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US Air Force updates dress code to clear process for turbans, hijabs

19:40  14 february  2020
19:40  14 february  2020 Source:   thehill.com

Air Force updates its dress code policy to include turbans, beards and hijabs

  Air Force updates its dress code policy to include turbans, beards and hijabs Under the new guidelines, Sikhs and Muslims can seek a religious accommodation to serve with their articles of faith and expect to be approved, except under extremely limited circumstances. The final review for the accommodation must take place within 30 days for cases in the United States, and 60 days for all other cases, according to the guidelines. And for the most part, airmen can expect the religious accommodation to follow them through their career.

The Air Force's dress code has been updated to clear the way for an approval process for Sikhs and Muslims that would allow them to wear their articles of faith while serving.

a plane sitting on top of a car: Air Force updates dress code to clear process for turbans, hijabs © Getty Air Force updates dress code to clear process for turbans, hijabs

Finalized last week, the new code lets Sikhs and Muslims in the Air Force seek a religious accommodation that will allow turbans, beards, unshorn hair and hijabs, with the expectation that they'll be approved as long as their appearance is "neat and conservative," CNN reports.

Before the new policy, Sikhs and Muslims who served in the Air Force could be granted religious accommodation only by a case-by-case basis, and the process could be overly slow.

The new guidelines set a benchmark for the process and set a concrete timeline for approval.

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