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US The University of Louisville's law school is offering a class on systematic racism titled 'Breonna Taylor's Louisville'

00:17  24 september  2020
00:17  24 september  2020 Source:   cnn.com

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(WAVE) - The University of Louisville ’ s Brandeis School of Law has created a new class centered around Breonna Taylor . The class does not specifically pertain to Taylor ’ s death but is more about the current and historical happenings that facilitate a culture in which police shootings happen.

Memorial to Breonna Taylor in Louisville , Kentucky [Laurin-Whitney Gottbrath/Al Jazeera]. One local university announced it would move to online classes on the day Cameron makes his announcement. Sam Marcosson, a professor at the University of Louisville School of Law , said

For months, the city of Louisville in Kentucky has been at the center of nationwide protests demanding justice for the police killing of Breonna Taylor.

a large brick building with grass in front of a house: Louis D. Brandeis School of Law on the campus of the University of Louisville. © Andy Lyons/Getty Images Louis D. Brandeis School of Law on the campus of the University of Louisville.

Now the University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law is offering a course to educate its students on the systemic inequalities that have led up to her death.

The 15-week course, titled "Breonna Taylor's Louisville: Race, Equity and Law," is being overseen by the law school's Dean Colin Crawford. The class, which began on August 13, touches on topics relating to race, inequity, and law such as as policing, housing, employment, finance, and healthcare.

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Breonna Taylor ' s death, along with the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man, in Minneapolis last Wanton endangerment in the first degree is a Class D felony that carries a maximum possible The city of Louisville last week agreed to pay million to Taylor ' s family to settle a wrongful death

Louisville police have declared a state of emergency ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron' s announcement about whether he will charge officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor (pictured). Officers Myles Cosgrove (left) and John Mattingly (right) who were

"The circumstances of Breonna Taylor's tragic death demand we collectively rethink how police and other institutions of the state engage with the public," Crawford told CNN. "My goal in this course is to give students material for them to think of themselves as agents of positive change using the law, not just looking at problems but finding ways to fix them."

Louisville Metro Police Department officers fatally shot Taylor on March 13 while executing a "no-knock" search warrant at her apartment. Gunfire broke out after her boyfriend fired a warning shot because he thought the plainclothes officers were intruders. The 26-year-old EMT, who was unarmed, was killed in the barrage of gunfire.

Crawford said he was inspired by the University of Maryland after they launched a course called "Freddie Gray's Baltimore," which was centered around the 25-year-old Black man who died after sustaining a neck injury while in police custody.

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Crowds in Louisville , where Taylor was shot at home in March, began marching and many cried moments after Taylor ’ s case has become a rallying cry against police brutality and racism across the US and the world, and Oprah Winfrey honors Breonna Taylor with September magazine cover.

Louisville appeared to be on lockdown early Wednesday awaiting an announcement from Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron on whether criminal charges will be brought Last Update 43 mins ago. Breonna Taylor decision expected today; Louisville locked down before possible civil unrest.

Crawford's class consists of discussions and speakers from the community, such as the executive director of Louisville's Metropolitan Housing Association and the CEO of a community development project in Louisville's West End, the historically Black part of town.

"When is there going to be another opportunity to take a class like this?" Erin Langley, a third-year law student at the university, told CNN affiliate WDRB. "Thinking about how each of us could have a role that means something going forward and when we graduate."

"These are things that are happening a few blocks away from campus," she added. "It's really right here."

Former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison was indicted by a grand jury Wednesday on three counts of wanton endangerment in the first degree for his actions on the night Taylor was killed by police.

"This ruling provides an opportunity for us here in Louisviille and as an entire society to reevaluate the circumstances under which the police interact with the public," Crawford said. "It's an opportunity to reexamine our policies and practices not just in the criminal law but in many areas."

The class meets once a week on Thursdays, and Crawford hopes it will become a permanent addition to the law school's course offerings.

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Just three days after a grand jury decided no charges for the killing of Breonna Taylor, evidence is leaking on social media and news sites.Video footage reviewed by The Courier Journal appearing to come from body cameras worn by Louisville Metro Police officers at Taylor's apartment March 13 shows potential violations of policies designed to maintain the integrity of the investigation.

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