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US Florida Python Bowl: Hunters put the squeeze on 80 snakes

06:25  26 january  2020
06:25  26 january  2020 Source:   cnn.com

Google launches online coding course to train workers for tech jobs

  Google launches online coding course to train workers for tech jobs The news comes as Silicon Valley faces scrutiny over the implications of the tech industry on the American workforce.The program, called the Google IT Automation With Python Professional Certificate, will be available through the online education service Coursera. It'll be a six-course program in beginner-level Python, which will culminate in a final capstone project focused on programming for automation.

So, South Florida 's largest property holder put together a program to assemble python hunters . Today, they celebrated their 1,000th capture. "If you go to Everglades National Park and you were to go there in the 70's and 80 's, you'd see lots of squirrels and raccoons and opossums and all the wildlife

So, South Florida 's largest property holder put together a program to assemble python hunters . Today, they celebrated their 1,000th capture. "If you go to Everglades National Park and you were to go there in the 70's and 80 's, you'd see lots of squirrels and raccoons and opossums and all the wildlife

a group of baseball players standing on top of a grass covered field: A  Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission member gave a demonstration before the contest.© Joe Raedle/Getty Images A Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission member gave a demonstration before the contest.

Once again, we have a winner in the annual contest of your dreams -- your very, very bad dreams, that is.

More than 750 people from 20 states turned up for Florida's 2020 Python Bowl, catching 80 of the giant invasive snakes, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said in a release.

The grand prize winner in the 10-day contest is Mike Kimmel, who caught eight Burmese pythons, the commission said Saturday. His prize was a Tracker 570 Off Road all-terrain vehicle.

'It was going for my throat': Florida python hunters wrestle invasive snakes

  'It was going for my throat': Florida python hunters wrestle invasive snakes 'It was going for my throat': Florida python hunters wrestle invasive snakes"I knew what it was doing, it was going for my throat," said the 54-year-old Florida Army National Guard major who was able to wrestle free during that incident in the summer of 2018. "I said to myself, 'It can't go down like this.

State and local leaders joined the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the South Florida Pythons wrap around their prey and squeeze it to death. Edman then used a hook on the end of Python trapper Tom Rahill said the next 10 days might make for a slow hunt because of the

Burmese pythons ( Python bivittatus) are native to Southeast Asia. However, since the end of the 20th century, they have become an established breeding population in South Florida .

One contestant, Tom Rahill, caught the longest, a beast of 12 feet, 7.3 inches, and the heaviest, a 62-pounder. He won $4,000 for his efforts.

Florida holds the contest every year in an effort to put the squeeze on the non-venomous constrictor. Conservationists say the reptiles, estimated to number in the tens of thousands in the Everglades, pose a threat to native wildlife.

Raccoon populations, for example, dropped more than 99% from 1997 to 2012 in the areas where the pythons have been the longest, according to the US Geological Survey.

The Burmese python is one of the most worrying of invasive species in the state and can now be found across more than 1,000 square miles in South Florida, according to the USGS.

If you missed your chance to show off your snake-wrangling skills in the contest, relax. It's legal to hunt pythons any time on private lands with the landowner's permission, the FWC said, and the commission will even teach you how to do it.

Missing kayaker in Florida Everglades found alive in dramatic rescue video after days adrift .
A kayaker who disappeared during a week-long solo trip in the Florida Everglades was rescued Monday after days floating on his back in the chilly waters, authorities said. Mark Miele, 67, of Virginia, was due back on Jan. 29, seven days after he embarked on the kayaking trip in Everglades National Park, but never returned, the Collier County Sheriff’s Office wrote on Facebook. Four days later, National Park Service rangers found a bag containing his wallet and phone washed up on the bank of the Lopez River.

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