•   
  •   
  •   

US Kentucky coal miners block train carrying coal shipment, claim they're owed pay

13:05  14 january  2020
13:05  14 january  2020 Source:   foxnews.com

U.S. states must target gas, oil use to meet climate goals – report

  U.S. states must target gas, oil use to meet climate goals – report Ten U.S. states, led by New York, California and Illinois, account for 56% of carbon emissions from buildings nationwide, a major source of greenhouse gas emissions that needs to be tackled over the next decade to combat climate change, according to a report released on Monday. © Getty The U.S. Capitol is seen through American flags flying at half staff in Washington, D.C., U.S.

Nearly three weeks later, the coal train sits idle, back at the mine . Alerted by news of the Harlan standoff, the Department of Labor intervened, asking Blackjewel’s mining operations in Harlan have been bought, and the new owners have pledged to pay the miners some of the money they are owed .

Coal miners in Kentucky continue to protest their former employer by blocking a railroad track that carries coal trains , demanding back pay after being laid off last month. The protest, which started on July 29 in Cumberland, Kentucky , is in response to workers who were laid off by their former

A group of Kentuckycoal miners and their families stood on top of railroad tracks Monday and blocked a train hauling a large shipment of coal after they claimed that they were never paid for nearly a month’s worth of work, according to reports.

COAL MINERS' STRUGGLE CONTINUES AMID TRUMP PROMISES, DEMOCRATIC PLANS

The miners, who work for Quest Energy in Pike County, claim they had worked since Dec. 16 without being paid. About 50 miners employed at the mine are owed for three weeks of work, the group at the track in Kimper told the Lexington Herald-Leader.

“They won’t get their coal until we’re paid,” Kenny Collins, who operates a shuttle car at the underground mine, said. He said his power was cut off Monday, and he is owed more than $3,000.

America's Coal Consumption Entered Free Fall in 2019

  America's Coal Consumption Entered Free Fall in 2019 Coal fell 18 percent last year, the largest drop ever recorded. But carbon emissions across the rest of the economy barely budged.The bad news is almost everything else. Outside of the power sector, the country’s planet-warming pollution continued to grow last year. Almost three decades after climate change first became a political issue, the American economy remains a continent-sized machine that guzzles fossil fuels and excretes money.

A coal train passes through Waddy, Kentucky . Photograph: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty “The pay scale around here is ridiculous because coalminers , they deserve their pay , but there is no They have no intention of backing down until they ’ re paid what they ’ re owed . “We’re going to stay

Miners have blocked a train in Kentucky loaded with coal . The protest is over a dispute with the coal company that filed for bankruptcy and left miners "We' re doing without money, food and everything else before our kids are starting back to school. We can't even get clothes or nothing else for them , so

Some claimed that they worked a 17-hour shift Thursday, expecting to receive a paycheck Friday, but the check never came, WYMT-TV reported. They said the mine then told them they would be paid Monday but the date was pushed back again.

The American Resource Corporation, which owns Quest Energy, issued a statement about the delay in workers’ pay but also refuted some of the protesters’ claims.

Protests and outrage as Siemens backs Aussie mine project

  Protests and outrage as Siemens backs Aussie mine project Environmental activists across the world slammed German engineering conglomerate Siemens on Monday after it decided to carry on with a controversial coal mine project in Australia. After holding talks with environmentalists in Berlin last week, CEO Joe Kaeser said Sunday that Siemens would go ahead with plans to provide rail infrastructure for the Carmichael mine in Queensland.

— Some Kentucky coal miners and their families stood on train tracks Monday to prevent a train Miners told the station they expected to be paid Friday, then were told to wait until Monday, when Miners at the tracks told the Lexington Herald-Leader about 50 miners are owed for three weeks of

(PIKEVILLE, Ky.) — Some Kentucky coal miners and their families stood on train tracks Monday to prevent a train loaded with coal from leaving, saying Miners at the tracks told the Lexington Herald-Leader about 50 miners are owed for three weeks of work. “ They won’t get their coal until we’ re paid

“Some of the employees are behind 8 days and some 1 day on their payday. They will all be paid as we don’t take this lightly. They have been paid since the 16th, so we are not sure where that number is coming from,” the statement said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

“We do not work men 17 hours as stated. We work a very normal mining schedule. We value the employees greatly for their work and their future work. Given challenging markets we are focused on ensuring the longevity of the employment for all the men and women of our organization.”

The company did not immediately respond to an after-hours email from Fox News.

Miners last summer in Harlan County held a similar protest when Blackjewel filed bankruptcy. The miners eventually were given a deal to be paid and let the train pass

Coal states ask Supreme Court to overturn Washington coal terminal ban .
Coal states ask Supreme Court to overturn Washington coal terminal banWyoming Governor Mark Gordon, a Republican, announced the challenge under the court's rarely used "original jurisdiction" provision that enables the justices to hear certain disputes between states before a review by lower courts.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!