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US 'Massive eruption,' like Minneapolis protests, is what drives change: Experts

04:05  30 may  2020
04:05  30 may  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Gov. Walz activating National Guard amid protests, looting after death of George Floyd

  Gov. Walz activating National Guard amid protests, looting after death of George Floyd Gov. Tim Walz signed an executive order Thursday, activating the Minnesota National Guard as Minneapolis, St. Paul and Oakdale have been beset by protests in the wake of the killing of George Floyd in police custody. Looting has erupted at various locations in St. Paul and Minneapolis. “Local leaders have requested National Guard resources after […]Looting has erupted at various locations in St. Paul and Minneapolis.

As Minneapolis suffers its third day of massive looting, burning and rioting, some commentators believe the behavior can be justified as justice for the death of George Floyd. What must happen is that the four officers responsible for Floyd’s death be punished to the fullest extent of the law.

Minneapolis (CNN) State police in body armor and riot gear lined up Friday morning near the Minneapolis police precinct that was set Large crowds gathered in communities across the country, even as experts warned people to continue to avoid big gatherings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

This is what it takes to be heard.

a group of people on a stage in front of a crowd: Protestors demonstrate outside of a burning Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct, May 28, 2020, in Minneapolis. © John Minchillo/AP Protestors demonstrate outside of a burning Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct, May 28, 2020, in Minneapolis.

That is the sentiment shared by a protester, sociologist and historian on the protests that have erupted and caused destruction in Minneapolis over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was seen in a disturbing video pinned down by a white police officer. That officer, identified as Derek Chauvin, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter on Friday.

Protesters have been calling for an end to police brutality against black Americans -- and, simply, to be heard in their calls against racism. These are calls that have been made before.

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  9 Arrested In Violent Fontana Police Protests The protesters threw rocks at businesses and passing cars, police said.The protests also came after an incident earlier in the day in which a man was shot and killed by Fontana police after he allegedly attacked an officer and a police K9 with a crowbar following a standoff. The suspect had also attacked a disabled man prior to their arrival, police said.

A Minneapolis auto parts store was seen nearly engulfed in flames on Wednesday night, with a column of black smoke pouring out of the building after Multiple unconfirmed reports of additional fires were also heard on police scanners, with smoke reportedly billowing out of a Target store that was looted

Minneapolis is in the middle of a third night of unrest in the aftermath of George Floyd's death, with protesters apparently taking over the police department's 3rd Precinct building late Thursday. CBS Minnesota has the latest.

"[Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback] Colin Kaepernick bent his knee on American soil, on the gridiron. He was blackballed. That was peaceful," Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, a professor of sociology at Georgetown University, told ABC News. Kaepernick drew national attention for kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality against people of color, and since the end of the 2016 season, he has remained unsigned, despite a successful stint with the 49ers.

Colin Kaepernick, Nate Boyer in uniform: San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, center, kneels during the National Anthem before an NFL preseason football game against the San Diego Chargers in San Diego, Sept. 1, 2016. © Chris Carlson/AP San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, center, kneels during the National Anthem before an NFL preseason football game against the San Diego Chargers in San Diego, Sept. 1, 2016.

"When black basketball players wore 'I can't breathe' T-shirts, that was peaceful," Dyson continued. "When black people stand up daily and protest one injustice after the other, that's peaceful."

Before Floyd death, activists saw progress on police reforms

  Before Floyd death, activists saw progress on police reforms MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Years of dialogue about police and criminal justice reforms in Minneapolis had improved the relationship between the African American community and law enforcement, activists say — before the police killing this week of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who died after a white officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes as he pleaded for air. Floyd's death and footage of the officer pressing a knee into his neck for several minutes have unleashed protests and violent clashes with law enforcement — exposing simmering frustration and the fact that there’s much work still ahead, several advocates and leaders told The

Fires erupt at protests in Minneapolis over George Floyd's death. Police: UConn senior arrested Minneapolis (CNN) Hundreds remained on the streets of Minneapolis late Wednesday night "We will demand and ultimately force lasting change by shining a light on treatment that is horrific and

Now the protests have spilled over into violence. There have been scenes of chaos in multiple cities, from Denver to New York. Amid the chaos, the CNN camera crew who were reporting from the scene were arrested in Minneapolis as they were broadcasting live on air.

"But we can't be heard," he said. "The perception is when we are peaceful and demanding our rights, America simply won't hear."

MORE: Death of George Floyd sparks conversation about race, violence and protests

Dyson said Floyd's death underscored that the lives of black people "don't matter and America finds us expendable."

