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US At UNC-Chapel Hill, a Silent Sam protest and more questions about the $2.5 million deal

03:40  14 december  2019
03:40  14 december  2019 Source:   newsobserver.com

University of North Carolina Gives Confederate Group $2.5 Million in Lawsuit Settlement

  University of North Carolina Gives Confederate Group $2.5 Million in Lawsuit Settlement The University of North Carolina has agreed to pay a group linked with the promotion of racist ideas $2.5 million in a settlement for a lawsuit that is drawing scrutiny from lawyers. © Sara D. Davis / Getty Images A police officer guarding the Silent Sam statue at UNC Raleigh in 2017 The case stems from the provenance of the Confederate monument known as "Silent Sam," which was erected on the UNC Chapel Hill campus in 1913 and torn down by protesters in 2018.A group called the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) filed a suit against the college to gain possession of the statue, despite them having no legal claim to Silent Sam.

The Confederate Monument, University of North Carolina , commonly known as Silent Sam , is a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier by Canadian sculptor John A. Wilson

UNC - Chapel Hill interim Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz sent a letter to UNC System leaders asking them to help address concerns about the Silent Sam settlement that gave $ 2 . 5 million to Confederate group. Under fire on his campus, UNC leader asks for more clarity about Silent Sam settlement.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — As about 80 protesters came to Chapel Hill on Friday to protest the University of North Carolina System’s $2.5 million Silent Sam settlement with the North Carolina Sons of Confederate Veterans, the system’s Board of Governors — meeting over the phone — also sought more clarity about the deal.

Kevin Guskiewicz wearing a suit and tie: UNC System Interim President Bill Roper, right, shakes hands with Kevin Guskiewicz after a ceremony in Chapel Hill, N.C. celebrating Guskiewicz being named chancellor of UNC-Chapel Hill Friday, Dec. 13, 2019. Ashton Martin, UNC student body president is at left.© Ethan Hyman/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS UNC System Interim President Bill Roper, right, shakes hands with Kevin Guskiewicz after a ceremony in Chapel Hill, N.C. celebrating Guskiewicz being named chancellor of UNC-Chapel Hill Friday, Dec. 13, 2019. Ashton Martin, UNC student body president is at left.

Protesters gathered outside early in a cold rain, chanting “No payout! No BOG! No racist UNC!” and “Nat Turner! John Brown! Anti-racists run this town!”

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UNC - Chapel Hill interim Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz has listened to their concerns and relayed the campus climate to UNC System leaders in a letter this Still, UNC activist groups plan to protest at the meeting Friday to confront board members about the “$ 2 . 5 million payout to white supremacy.”

Faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill voted to condemn a settlement that would keep a Confederate monument off campus forever — but would turn it over to a Confederate heritage group and pay the group $ 2 . 5 million . In a wrenching and emotional meeting Friday, interrupted by

Some UNC-Chapel Hill students, faculty and community activists spoke out about what they called the “$2.5 million payout to white supremacy.” They were not dissuaded by the fact that board members were not in Chapel Hill in person. The board opted to hold its regular monthly meeting remotely.

“We’re here to say we won’t let them hide their actions,” said Lindsay Ayling, a UNC graduate student.

Inside the meeting room, no board members were present — only UNC System interim President Bill Roper and UNC System General Counsel Tom Shanahan.

But the topic of the Silent Sam settlement was addressed.

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State attorney general Josh Stein said $ 2 . 5 million designated for upkeep of the memorial should be used to strengthen the university and support Police stand guard after the Confederate statue known as Silent Sam was toppled by protesters at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

UNC students protest Silent Sam deal outside meeting where board members are dialing in. During the report of the Committee on University Governance, board member Marty Kotis asked about the concerns raised in the letter the board received earlier this week from Kevin Guskiewicz, the interim

Board member Marty Kotis asked about the concerns raised in a letter the board received earlier this week from Kevin Guskiewicz, the interim chancellor at UNC-Chapel Hill. In the letter, Guskiewicz said his campus is struggling with the Silent Sam decision and that he’s concerned about how the money might be used by the Confederate group.

After the settlement was announced late last month, the leader of the Confederate group had talked in a letter to his members about plans to build a division headquarters and to promote what Guskiewicz called “an unsupportable understanding of history that is at-odds with well-sourced, factual, and accurate accounts of responsible scholars.”

Kotis said he didn’t want to “armchair quarterback the settlement or the resolution” that board members agreed upon, but he asked for clarity on how the SCV could use the $2.5 million.

Shanahan replied, “It’s likely something we should address in closed session.”

Outraged UNC students and faculty slam Silent Sam decision and fear for campus safety

  Outraged UNC students and faculty slam Silent Sam decision and fear for campus safety  The UNC-Chapel Hill students, faculty and community members tasked with addressing campus safety say they are outraged by the process used to resolve the Silent Sam Confederate monument controversy last week. While they’re pleased the statue isn’t returning to campus, they say the university’s $2.5 million payment to the North Carolina chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans poses a threat to campus safety. Some also argue that it shows that UNC sympathizes with white supremacists.

With a Silent Sam protest planned, UNC board will hold its meeting over the phone. By Kate Murphy. UNC -CH students, faculty and community activist groups planned a protest at the meeting Friday to confront board members about the “$ 2 . 5 million payout to white supremacy.”

CHAPEL HILL , N.C. (WITN) - Controversy continues surrounding the " Silent Sam " statue that once stood at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . Protesters gathered on campus on Sunday both in support and opposition of the monument.

