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US Emmett Till bill making lynching a federal crime passes House

23:01  26 february  2020
23:01  26 february  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

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A House bill that would make lynching a federal crime was named for Emmett Till , who was lynched by a white mob in Mississippi in 1955 Since at least 1900, members of the House and Senate have tried to pass a law making lynching a federal crime . To date, they have not succeeded.

The House on Wednesday passed a bill that would make lynching a federal hate crime , a major victory for advocates who have long sought to address “We’re finally poised to pass the Emmett Till Antilynching Act in the House today.” Rush added that he had been assured by Senate sponsors that

A bill to make lynching a hate crime under federal law passed the House on Wednesday, making it the first attempt since 1900 poised to successfully make its way through Congress.

Emmett Till wearing a black hat: An undated photo shows Emmett Louis Till, whose body was found in the Tallahatchie River near the Delta community of Money, Miss., Aug. 31, 1955. © AP, FILE An undated photo shows Emmett Louis Till, whose body was found in the Tallahatchie River near the Delta community of Money, Miss., Aug. 31, 1955.

The legislature is titled the Emmett Till Anti-lynching Act, an ode to Till, a 14-year-old African American boy who was kidnapped, beaten and lynched in 1955 after he was accused of whistling at a white woman.

The vote was 410-4. The members who voted against were Independent Rep. Justin Amash and Republican Reps. Louie Gohmert, Thomas Massie and Ted Yoho.

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Bobby Rush of Illinois called the Emmett Till Antilynching Act. Fourteen-year-old Till was brutally The Senate has already passed its own anti- lynching legislation, and the House vote is expected to "To heal past and present racial injustice, Congress must make lynching a federal crime so our

Senate Passes Bill That Makes Lynching a Federal Crime . The bill , which was introduced in June by Sens. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Tim Scott (R-S.C.), had previously passed in the Senate in December, but did not pass in the GOP-majority House before the end of the 115th

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., who introduced the bill in January 2019, said it will finally outlaw "an American evil."

"Today, we send a strong message that violence -- and race-based violence, in particular -- has no place in America," Rush said in a statement.

He spoke about his decision to name the bill after Till, saying the boy was from his district in Chicago and that the now-iconic image of him in his casket "created an indelible imprint on my brain, on my spirit."

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"It made me conscious of the risk, the trepidation of being a black man in America," Rush said at a press conference.

The bill describes lynching as an act willfully done by a collection of people who assemble with the intent to commit violence on another human and then cause that person's death, according to a copy of the bill.

Congress makes lynching a federal crime, 65 years after Till

  Congress makes lynching a federal crime, 65 years after Till Sixty-five years after 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi, Congress has approved legislation designating lynching as a hate crime under federal law. The bill, introduced by Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush and named after Till, comes 120 years after Congress first considered anti-lynching legislation and after dozens of similar efforts were defeated.

The Senate approved a bill on Wednesday that would make lynching a federal crime after more than a century of such attempts to outlaw the act.

Bobby Rush of Illinois called the Emmett Till Antilynching Act. Fourteen-year-old Till was brutally The Senate has already passed its own anti- lynching legislation, and the House vote is expected to “To heal past and present racial injustice, Congress must make lynching a federal crime so our

Bobby Rush, Steny Hoyer, Karen Bass, Emmett Till posing for the camera: House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md. during a news conference to discuss the © J. Scott Applewhite/AP House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md. during a news conference to discuss the "Emmett Till Antilynching Act" which would designate lynching as a hate crime under federal law, on Capitol Hill, Feb. 26, 2020

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer classified lynching as "the premeditated, extrajudicial killing by a mob or group of people to instill fear."

"Lyching is a blot on the history of America, but the even greater blot is the silence that for too long maintained in the context of what people knew was happening," he said at the press conference, calling the bill "long overdue."

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Lynchings were used in the U.S., predominantly in the South, from the 1880s to 1960s to terrorize black Americans. From 1882-1968, 4,743 lynchings occurred in the U.S., with 3,446 involving victims who were black, according to the NAACP.

Four Lawmakers Vote Against Bill to Outlaw Lynching, Cite Gov Overreach

  Four Lawmakers Vote Against Bill to Outlaw Lynching, Cite Gov Overreach "A crime is a crime, and all victims deserve equal justice," GOP Rep. Thomas Massie said. "Adding enhanced penalties for 'hate' tends to endanger other liberties such as freedom of speech."Three Republicans voted against the measure: GOP members Ted Yoho of Florida, Louie Gohmert of Texas and Thomas Massie of Virginia. The chamber's lone Independent, Justin Amash of Michigan—who famously switched from Republican to Independent over his support for impeaching President Donald Trump—also voted no.

lynching a federal hate crime , House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) announced Thursday. C. Dyer of Missouri introduced the first antilynching legislation to pass the House , but tragically, that bill would The bill is named for Emmett Till , the 14-year-old African American boy who was lynched in

The bill previously passed the Senate in December, but it did not clear the then-GOP controlled House before the end of the 115th Congress. When you realize that Kamala was trying to pass an "anti- lynching " bill just as her friend Smollett lied that two Trump supporters tried to lynch him

"This form of terrorism was used to kill black people and terrorize and terrify those into understanding they were not considered humans," Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., said at the press conference.

She notes that though there are fewer lynchings in recent history, there have been recent reports of nooses drawn in classrooms and locker rooms.

"A vicious reminder that the past isn't ever that far away," Bass said.

The bill had bipartisan support.

Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., said "this will ensure that those who engage in mob violence are held accountable."

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Rush said it is expected to pass the Senate by the end of the week, before the end of Black History Month, and then makes its way to the Oval Office.

Asked if they believed Trump would sign the bill, Bass said, "How could he not?"

ABC News' Katherine Faulders contributed to this report.

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