'History shows that it often takes that to fully get the attention of officials'

Gov. Tim Walz called the protests in the last two days, which have included fires and looting, "reckless." He said it was imperative that order be restored in order to battle real issues.

Dr. Heather Thompson, a professor of history and African American studies at the University of Michigan, laughed at Walz's comments when asked about them by ABC News.

"I laugh because that is taken straight from a very, very long historical playbook," Thompson said. "Every federal, state or local official in American history, when faced with protests that turn particularly chaotic, always say that this is not really a protest. That these are 'thugs,' that these are 'troublemakers.'"

49ers donating $1 million to help make ‘impactful change’ after George Floyd’s death, mass protests

  49ers donating $1 million to help make ‘impactful change’ after George Floyd’s death, mass protests The San Francisco 49ers are donating $1 million to both local and national organizations helping to make societal change in the wake of George Floyd’s death and the massive protests that followed across the country, owner and CEO Jed York announced on Saturday night. “The 49ers organization is committing to support the legislative priorities of the Players Coalition and is donating $1 million to local and national organizations who are creating change." (AP/Marcio Jose Sanchez) pic.twitter.com/TCOXYhu1EQ— Jed York (@JedYork) May 31, 2020“People throughout our country are hurting,” York said in a statement. “Emotions are raw, and rightfully so.

Protests erupted in the city after the arrest and death of 46-year-old George Floyd, which many saw as the latest example of police brutality against Video posted to social media shows flames engulfing an auto parts dealership and a half-built apartment complex in Minneapolis early on Thursday morning.

What is the latest in Minneapolis ? On Thursday, protesters gathered outside the police department's 3rd Precinct, which is near where Mr Floyd died and has been the epicentre of the unrest.

a group of people in uniform: Police force protestors from the business district into nearby neighborhoods, on Aug. 11, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri. © Scott Olson/Getty Images Police force protestors from the business district into nearby neighborhoods, on Aug. 11, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri.

President Donald Trump referred to the protesters as "thugs" on Thursday morning in a tweet, a word used by some to negatively describe black men. "In the 21st century, this negative imagery of Black males has frequently utilized the negative connotation of the terminology 'thug,'" according to a 2016 paper from the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

MORE: Former President Barack Obama issues statement on George Floyd

Even these conversations about protests, Thompson said, are repetitive.

"Promises have been made that people in charge are gonna address something that's wrong and they clearly are not addressing it, so the protests explode, and then there's always this huge debate about whether or not those protests are productive or unproductive," she said.

Ultimately, if history has taught people anything, Thompson said it's that "it was usually not until the massive eruption in the streets" that change came along.

Strongsville Police Investigating Rumors Of Planned Unrest

  Strongsville Police Investigating Rumors Of Planned Unrest After protests and riots broke out in Cleveland over the weekend, Strongsville police are on high alert. STRONGSVILLE, OH — After protests and riots broke out in Northeast Ohio and across the nation over the weekend, rumors began circulating that unrest could soon be headed to Strongsville. police said they have stepped up their presence throughout the city to head off any such riot. On Sunday evening, Strongsville police said they were investigating rumors of "alleged plans of unrest in our city." It is unclear if the rumors are legitimate or the product of a social media hoax, police said.

Footage that went viral showed a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on Floyd’s neck and Floyd telling officers repeatedly that he could not breathe before appearing to lose consciousness. He was later pronounced dead at Hennepin County Medical Center.

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a group of people walking in front of a sunset: People demonstrate as a business burns during rioting following the grand jury announcement in the Michael Brown case, on Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri. © Scott Olson/Getty Images People demonstrate as a business burns during rioting following the grand jury announcement in the Michael Brown case, on Nov. 24, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri.

She gave the example of the Black Lives Matter movement that emerged after protests erupted in Ferguson following the killing of Michael Brown in 2014. Police departments then began discussing body cameras and legislatures began seriously discussing criminal justice reform.

After dramatic AIDS protests in the 1980s, Thompson said, the government was pressured to think about funding treatments.

It was after riots broke out in cities in the late 1960s, particularly in Detroit and Newark, against police brutality that President Lyndon B. Johnson formed a commission to address the issue, according to Thompson.

MORE: Minnesota protest live updates: Trump speaks to Floyd's family as cop charged

"As discomforting as it, history shows that it often takes that to fully get the attention of officials," she said.

