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US Pulitzer winners reflect the year of Trump, Putin and opioids

23:52  10 april  2017
23:52  10 april  2017 Source:   usatoday.com

Kremlin spokesman suggests meeting between Trump, Putin

  Kremlin spokesman suggests meeting between Trump, Putin A spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin said the leader is looking to meet with President Trump to continue to build their relationship.Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Friday that Putin and Trump should "meet each other and exchange views" in order to boost the relationship between the two nations, in an interview with ABC's "This Week" with George Stephanopoulos.

The campaign of President Trump , America's opioid epidemic and the tragic fire at an Oakland warehouse were among the topics that earned those who covered them Pulitzer Prizes on Monday. Journalism's pre-eminent awards went to coverage of Trump 's improbable run to the White House

The Pulitzer Prizes. Honoring excellence in journalism and the arts since 1917. © The Pulitzer Prizes — Columbia University, 709 Pulitzer Hall, 2950 Broadway, New York, NY 10027.

The 2017 Pulitzer Prizes for journalism reflected the dominant themes of past year: the nation's opioid epidemic, Trump's candidacy and Putin's power. © Getty Images/iStockphoto The 2017 Pulitzer Prizes for journalism reflected the dominant themes of past year: the nation's opioid epidemic, Trump's candidacy and Putin's power.

SAN FRANCISCO — The candidacy of President Trump, America's opioid epidemic and the tragic fire at an Oakland warehouse were among the topics that earned journalists and their news organizations Pulitzer Prizes on Monday.

Journalism's pre-eminent awards went to coverage of Trump's improbable run to the White House (The Washington Post's David Fahrenthold for national reporting that cast doubt on the generosity of the Trump Foundation, and the Wall Street Journal's Peggy Noonan for commentary on the nation's divisive presidential campaign); the flood of addictive opioids into depressed West Virginia counties, leading to fatal overdoses (Eric Eyre of the Charleston (W. Va.) Gazette-Mail for investigative reporting); and the Ghost Ship fire in Oakland that killed 36 people (East Bay Times staff for Breaking News).

Trump offers condolences to Putin after St. Petersburg blast

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The Pulitzer Prizes on Monday honored The Washington Post for hard-hitting reporting on Donald Trump 's presidential campaign and The New York Times for revealing Vladimir Putin 's covert power grab, praising their probing of powerful people despite a hostile climate for the news media.

This Year ’s Pulitzer Prize Winners Are a Great Reflection of Life in Trump ’s America. Fahrenthold was the reporter who first broke Trump ’s Access Hollywood tape; he spent months investigating Trump ’s fraudulent philanthropy; he was also referred to by Trump himself as a “nasty guy,” which

USA TODAY Network, in its first full year of operation, was a finalist in the investigative reporting category for Dishonor Roll, a series on abusive teachers, led by Steve Reilly. It was the first time USA TODAY  was recognized as a Pulitzer finalist in the investigative reporting category. 

The big winner was the New York Times, with three: Its staff's international coverage of Russia President Vladimir Putin's tentacles of power globally, feature writing for C.J. Chivers on a Marine's postwar descent into violence, and breaking news photography of the Philippines for a government assault on drug dealers and users (freelance photographer Daniel Berehulak).

Among the other 14 winners in the journalism category: 

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An investigation into Donald Trump ’s election campaign by The Washington Post and a series of articles by The New York Times on president Vladimir Putin ’s efforts to project Russia power The 19-member Pulitzer board is made up of past winners and other distinguished journalists and academics.

A look back at 12 months of spreading authoritarianism and huge egos the world over, with Beijing and Moscow making the most of weak and volatile US leadership.

— Explanatory Reporting: International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy and Miami Herald (Panama Papers coverage).

— Editorial Writing: Art Cullen of the The Storm Lake Times, a tiny, family-run newspaper in Iowa, on powerful corporate agricultural interests in Iowa.

— Public Service: New York Daily News and Pro Publica on widespread abuse of eviction rules by the police.

— Local Reporting: Salt Lake Tribune staff for the mistreatment of sexual assault victims at Brigham Young University. 

Pulitzer Prize Administrator Mike Pride announced the winners, which were broadcast live on YouTube. The announcement coincided with the 170th birthday of newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer, for whom they are named.

The 101st edition of the Pulitzers, awarded at Columbia University in New York, underscored roiling changes — and uncertainty about the country's immediate future.

Follow USA TODAY's San Francisco Bureau Chief Jon Swartz @jswartz on Twitter.

Kremlin: No reason to believe gays abused in Chechnya .
<p>Vladimir Putin's spokesman says the Russian president has no reason to doubt the Chechen leader's assurances.</p>Spokesman Dmitry Peskov also told journalists on Thursday that investigators have found no evidence to back up reports by the Novaya Gazeta newspaper this month that police in the predominantly Muslim republic in southern Russia rounded up more than 100 men suspected of homosexuality and that at least three of them were killed.

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