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US 1 in 3 parents say they won't vaccinate their kids against flu this year, poll finds

17:02  29 september  2020
17:02  29 september  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

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About 32 percent, or 1 in 3 , parents said they will not get their children vaccinated against the flu . Results from a survey conducted by Michigan Medicine’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital reveals 1 in 3 parents doesn’ t plan to have their children get a flu vaccine this year , the Detroit Free Press reports.

About 96% of parents whose kids did get the flu shot said they intend to have their kids get it again. 1 in 3 parents do not plan on having their child get the flu vaccine , according to a new poll . C.S. Mott Children's Hospital conducted the national poll on children's health, and found that flu

Public health experts fear winter will bring the seasonal flu on top of the coronavirus pandemic, and many parents, at least one survey suggests, aren't going to vaccinate their children against it.

One in three parents say they won't get their children flu shots this year, according to a national health poll released Monday by Michigan Medicine's C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor.

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While two- thirds of parents surveyed said they intended to get their child a flu vaccine this year Some 14% of parents unlikely to vaccinate their child against the flu this year said it was because they were keeping their children away from health care settings due to concerns about COVID-19.

One in three Americans said they had no plans to vaccinate their kids against the flu , a new poll from the National Poll on Children's Health published on Monday. Nearly 96% of parents who had their children vaccinated last year said in the poll they will again this year .

"The pandemic doesn’t seem to be changing parents’ minds about the importance of the flu vaccine," the poll analysis concludes. "It could be a double whammy flu season this year as the nation already faces a viral deadly disease with nearly twin symptoms."

a man holding a sign: Anti-vaccine activists hold signs in front of the Massachusetts State House during a protest against Governor Charlie Baker's mandate that all Massachusetts school students enrolled in child care, pre-school, K-12, and post-secondary institutions must receive the flu vaccine this year on August 30, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts. © Scott Eisen, Getty Images Anti-vaccine activists hold signs in front of the Massachusetts State House during a protest against Governor Charlie Baker's mandate that all Massachusetts school students enrolled in child care, pre-school, K-12, and post-secondary institutions must receive the flu vaccine this year on August 30, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Mott Poll co-director Sarah Clark says this could "overwhelm the health care system, strain testing capacity and potentially reduce our ability to catch and treat both respiratory illnesses effectively."

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A new survey reportedly finds that plenty of parents are not planning to vaccinate their kids against the flu this winter. In a poll of 1 ,977 US parents

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The hospital's survey of nearly 2,000 parents of children ages 2-18 in August found many parents don’t see the flu vaccine as "more urgent or necessary."

Fourteen percent of parents surveyed say they will not seek the flu vaccine because they keep children away from health care sites, unwilling to risk coronavirus exposure.

Others may not get reminders to get the flu shot because child health providers have limited the number of patients seen for in-person visits.

Michael Grosso, chief medical officer and chair of pediatrics at Northwell Health’s Huntington Hospital in Long Island, New York, says this issue is part of a larger societal problem on vaccine hesitancy. Grosso is not affiliated with the Michigan poll.

“Some parents decline the shot because they don’t think the flu is serious, others because they doubt that the vaccine works, while still others are afraid of the side effects,” he says.

During 2018-2019, flu vaccination prevented an estimated 4.4 million illnesses and 3,500 influenza-associated deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency says the vaccine can reduce the risk of having to go to the doctor for treatment of the flu by 40-60%. Multiple studies have found no link between vaccines and autism.

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A new survey reportedly finds that plenty of parents are not planning to vaccinate their kids against the flu this winter. The survey didn' t investigate specific reasons why parents chose to vaccinate their kids or not. The survey reported, "Nearly four in 10 parents decided about flu vaccine for their

Find flu vaccines in your area. Everyone 6 months of age and older needs a flu vaccine . Children should be vaccinated every flu season for the best protection against flu . Vaccinating young children, their families, and other caregivers can also help protect them from getting sick.

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Michigan Medicine urges health providers to send reminder postcards and post website messages to emphasize the importance of children getting the flu vaccine during this pandemic year.

Among the 32% of parents who say their child is unlikely to get a flu vaccine, the most common reasons include concerns about side effects or beliefs that it isn’t necessary or effective.

The survey found the families least likely to get their children flu shots are those who didn’t do so last year, and less than a third of those parents say their child will probably get a flu vaccine this year.

In contrast, nearly all parents who say their child got a flu vaccine last year intend to have their child get vaccinated this year.

Influenza has led to 9 million to 45 million illnesses, including 140,000 to 810,000 hospitalizations and 12,000 to 61,000 deaths a year since 2010, the CDC estimates.

Children younger than 5, and especially those younger than 2, are at high risk.

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One third of US parents say they won ' t vaccinate their kids against flu this year . However, the survey also found that respondents said they have noticed their mail has recently taken longer to arrive. Forty-two percent reported receiving mail later in the day, while 37 percent said less mail is

The U.S. won ' t be vaccinating migrant families in holding centers ahead of this year 's flu season, despite calls from doctors to boost efforts to fight the infection that's killed at least three children at detention facilities in the They said the U.S. death rate in children from the flu is about 1 in 600,000.

“Parents need to know that even if an immunized child goes on to get the flu over the winter, the odds of a serious complication or the need for hospitalization are significantly less,” Grosso says.

This is especially important during the pandemic, he says. Studies have found that children get sicker when they’re co-infected by two or more respiratory viruses.

“Being immunized against influenza is far safer than the alternative,” he says.

Follow Frank Witsil and Adrianna Rodriguez on Twitter: @fwitsil @AdriannaUSAT.

Health and patient safety coverage at USA TODAY is made possible in part by a grant from the Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare. The Masimo Foundation does not provide editorial input.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: 1 in 3 parents say they won't vaccinate their kids against flu this year, poll finds

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