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US De Blasio Says NYC Won’t ‘Take the Easy Way’ of Remote Schools

04:10  20 september  2020
04:10  20 september  2020 Source:   bloomberg.com

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(Bloomberg) -- New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he has confidence in his latest timeline for in-class learning and won’t “take the easy way” by instituting all-remote learning for the nation’s largest school district.

“Remote education is easier, it’s less helpful for our kids and our families, it sets them back and we’re not going to let that happen,” de Blasio said Friday in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” program.

a man standing in front of a computer: Mayor de Blasio And Chancellor Carranza Tour New Bridges Elementary School Ahead Of Schools Reopening © Photographer: Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg Mayor de Blasio And Chancellor Carranza Tour New Bridges Elementary School Ahead Of Schools Reopening

Bill de Blasio

De Blasio furloughs mayor's office staffers, and himself

  De Blasio furloughs mayor's office staffers, and himself De Blasio plans to work unpaid during his furlough, his office said. Other employees will not be expected to work while on furlough. The mayor has threatened to lay off 22,000 city employees, but has put that plan on hold amid hopes the state will give the city permission to borrow money and as he works on a deal with unions to make other labor cuts to save the $1 billion required to balance the budget.“We’ve already had to make some touch cuts that have affected this city, and the services we provide. We’re trying to do everything we can to stop those cuts from becoming worse,” he said.

Photographer: Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg

On Thursday, four days before all New York City schools were to reopen for in-person instruction, the mayor delayed classes for elementary schoolers until Sept. 29 and for middle- and high-school students until Oct. 1. The move, which followed an earlier delay that pushed the reopening to Sept. 21 from Sept. 10, frustrated parents and raised questions over whether the city would follow districts like Chicago and Los Angeles to start the year online.

The mayor reiterated his commitment to reopening in-person education, saying that most parents want their children back in the classrooms. Going virtual would “cheat our kids” and “exacerbate the disparities in our society,” he said.

“If we wanted to take the easy way we would have gone remote a long time ago,” he said.

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©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

New York City schools' remote opening is off to a bumpy, stressful start .
New York City schools opened Monday with in-person classes for some students but remote learning for most -- and the first few days have been a bumpy ride for all. © Michael Loccisano/Getty Images Melissa Wong, a teacher at Yung Wing School P.S. 124, swaps materials between her classroom and the stock room to prepare for the 2020/2121 school year on August 17, 2020 in New York City. The official start date of the Fall term is still to be determined, but students will be taught both in-person and remotely.

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