioning Friday near a naval air station in Pensacola, Fla., after a Saudi gunman opened fire there, killing three people before being shot dead by officers, a senior U.S. official told Fox News. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

A US official told the AP investigators believe Alshamrani visited New York City, including The official said one of the three students who attended the party then recorded video outside the classroom More than 850 Saudis are in the US for training activities, among more than 5,000 foreign students

But what I learned from those students about Iran – its imperial dreams, its sense of historical The President should take a more measured approach in assessing the incident until FBI and other Will things always go smoothly with foreign military students ? Of course not and Pensacola is only one

Jonathan Hoffman told reporters that new screening guidelines should be in place in the coming days. The deputy defense secretary ordered a 10-day review of the vetting process earlier this week.

Federal authorities say Saudi Air Force 2nd Lt. Mohammed Alshamrani, 21, killed three U.S. sailors and injured eight other people at the Pensacola Naval Air Station last Friday. Investigators are digging into whether he acted alone, amid reports he hosted a party earlier last week where he and others watched videos of mass shootings.

This undated photo provided by the FBI shows Mohammed Alshamrani. The Saudi student opened fire inside a classroom at Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday before one of the deputies killed him. (FBI via AP)© Provided by Associated Press This undated photo provided by the FBI shows Mohammed Alshamrani. The Saudi student opened fire inside a classroom at Naval Air Station Pensacola on Friday before one of the deputies killed him. (FBI via AP)

About a dozen Saudi students who were acquaintances of the shooter are currently confined to the base. The Pentagon has suspended flight and other operational training for all Saudi Arabian students in U.S. military programs.

Asked why the safety restriction was applied to all Saudis and whether there are concerns that there is a broader threat from students from the country, Hoffman said the decision “seemed prudent.”

“If something else were to happen and we had not taken steps to address and enhance our vetting and screening, that would be unacceptable to the American people and we should be held to account for that,” Hoffman said.

He said the enhanced screening, when completed, will affect all international students.

Pentagon finds Saudi students not 'immediate threat' after Pensacola shooting .
A Pentagon screening of Saudi military students training at U.S. bases found "no information indicating an immediate threat" in the wake of the Pensacola shooting.However, a senior defense official, who requested anonymity given the sensitivity of the ongoing Pensacola investigation, cautioned that this was a Pentagon screening tool not an investigative tool, and so it's not possible to draw wider conclusions about what Saudi students may have known about the Dec. 6 attack. The FBI's Jacksonville office declined to comment on what their investigation has learned about the suspected shooter's Saudi classmates but said the review is ongoing.

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