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US A Border Patrol agent who separated migrant families says it was 'the most horrible thing I've ever done'

18:20  08 january  2020
18:20  08 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

CBP says U.S.-Mexico border apprehensions continue to decline

  CBP says U.S.-Mexico border apprehensions continue to decline Customs and Border Protection said Thursday that border apprehensions dropped in December for the seventh month in a row. © John Moore Image: US Border Agents Patrol Rio Grande Valley As Migrant Crossings Drop U.S. Border Patrol apprehended 32,858 individuals crossing at the Southwest Border between ports of entry during the month of December, CBP said in a statement released Thursday morning. That number is down from 33,511 in November and 35,405 in October.Meanwhile, CBP determined that 7,762 individuals were deemed inadmissible after presenting themselves at legal ports of entry along the southern in December.

Wesley Farris, a high-ranking officer with El Paso’s Border Patrol Union, describes what it was like to separate migrant children from their parents in a new FRONTLINE documentary -- offering a rare public criticism of family “That was the most horrible thing I ' ve ever done ,” he tells FRONTLINE.

Border Patrol agent Wesley Farris told "Frontline" that separating families at the southern U.S Agents were instructed to separate families as the administration tested the theory that doing so would "That was the most horrible thing I ' ve ever done ," Farris tells Smith in an excerpt released

a man looking at the camera© YouTube/Frontline PBS | Official
  • A Border Patrol agent says separating migrant families in the spring of 2018 was "the most horrible thing I've ever done."
  • The officer, Wesley Farris, told PBS's "Frontline" that he had to separate a devastated two-year-old boy from his family, and that he refused to do it again afterwards.
  • "The world was upside down to that kid," Farris said. "I said at that one, 'I'm not doing this anymore.'"
  • Thousands of families were separated under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy criminally punishing migrants for crossing the US-Mexico border illegally.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

A Border Patrol agent says he regrets his work separating migrant families, telling PBS's "Frontline" it was "the most horrible thing I've ever done."

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The Border Patrol agent , a veteran with 13 years on the job, had been assigned to the agency ’s It was his first time on the border since he was a rookie. He’d spent most of his career posted in the The agent , she said , blurted out that he knew of another woman who was separated from her family

Separated migrant families held in cages at Texas border – video. Congress has not given Trump From October 2016 to September 2017, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice) said , it had Central American asylum seekers wait as US Border Patrol agents take them into custody this

The Trump administration's family separations occurred mainly in the spring of 2018 under its "zero tolerance" policy to prosecute migrants who illegally crossed the US-Mexico border. Ultimately, thousands of families were separated under the policy, and children were taken to shelters across the country while their parents were detained or deported without them.

Though many of the families were eventually reunited weeks or months later, it's unclear exactly how many children were stripped from their parents, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

a little girl brushing her hair© Associated Press/Eric Gay

Wesley Farris, identified by "Frontline" as a high-ranking officer with El Paso's Border Patrol union, said his fellow agents similarly disliked the orders to separate the families. He said he didn't raise his concerns with the policy up the chain of command, but that he wanted to.

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Separated migrant families held in cages at Texas border – video. In one case, attorneys in Texas said they had been given a phone number to help parents locate their children, but it was actually Advocates for children have said they do not know how to find parents, who are more likely to have

Image caption US Border Patrol agents arrive to detain a group of Central American migrants near the US-Mexico border in June 2018. A court order then ended separations and required families to be reunited. Hundreds of children however remained in government shelters, and the New York Times

"I had to separate children from their parents … You can't help but see your own kids," he said. "None of us were happy about it. But everyone around me was just doing exactly what we all were told to do this."

Farris said the breaking point for him came when he separated a two-year-old boy from his family. He said he refused to do it again after seeing the child's devastation.

"The world was upside down to that kid. So when the contractor tried to take him away, he reached for me. He climbed up on me again and he was holding onto me. So that one got me a little bit. That was tough," Farris said.

He continued: "I said at that one, 'I'm not doing this anymore. I won't do it.' I went back to my supervisor and I told him, 'Don't assign me to do that anymore.'"

The clip of Farris' comments was published Tuesday as part of the documentary "Targeting El Paso."

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Three agents who work at Clint said they had seen unaccompanied children as young as 3 enter the facility, and lawyers who Before the influx of migrants began to wane in recent weeks, the agents said they had kept the families in a warehouse normally used to house A.T.V.s. It was converted into

The Border Patrol agent , a veteran with 13 years on the job, had been assigned to the agency ’s That was his mindset, he said , when he landed in McAllen. It was his first time on the border since “ The most I felt I could do was make sure toilet paper was stocked. Or if someone wanted an extra

The Customs and Border Protection agency did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

Watch his full interview with "Frontline" below:

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