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US Trump asks Supreme Court to let immigrant 'public charge' rule take effect

11:42  14 january  2020
11:42  14 january  2020 Source:   thehill.com

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The Trump administration on Monday asked the Supreme Court to allow it to move forward with a rule aimed at cutting back benefits for immigrants Under the Trump policy, an immigrant would be considered a public charge , or dependent, for receiving at least one public benefit such as Medicaid

Immigration experts said the rules would disproportionately affect applicants from Africa and Latin America. The other injunctions against putting the public charge rule into effect came from Judge Phyllis J. Hamilton of the Federal District Court in Northern California and Judge Rosanna M

The Trump administration on Monday asked the Supreme Court to allow it to move forward with a rule aimed at cutting back benefits for immigrants while litigation plays out in court.

a group of people walking in front of United States Supreme Court Building: Trump asks Supreme Court to let immigrant 'public charge' rule take effect© Greg Nash Trump asks Supreme Court to let immigrant 'public charge' rule take effect

The Justice Department, on behalf of the administration, asked the justices to lift a nationwide halt on President Trump's "public charge" rule that links immigrants' legal status to their use of public benefits.

The move came after a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit last week kept in place a nationwide injunction entered by a federal district judge in New York.

U.S. court blocks Trump from enforcing 'public charge' immigration rule

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The rule affects people who receive most forms of Medicaid, food stamps and housing vouchers. That decision by the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, however, didn't have an immediate practical effect because the policy is still on hold due to nationwide rulings in two separate federal courts .

Two similar injunctions were lifted last month by federal appeals courts in Virginia and California. But the injunction from the New York-based federal court continues to apply across the country.

Under the Trump policy, an immigrant would be considered a public charge, or dependent, for receiving at least one public benefit such as Medicaid or food stamps for more than 12 months within any three-year period.

At issue in the case is whether the Trump administration has the proper authority to expand the definition of who is considered a public charge.

The rule represents a more stringent approach to a long-standing immigration law than those taken by recent administrations and is likely to make it harder for some immigrants to obtain a green card to reside permanently in the U.S.

The policy was quickly challenged in court, leading to several nationwide injunctions before it could take effect.

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