However, while incremental progress is sometimes made, protests do not always lead to sweeping change. Despite regular demonstrations in the past six years to stop the deaths of black people at the hands of law enforcement, Floyd's death is not the first such incident in 2020 to draw national attention. His death came about three months Ahmaud Arbery, who was black, was allegedly killed by two white men, one of whom was a former police officer, while out on his daily jog. About a month after that, front-line worker Breonna Taylor, who was black, was allegedly shot and killed in her home by police.

FBI Seeks Photos, Videos Of ‘Violent Instigators’ In Last Week’s Riots

  FBI Seeks Photos, Videos Of ‘Violent Instigators’ In Last Week’s Riots The FBI is asking the public’s help in identifying “violent instigators” who looted and burned buildings during nights of rioting last week following the death of George Floyd. © Provided by CBS Minnesota Twice this week, the FBI office in Minneapolis has tweeted a request for videos and photos of people engaging in the violence. In a statement, the FBI says that while it respects the First Amendment right to protest, it must also pursue those who violated federal law. The tweets offered a link to an FBI page, where citizens can give tips. Citizens can also call in tips by dialing 1-800-225-5324.

'He has to go into the police department and convince those officers that they work for the community at large'

Durham, North Carolina, Police Chief Cerelyn 'C.J.' Davis, who is also the president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, told ABC News that Floyd's death has impacted her "personally and deeply."

"I think of the many African American young men in my life. Family members and friends who have kids, my nephews and … what their perception is of law enforcement and how does this impact them," Davis said.

She said she believes the protests are not only about Floyd, but the other black men who have died at the hands of law enforcement.

a man standing in front of a store: George Floyd is pictured in an undated photo released by the office of Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump. © Courtesy Ben Crump Law George Floyd is pictured in an undated photo released by the office of Civil Rights Attorney Ben Crump.

"I think what we're seeing is people expressing their frustration that enough is enough," Davis said. "They feel like these aggressive measures are what have to happen in order to get some attention or impact."

Davis said that while she can "absolutely identify with the anger and frustration," the concern of law enforcement is to allow people to exercise their First Amendment right in a safe environment.

"Sometimes when such aggression and frustration is exhibited in this manner, we have further injuries, further loss of life, further loss of property and that is very concerning too," Davis said. "My perspective is understanding both sides of the issue."

MORE: George Floyd remembered by friends and family as hardworking 'gentle giant'

She said it will take time before the black community can trust law enforcement, but she believes Minneapolis Chief of Police Medaria Arradondo is up for the job.

Peaceful rallies in the United States call for police reforms

 Peaceful rallies in the United States call for police reforms New York, Jun 8 (Reuters) - The wave of protests in the United States against racism and police violence triggered by the killing of African American George Floyd continued on Sunday. During the marches through the metropolises, the mood of the participants was mostly cheerful and had nothing in common with the riots full of anger and violence of the past two weeks.

"He's a great leader. He's got his work cut out for him too because aside from trying to assuage the community, he has to go into the police department and convince those officers that they work for the community at large," Davis said.

'How can you ask us for patience?'

Summy Banjo, a 24-year-old who lives in Oakdale, Minnesota, attended the protests on Wednesday and Thursday night, when what had been mostly peaceful protests turned chaotic.

Banjo stood outside of the home of Chauvin on Wednesday night, two days before he was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. She told ABC News her goal was to make it clear to officials he should not be comfortable in his home.

She said it was a mostly peaceful event, but she also believes in the non-peaceful protests.

"People are standing up for themselves," she said. "Of course there are some people whose intentions aren't true … but it shouldn't take away from the fact that we are protesting and rebelling against a system."

a group of people that are standing in the dark: Protesters gather in front of a burning fast food restaurant, May 29, 2020, in Minneapolis. © John Minchillo/AP Protesters gather in front of a burning fast food restaurant, May 29, 2020, in Minneapolis.

Banjo still remembers the death of Philando Castile, who was shot to death by a Minnesota police officer in 2016. She said her own son was born the night she learned that Castile was shot and killed.

"I gave life to my son, and that day, another black man was killed," Banjo said.

She knows officials have asked for patience and civility during this time, but four years later she is asking how.

"How can you ask us for patience when time and time again, you haven't given us the accountability we want?" Banjo said. "How much time do you need?"

Johnson - UK protests "infiltrated by riot of destruction" .
© Reuters / HANNAH MCKAY Protest against the death of George Floyd, in London London (Reuters) - Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson believes that peaceful anti-racism protests in Britain infiltrated violent troublemakers. "These demonstrations have been undermined by devastation - and they are a betrayal of the cause they are supposed to serve," Johnson wrote on Twitter. Those responsible would be held accountable.

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