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US Mississippi flooding: Up to 1,000 homes feared affected

05:45  18 february  2020
05:45  18 february  2020 Source:   nbcnews.com

Flooding threatens parts of the US as rain-soaked states get deluged again

  Flooding threatens parts of the US as rain-soaked states get deluged again In the Southeast, rainfall over the past month is as much as 200-300% above normal. That's especially bad because the ground is already saturated, making flooding much more likely. The Pehlham, Alabama, Police Department posted video footage of flooding after Monday's rain.In Mississippi, the state's emergency management agency was on the scene of a potential levee failure in Yazoo County Tuesday, the agency posted on Facebook. And flooded roads contribute to many weather-related deaths, as drivers attempting to cross flooded roads get stuck or washed away.

Mississippi flooding : 'Helpless feeling' as up to 1 , 000 homes feared affected . While the swollen Pearl River has crested, at its third-highest The National Weather Service in Jackson, Mississippi , says that another 1 to 2 inches of rainfall is expected and that flooding — and flash flooding — is

MISSISSIPPI locals are bracing for catastrophic flooding in what threatens to be one of the most severe Law enforcement officials went door to door in affected areas, telling people to evacuate "This is a historic, unprecedented flood ," Reeves tweeted on Saturday. More than 2,400 homes and

a truck is parked in the water: Image:© Rogelio V. Solis Image:

Saturated by days of heavy rain, Mississippi’s Pearl River crested Monday and water levels are expected to fall later this week, the National Weather Service said, but flooding in that state and Tennessee has affected hundreds of homes.

"It's just a helpless feeling," said Patrick Crews, whose Mississippi neighborhood was flooded. "You can't really do anything. You want to be around, but you can't stop the water."

The National Weather Service in Jackson, Mississippi, says that another 1 to 2 inches of rainfall is expected and that flooding — and flash flooding — is likely Tuesday through Tuesday night.

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More than 96, 000 sandbags had already been distributed by Saturday. The National Guard, the Highway Although the sun was shining Saturday in central Mississippi , Reeves and Mississippi WLBT-TV reported the move is an attempt to keep flooding to a minimum downstream, and to allow

- Mississippi braced on Saturday for what forecasters warned could be one of the worst floods to hit the central part of the state in decades, prompting officials to urge thousands to leave their homes or The flooding follows heavy rainfall and tornadoes that have already battered Mississippi this month.

"It goes without saying that it has been a long weekend for Mississippi as floodwaters have continued to rise at the Pearl River and around central Mississippi," Gov. Tate Reeves said.

The Pearl River feeds into and continues south from the Ross R. Barnett Reservoir, which is northeast of Jackson, and snakes along the capital city’s eastern side.

The river was at 36.8 feet when it was cresting Monday, which is the third-highest recorded crest. Its highest recorded crest was 43.2 feet on April 17, 1979, and the second-highest occurred May 5, 1983, when the river rose to 39.58 feet.

Hundreds of homes have been affected and that number could grow to close to 1,000, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency Executive Director Gregory S. Michel said at a news conference.

As Floods Spread in Mississippi, Officials Say the Worst Is Still Ahead

  As Floods Spread in Mississippi, Officials Say the Worst Is Still Ahead FLOWOOD, Miss. — The authorities in charge of the dam that regulates the flow of water from a sprawling reservoir into the Pearl River strained to hold off the inevitable. Downstream from the dam were winding roads packed with mobile homes, subdivisions with tidy rows of brick houses, and farther along, the heart of Mississippi’s state government in Jackson. The dam, built mainly for water supply purposes, also helped to keep those areas from flooding. But there had been days of torrential rain, and the Ross R. Barnett Reservoir, a 33,000-acre lake northeast of Jackson, was filling to the brim. Sooner or later, officials cautioned, something would have to give.

Forecasters in Mississippi are bracing for what could be one of the most devastating floods in the state's history, as days of heavy downpours stoke fears that a river in the state capital All told, about 1 , 000 homes are expected to be impacted by flooding , affecting up to 3, 000 people, Reeves said.

