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US ‘You can call me a snitch’: Police dispatcher alerted supervisor to officers kneeling on George Floyd

13:55  16 june  2020
13:55  16 june  2020 Source:   washingtonpost.com

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A Minneapolis police dispatcher was so alarmed by real-time footage of George Floyd ’s violent arrest that she flagged the situation to her supervisor , telling him over the phone, “I don’t know you can call me a snitch if you want.” “I don’t know if they had to use force or not, but they got something out of

A 911 dispatcher in Minneapolis appeared to raise questions with her supervisor over how officers handled the arrest of George Floyd last month She added: “I don’t know if they needed you or not, but they haven’t said anything to me yet.” The supervisor responded that they hadn’t said anything to

After watching live footage of Minneapolis officers arresting George Floyd on May 25, a police dispatcher was concerned enough by what she saw to call a supervisor.

a group of people standing outside of a store: People remember the life of George Floyd in front of the Cup Foods in Minneapolis. © Sheila Regan for T/TWP People remember the life of George Floyd in front of the Cup Foods in Minneapolis.

“You can call me a snitch if you want to, but we had the cameras up” on Floyd’s arrest, said the unnamed dispatcher in audio released on Monday. “All of them sat on this man.”

The supervisor promised to “find out” what was happening — but it would be nearly another 15 minutes before a sergeant arrived at the scene where Officer Derek Chauvin had knelt on George Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes before his death, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

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A 911 dispatcher in Minneapolis appeared to raise questions with her supervisor over how officers handled the arrest of George Floyd last month, telling him that it " You can call me a snitch if you want," the dispatcher can be heard telling a supervisor in audio released by the city of Minneapolis.

A 911 dispatcher who apparently watched in real time as a Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee into the neck of George Floyd called a supervisor to tell him what she saw on a surveillance video “I don’t know, you can call me a snitch if you want to, but we have the cameras up for 320's call .

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The tape, part of a batch of 911 calls about Floyd’s death released by the city, raises fresh questions about how Minneapolis police reacted as horrified bystanders and their own dispatcher sounded alarms about the officers’ use of force.

One 911 caller, an off-duty firefighter who happened upon the scene while police pinned Floyd to the street, reported that the officers were making no effort to save his life.

“I literally watched police officers not take a pulse and not do anything to save a man, and I am a first responder myself, and I literally have it on video camera,” said the unnamed firefighter, according to a transcript reviewed by the Star Tribune. “I just happened to be on a walk so, this dude, this, they [expletive] killed him …”

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A police dispatcher calls her supervisor after becoming alarmed while watching George Floyd 's arrest in real time. The unnamed female dispatcher is heard saying: "I don't know, you can call me a snitch if you Former officer Derek Chauvin, who was filmed with his knee on Mr Floyd 's neck

A 911 dispatcher called a Minneapolis Police sergeant over her concern of the way officers were handling the deadly arrest of George Floyd They haven’t said anything to me yet,” the dispatcher added. The sergeant said he would look into the problem before the phone call ended with the

As Floyd’s death has sparked worldwide protests against racial injustice and police brutality, Chauvin, 44, has been charged with second- and third-degree murder. Three other officers who were on the scene face charges of felony aiding and abetting second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. All four officers have been fired.

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The newly released call from a police dispatcher suggests that even some inside the department were alarmed at what they saw unfolding outside the Cup Foods market where Floyd was accused of using a counterfeit $20 bill.

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The 911 dispatcher called the police sergeant while watching real-time footage of the May 25 incident where Floyd died in police custody. Four former Minneapolis police officers are charged in connection to Floyd ’s death. Derek Chauvin, who was seen in bystander video kneeling on Floyd ’s

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A 911 dispatcher who was apparently watching in real time as a Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee into the neck of George Floyd called a supervisor to tell him what she saw, not caring if it made her look like a “ snitch ," according to a recording of the call made public

The dispatcher watched the incident on a video feed from the network of hundreds of police cameras stationed around the city, the Star Tribune reported.

She called a supervisor around 8:30 p.m. on May 25 and spoke to him for less than a minute, according to a time stamp on the call. That’s roughly the same time when an unresponsive Floyd was loaded into an ambulance on a stretcher and then rushed to the hospital, according to a timeline of his death by The Washington Post.

The dispatcher described what she’d seen, telling the supervisor that the officers “got something out of the back of the squad, and all of them sat on this man, so I don’t know if they needed you or not, but they haven’t said anything to me yet.”

The supervisor responded, “Yeah, they haven’t said anything yet, unless it’s just a takedown, which doesn’t count, but I’ll find out.” (He was likely referring to a Minneapolis police policy that officers using approved “takedown techniques” aren’t required to notify their superiors that they used force on someone, the Associated Press reported.)

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A 911 dispatcher who was apparently watching in real time as a Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee into the neck of George Floyd called a supervisor to tell him what she saw, not caring if it "I don't know, you can call me a snitch if you want to, but we have the cameras up for 320's call .

A dispatcher who was apparently watching in real time as a Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee into the neck of George Floyd called a supervisor to tell him what she saw, not caring if it made her look like a " snitch ," according to a recording of the call made public Monday June 15, 2020.

Then, the dispatcher added, “No problem, we don’t get to ever see it, so when we see it we’re just like, well, that looks a little different, but …”

Bystanders who called 911 were more frank in their assessment of what Chauvin and the other officers had done to Floyd.

The cops “pretty much just killed this guy that wasn’t resisting arrest. He had his knee on the dude’s neck the whole time,” one caller told 911, according to a transcript reviewed by the AP.

The caller reported that Floyd had “stopped breathing” and that he “was already in handcuffs.”

He added, “I don’t even know if he dead for sure but dude was not responsive when the ambulance came and got him, and the officer that was just out here left, the one that actually just murdered the kid in front of everybody.”

The Minneapolis police did not immediately respond to a message from The Post early on Tuesday about the recordings. Police declined to comment to the Star Tribune, citing the open investigation into Floyd’s death.

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This is interesting!