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US Protesters demand justice in killing of Erik Salgado, Oakland man shot by CHP

21:11  09 june  2020
21:11  09 june  2020 Source:   sfchronicle.com

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The Oakland intersection where a 23-year-old man was fatally shot by California Highway Patrol officers transformed on Monday into a rally seeking justice for Erik Salgado — the latest Bay Area man killed by law enforcement.

Signs proclaiming “Justice for Erik Salgado,” flowers and candles decorated the intersection at 98th Avenue and Cherry Street where the fatal shooting occurred Saturday night. The family, joined by hundreds of demonstrators demanding an end to police killings of black and brown people, demanded an explanation for the shooting. But officials with the CHP and Oakland police, who are investigating the shooting, remained tightlipped Tuesday.

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Salgado and his girlfriend, who survived, were shot on the 9600 block of Cherry Street at 10:46 p.m. Saturday by CHP officers who were “conducting a criminal investigation,” Oakland police have said. The victim’s family said his girlfriend is four months pregnant and that the couple has a 3-year-old daughter.

Salgado, an Oakland resident, was driving a 2018 Dodge Challenger that was among more than 70 vehicles stolen from a San Leandro car dealership last week, said Lt. Ted Henderson, a San Leandro police spokesman.

The woman, who was taken to a hospital for treatment of gunshot wounds, was reportedly in stable condition on Sunday. Officials have not provided an update on the condition of the woman’s unborn child. Salgado’s family said the woman was shot in the stomach and has been “in and out of an induced coma.”

On Monday, an Oakland police spokesperson said they are “waiting on our investigators” before releasing more information.

Officer John Fransen, spokesman for CHP’s Golden Gate Division, said he was forbidden from talking about the case because it falls under the jurisdiction of the Oakland Police Department.

“Protocol was invoked,” he said. “We’re not able to talk about it... we’re anxiously awaiting any new details.”

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf released a statement on Monday, saying the CHP, Alameda County district attorney’s office and Oakland Police Department are each conducting investigations.

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“The City of Oakland is committed to conducting a rigorous and transparent investigation into this fatal shooting that occurred in our city,” Schaaf said. in the statement.

Among the family members who marched down 98th Avenue on Monday was Salgado’s stepsister, 23-year-old Amanda Majail-Blanco, who said she wants authorities to release the names of the officers who opened fire.

“They should be up front and honest about what they did,” she said. “If they’re bold enough to kill somebody, they should be bold enough to tell us.”

Majail-Blanco said neighbors told her that officers fired more than 40 rounds during the encounter. Even though Salgado was reportedly driving a stolen vehicle, he didn’t deserve that, she said.

“Just a week ago, I was at another protest for George Floyd — just a week ago,” Majail-Blanco told the crowd. “And now here we are again.”

In the afternoon sun, drummers and dancers stepping to the beat led the pack of people chanting “Erik Salgado.” Candles and flowers were arranged at an altar that marked the spot where he died —down the street from where he lived with his mother.

The group paused at Elmhurst United Middle School on 98th Avenue where Salgado was a student. He attended Deer Valley High School in Antioch after his family moved there for a few years, said his stepdad, Farid Majail.

“He was a good person,” Majail said. “He didn’t need to go that way. Not at all.”

Majail wrapped his arm around Salgado’s mother as the two stood before the altar to their son on Monday while others passed by.

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His mother, who was home when the shooting occurred, heard the gunshots. The family had not been permitted to see the body by Monday evening.

Family members described Salgado as a good person with a big heart. He liked music and video games and played soccer while growing up. His cousin, 28-year-old Alejandro Guzmán, said Salgado used to take care of his kids.

“He was a good uncle. Always asking about them and making sure they were OK, if they needed anything,” Guzmán said. “What was the reason for the guys shooting at him?”

Majail-Blanco said the family has heard “rumors” from the neighbors, but authorities have not provided concrete information about what happened.

“He’s a product of the street like all of us are, a product of his environment,” she said. “That don’t make him a bad person, that don’t make him a criminal.”

The Salgado shooting occurred amid massive demonstrations across the Bay Area in the wake of the in-custody death of George Floyd in late May. Demonstrations also took place in San Francisco, Santa Rosa and Richmond on Monday.

San Francisco resident Sean Monterrosa, 23, was shot and killed June 2 by Vallejo police while kneeling outside a Walgreens that was reportedly burglarized. The officer who fired five shots through his windshield — identified nearly a week after the shooting — had been involved in three non-fatal shootings before. Monterrosa’s family is calling on justice in the killing and the release of body-camera footage.

Many people marching at the Salgado rally came to stand in solidarity with the family and support the broader movement for systemic change in racist policing systems.

Andreana Clay, 49, of Oakland, said she wants to send a message of black and brown unity.

“We do need to defund the police. But I think the most important thing is showing unity between black and brown and indigenous communities —that we won’t be divided,” Clay said.

Members of the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office wore Black Lives Matter shirts, held signs with the names of victims of police violence and kneeled together. “We stood for those killed by police, and to rededicate ourselves to creating real change so our communities can thrive,” public defender Mano Raju tweeted.

Matt Kawahara and Anna Bauman are San Francisco Chronicle staff writers. Email: mkawahara@sfchronicle.com; anna.bauman@sfchronicle.com

'It got ugly': What happened when Black Lives Matter protests came to small town Ohio .
In Bethel, Ohio, peaceful protesters were seen by some as no different than looters. Here, the protesters' message was a challenge to a way of life. In Bethel, peaceful protesters would be seen by some as no different than looters and rioters. They represented chaos, the problems of other people from other places.While the protesters called for police reform, complained about racism and criticized President Donald Trump, many from Bethel support the police, say racism isn’t a problem here and fly “Trump 2020” flags in their front yards.

usr: 3
This is interesting!