Forecasters in Mississippi are bracing for what could be one of the most devastating floods in the state’s history, as days of heavy downpours stoke fears that a river in the state capital All told, about 1 , 000 homes are expected to be impacted by flooding , affecting up to 3, 000 people, Reeves said.

Officials said Monday they were not aware of any reports of injuries.

Law enforcement and others have been going door-to-door to tell people to evacuate, and officials have performed 16 assisted evacuations, Reeves said.

Chris Sharp had enough time to find an 18-wheeler, load it with his possessions and drive away Friday from the house his parents bought in the 1970s. The house was inundated in those previous two flood years. On Monday, he tried to go back with a boat, but a police officer turned him away.

"All you can do is just sit back and watch,” Sharp told The Associated Press by phone from his brother’s nearby house.

a person sitting next to a body of water: Image: John and Jina Smith paddle away from their Flowood, Miss., home, as Pearl River floodwaters enter their hous© Rogelio V. Solis Image: John and Jina Smith paddle away from their Flowood, Miss., home, as Pearl River floodwaters enter their hous

Flash flood watches and flood warnings covered parts of central Mississippi on Monday evening, and a flood warning continued along the Tennessee River in that state, according to the weather service.

Tennessee landslide sends 2 large homes tumbling into rain-swollen river on video

  Tennessee landslide sends 2 large homes tumbling into rain-swollen river on video A landslide sent two large homes plummeting into the rain-swollen Tennessee River on Sunday, video posted on Facebook by a local fire department showed, but fortunately, nobody was reported hurt. © Hardin County Fire Department, Savannah TennesseeOne of the homes in Savannah, Tenn., a two-hour drive east of Memphis, made cracking and snapping sounds and showed sparks of electricity as it slid into the river.Only one of the two homes was occupied when the threat of a landslide became imminent -- and rescuers said the homeowners evacuated ahead of time.

Some 2, 000 buildings including 1 , 000 homes were likely to be affected by the third highest level for the Pearl River on record, Reeves said. Barriers were set up to keep major roads from flooding and officials distributed 146, 000 sandbags for people to protect their homes .

More than 17, 000 Jackson-area residents were forced from their homes . The flood was among the most costly and devastating to ever occur in Mississippi A majority of those homes and businesses are in Northeast Jackson near the river. That number represents apartment complexes as well, said

Reeves said that while there was relatively good news in the Jackson and central Mississippi area, “we as a state are not in the clear yet."

He urged people to not walk or drive in floodwaters and to heed evacuation areas and to stay away until given the clear from officials. "We do expect the water to recede relatively quickly over the next two to three days, but as it is receding it is going to be fast-flowing water,” the governor said.

Tennessee has also been dealing with flooding. The fire department in Hardin County, in the southern part of the state, posted drone video taken Sunday on Facebook showing houses destroyed after land collapsed along the Tennessee River. One of the two homes was occupied but had been evacuated.

The Hardin County Fire Department on Sunday shared aerial video showing homes along the river inundated, some up to their rooftops. Hardin County is around 100 miles east of Memphis.

"It absolutely kills you, knowing that" houses are getting destroyed downstream from the dam at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Pickwick Reservoir, TVA spokesman Jim Hopson told the AP. He said that February's rains have been "400 percent of normal, and we have more coming in this week. It's kind of a never-ending battle."

Reeves, Mississippi's Republican governor, said that President Donald Trump called him Monday and offered assistance from the federal government. "Mississippi has a true friend in President Trump," Reeves tweeted.

Black ice causing hazardous travel conditions across Southeast in quick-hitting winter storm .
A winter storm is bringing dangerous road conditions and black ice for drivers Friday morning in the Southeast.The National Weather service warned of hazardous travel conditions through the morning hours due to snow and ice buildup on roadways in south central portions of Virginia and northeast North Carolina.

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