•   
  •   
  •   

US The New York Public Library's iconic lion statues are wearing lion-sized face masks

17:06  30 june  2020
17:06  30 june  2020 Source:   cnn.com

Facing a lion, this cameraman was afraid of his life!

 Facing a lion, this cameraman was afraid of his life! © Provided by Gentside Facing a lion, this cameraman was afraid of his life! When you venture out into the wild, it can be dangerous! Especially in regions where wild animals , predators , evolve. This poor cameraman will have understood it well as we can see on these images which are a little cold in the back, we let you admire.

Count on the New York Public Library's iconic lion sculptures to set an example of patience and fortitude.

a statue in front of a building: The twin lion sculptures that sit outside of the New York Public Library's Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street branch are now sporting masks to encourage New Yorkers to continue to follow safety measures. © Jonathan Blanc/New York Public Library The twin lion sculptures that sit outside of the New York Public Library's Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street branch are now sporting masks to encourage New Yorkers to continue to follow safety measures.

The marble statues that sit in front of the Steven A. Schwarzman Building in Manhattan's Bryant Park are now sporting their own lion-sized face masks to encourage New Yorkers to follow safety guidelines against coronavirus so their city can reopen in full.

Ex-Lion Tom Vaughn dies at 77

  Ex-Lion Tom Vaughn dies at 77 Tom Vaughn, a safety who spent his seven-year NFL career with the Lions, has died at the age of 77. Vaughn played his college football at Iowa State, where he was all-Big Eight as a fullback in 1963 and then as a defensive back in 1964. He also led the Big Eight in punt returns [more]Vaughn played his college football at Iowa State, where he was all-Big Eight as a fullback in 1963 and then as a defensive back in 1964. He also led the Big Eight in punt returns as both a junior and a senior, and he’s a member of Iowa State’s Hall of Fame.

The library mascots will wear their three-foot wide, two-foot tall masks to welcome back patrons when a few branches reopen next month. Anyone who enters one of its libraries is required to wear a mask, the New York Public Library said in a statement.

a statue of a man: Patience and Fortitude, the twin lion sculptures that guard the New York Public Library in Bryant Park, now wear lion-sized face masks to encourage New Yorkers to keep wearing their masks, too. © Jonathan Blanc/New York Public Library Patience and Fortitude, the twin lion sculptures that guard the New York Public Library in Bryant Park, now wear lion-sized face masks to encourage New Yorkers to keep wearing their masks, too.

The stoic lions, called Patience and Fortitude, have guarded the grand library for over 109 years. That means they stood watch throughout the 1918 influenza pandemic, too. 

New York employed many of the same safety tactics a century ago as it did when coronavirus crept in this year. A journal review of the city's public health response to that century-old pandemic reported that the city enforced what is now known as social distancing, bolstered its disease surveillance program and regulated how residents could use public spaces. Libraries were closed then, too, New York City College of Technology librarian Nora Almeida wrote in a pandemic-themed blog post for the college.

Patience and Fortitude have endured a similarly severe pandemic and guarded libraries that stayed empty for months, and the city made it through then. So maybe two marble lions aren't the worst role models for a New York public health campaign. 

Former Confederate capital Richmond removing contested statues .
Workers began removing Confederate statues in Richmond on Wednesday after the mayor of the US city, the former capital of the pro-slavery Civil War South, ordered them taken down. Mayor Levar Stoney was using his emergency powers to order the "the immediate removal of multiple monuments in the city, including Confederate statues," his office said in a statement. The mayor's office said removing the statues "will expedite the healing process for the city, a former capital of the Confederacy constantly grappling with that legacy.""Failing to remove the statues presents a severe, immediate and growing threat to public safety," it added.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 1
This is interesting!