That prompted an immediate response from the protesters, about half of whom had been allowed in the meeting room. They called Shanahan a coward.

Shanahan said a consent order entered by the judge outlines a set of limitations and restrictions that a trustee has to apply when approving the use of funds by the SCV.

“Nothing in that consent order says those funds can be used for some of the things addressed in that letter,” Shanahan said.

Board member James Holmes said a document will be released that outlines the terms of the trust and specifies how the funds can be used.

“There are limited uses for these funds, and they will be defined in the agreement,” Holmes said. “Period.”

Board member Tom Goolsby then jumped into the conversation, saying he has similar concerns as Kotis.

Goolsby said there will be a “document dump of a lot of information” about this deal. He asked the Board of Governors and the legal team to make themselves available to answer all the questions that are being raised across the state on this issue.

“It appears to not be dying down, but revving up, and it very much concerns me as to what’s been done here,” Goolsby said. “I look forward to all the truth coming out in this and there being open discussion between the board and the press and the people of North Carolina as to what’s happened and what’s actually going on.”

UNC faculty demand that campus leaders speak out about $2.5 million Silent Sam deal

  UNC faculty demand that campus leaders speak out about $2.5 million Silent Sam deal Faculty members at UNC-Chapel Hill are demanding a stronger response from their leaders about the decision for the university to pay $2.5 million to a group they say contains white supremacists. They’ve called on interim Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz and provost Bob Blouin to say they oppose the payment and to get answers from the UNC System Board of Governors about how and why the decision was made.

CHAPEL HILL , N.C. — Faculty members at UNC - Chapel Hill are demanding a stronger response from their leaders about the decision for the university to pay $ 2 . 5 million to a group they say contains white supremacists. © Julia Wall/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS Demonstrators and spectators gather

The Silent Sam statue, in honor of North Carolina 's Confederate dead, stood on the campus from Speakers included Maya Little, a graduate student at UNC - Chapel Hill , who smeared blood and Folt said the new building at Odum Village would allow for a fuller, more honest history of the university .

Randy Ramsey, the board chairman, then directed the conversation back to the board’s agenda for a report from the presidential search committee. The board quickly went into closed session.

At that point, protesters left the meeting, again chanting “No payout! No BOG! No racist UNC!”

Altha Cravey, associate professor of geology at UNC, said she came out to support the student-run protest, as she has at other rallies surrounding Silent Sam.

“There are a lot of faculty that are extremely pissed off and support the students,” she said.

A group of first-year medical students at UNC also attended the protest to reject the $2.5 million deal.

“I think we all share the same sentiment,” Karoly Majtenyi said. “We are privileged members of society, and we want to speak up about this act.”

When the meeting returned to open session, without the protesters, Roper nominated Guskiewicz for the chancellor job permanently.

The board unanimously voted to approve Guskiewicz over the phone. He then called into the meeting and said he was looking forward to working alongside this “amazing leadership team.”

“I appreciate your confidence in me,” Guskiewicz said.

The meeting ended quickly after that announcement, and Roper refused to answer questions from reporters.

In the two weeks since the settlement was reached, students, faculty and alumni have marched through campus condemning it, discussed the safety threat it poses, questioned its legality and held a meeting to express their outrage over the secrecy of the settlement and their disappointment with Guskiewicz for not speaking out against it.

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  Wofford shocks depleted No. 17 North Carolina, 68-64 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — Wofford traveled to Chapel Hill and shocked a ranked North Carolina team again, getting 19 points from Trevor Stumpe and riding a 16-0 run in the second half to a 68-64 win over the 17th-ranked Tar Heels on Sunday. Storm Murphy added 15 points and Messiah Jones had 13 points for the Terriers (7-4), who went on the road to beat North Carolina for the second time in three years. Wofford, a 12-point underdog, made four 3-pointers during its decisive spurt, a 6-minute stretch in which the Tar Heels missed 10 consecutive shots.BOX SCORE: WOFFORD 68, NO.

30 Silent Sam protest at UNC . That unit, specially trained to handle civil uprisings, was blasted for aggressively using bikes to move protesters and for But the problem of more campus protests and violence is not limited to UNC , the panel said. Very few campus police departments are equipped to

BREAKING NEWS: Silent Sam is down! Protesters have toppled the controversial statue on the campus Patty Matos, a senior at UNC - Chapel Hill , said she left the protest less than an hour before the Matos said she participated in a similar protest last year, but that this one was more organized.

While many are pleased the statue will not return to UNC-Chapel Hill’s campus, they say they will not let this issue go.

And now, a national civil rights group is joining the fight on their behalf. The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law is planning to file a motion to intervene in the lawsuit, reopen the case and recover the $2.5 million.

Despite all the noise, the UNC System had remained silent until Friday.

UNC System leaders and board members involved in negotiating and approving the settlement have not responded to requests for comment or provided answers to lingering questions.

Details of the Silent Sam deal were not publicly discussed at any of the Board of Governors committee meetings Thursday.

And the brief discussion in open session of Friday’s meeting offered more questions than answers.

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Judge blocks student effort to intervene in Confederate deal .
A judge won't let students intervene in a settlement that gave a Confederate heritage group money to preserve a monument that protesters tore down at North Carolina's flagship public university.Judge Allen Baddour in Orange County ruled that the University of North Carolina students represented by the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law lacked standing to force their way into the legal case, according to WRAL-TV. The students had sought to join the case and then convince the judge to reject the legal agreement that granted possession of the “Silent Sam” statue to the Sons of Confederate Veterans, along with $2.5 million in university money for its upkeep.

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