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US House to take historic vote to make lynching a federal crime

14:10  26 february  2020
14:10  26 february  2020 Source:   cnn.com

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Lawmakers in the House of Representatives are set to cast a historic vote this week to designate lynching as a federal crime . House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced last week that the House on Wednesday will take up HR 35, anti- lynching legislation introduced in the House by

House to vote on legislation making lynching a federal crime . WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers in the House of Representatives are set to cast a historic vote this week to designate lynching as a federal crime .

Lawmakers will take a historic vote on Wednesday when the House of Representatives takes up legislation to make lynching a federal crime.

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The House will vote on HR 35, anti-lynching legislation introduced by Democratic Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois, called the Emmett Till Antilynching Act. Fourteen-year-old Till was brutally murdered in a racist attack in Mississippi in 1955, an event that drew national attention to the atrocities and violence that African Americans have faced in the United States and became a civil rights rallying cry.

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WASHINGTON — Lawmakers in the House of Representatives are set to cast a historic vote this week to designate lynching as a federal crime . House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced last week that the House on Wednesday will take up HR 35, anti- lynching legislation introduced in the

The Senate voted to make lynching a federal crime Wednesday, 153 years after the end of the Civil War. The bill, passed by unanimous consent, was Harris pointed out that Congress has previously tried to pass anti- lynching legislation over 200 times. While the House has passed anti- lynching bills

The measure that the House will take up on Wednesday, however, will be amended prior to a vote on final passage to sync up with anti-lynching legislation that has already passed the Senate.

The Senate bill, called the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act, makes lynching a federal crime by establishing it as a new criminal civil rights violation. The legislation would amend federal civil rights law to explicitly include provisions on lynching.

It passed the Senate last year by a unanimous vote and was sponsored by the Senate's three black members: Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris of California, Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina.

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House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced last week that the House on Wednesday will take up HR 35, anti- lynching legislation introduced in Last year, the Senate passed via unanimous consent the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act, which made lynching a federal crime by establishing it as a

The Senate on Thursday cleared legislation to make lynching a federal crime . Kamala Harris Kamala Devi Harris House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime "Justice for the victims of lynching has been too long denied, and as we look forward we must collectively in this

A senior Democratic aide told CNN on Monday that the House bill would be amended to carry the language of the Senate bill, but would keep the House's title in honor of Till.

The House vote is expected to pave the way for the anti-lynching legislation to ultimately go to President Donald Trump for his signature, although the exact process for reconciling the two bills so that a final version can be sent to the White House is not yet clear.

The bills will still have different titles and numbers, meaning that additional action will be necessary in one of the two chambers before the legislation can go to the President's desk. The Senate, for example, may next need to take up the House-passed legislation and approve it before it goes to the White House.

The aide said that discussions are ongoing about how the legislation will be sent to the President after the House vote.

It is expected to pass the House with at least a two-thirds majority since it is being considered under a process used in the lower chamber for legislation with broad, bipartisan support.

The text of the legislation outlines the violent and racist legacy of lynching in the United States and the many earlier, and unsuccessful, attempts to enact federal anti-lynching legislation into law.

"The crime of lynching succeeded slavery as the ultimate expression of racism in the United States following Reconstruction," the bill states, adding that "at least 4,742 people, predominantly African Americans, were reported lynched in the United States between 1882 and 1968."

The bill notes that "nearly 200 anti-lynching bills were introduced in Congress during the first half of the 20th century," and "between 1890 and 1952, 7 presidents petitioned Congress to end lynching."

The legislation states, "Only by coming to terms with history can the United States effectively champion human rights abroad."

Four Lawmakers Vote Against Bill to Outlaw Lynching, Cite Gov Overreach .
"A crime is a crime, and all victims deserve equal justice," GOP Rep. Thomas Massie said. "Adding enhanced penalties for 'hate' tends to endanger other liberties such as freedom of speech."Three Republicans voted against the measure: GOP members Ted Yoho of Florida, Louie Gohmert of Texas and Thomas Massie of Virginia. The chamber's lone Independent, Justin Amash of Michigan—who famously switched from Republican to Independent over his support for impeaching President Donald Trump—also voted no.

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