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US 'It's nothing but pain': The latest on the cases of violence against Black people that sparked America's racial reckoning

06:00  10 october  2020
06:00  10 october  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

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' It ' s nothing but pain ': The latest on the cases of violence against Black people that sparked America ' s racial reckoning . Ryans told The Tribune last month that he was confused by the officers' orders as one told him to get on the ground while another ordered him to come to him.

Across America and in countries around the world, people are taking to the streets to protest the death of George Floyd and acts of racially -motivated violence by police ' It ' s nothing but pain ': The latest on the cases of violence against Black people that sparked America ' s racial reckoning .

As the days tick down on a summer of racial reckoning in the U.S., the debate over police brutality and racial injustice shows no signs of cooling down, and it figures to play a significant role in the November elections.

The Aug. 23 police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and last week’s revelations about the death of Daniel Prude after being restrained by law enforcement officers in Rochester, New York, have further stoked the fires lit by the May 25 death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

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“ It ’ s hard to make up for decades, maybe centuries, of inequality of application of healthcare to people of color,” he said. Limited testing and slow public outreach resulted in the number of cases in the city jumping from just one “We know that black Americans are particularly vulnerable. This is a social

' It ' s nothing but pain ': The latest on the cases of violence against Black people that sparked America ' s racial reckoning . The black victims honoured in Naomi Osaka's US Open masks. BBC. Autistic teenager in Utah shot by police after mother calls for help.

They’re part of a series of high-profile incidents of violence against Black people – almost all by police, all but one fatal – that have prompted widespread protests and a national discussion about systemic racism.

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Other such instances include the fatal March 13 shooting of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, by officers who barged into her apartment with a no-knock warrant; the deadly June 12 shooting of Rayshard Brooks by an Atlanta policeman after an arrest went awry; and the Feb. 23 murder of Ahmaud Arbery, a jogger who was confronted in Glynn County, Georgia, by two white men who said they were protecting property in the area.

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It ’ s also about you. People of all races and ethnicities make the most consequential and the most mundane decisions based on the chokehold. The whole world knows that the United States faces a crisis in racial justice, but the focus on police and mass incarceration is too narrow.

Protesters in hundreds of cities across the U. S . are demanding justice for all Black lives and an end to police violence in predominantly peaceful

Romeo Ceasar holds a sign during a Black Lives Matter protester on Monday, July 20, 2020, in Portland, Oregon. © Noah Berger, AP Romeo Ceasar holds a sign during a Black Lives Matter protester on Monday, July 20, 2020, in Portland, Oregon.

All victims were Black, and none is known to have had a firearm at the time of the encounter, although Taylor’s boyfriend had a gun and fired at one of the officers. Blake, whose family said he’s paralyzed from the waist down, is the only one of the six to have survived.

Studies indicate Black people, who represent 13% of the U.S. population, are three times more likely to be killed by law enforcement than white people.

Here's the status of each case:

George Floyd

A video showing Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes – as Floyd gasps that he can’t breathe – struck a raw nerve in a nation used to hearing about such encounters but not seeing them in graphic detail. In body cam video released later, bystanders are heard pleading for Floyd, 46, to no avail.

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“We stand against racial discrimination. We condemn violence . Nine councilmembers announced their support and represent a supermajority on the twelve-person council, meaning the mayor, who earlier this weekend opposed disbanding the department, cannot override them.

It offers dear white people a 10-point plan that will help “white allies” to redeem themselves. Historically, the struggle against racism demanded solidarity from people of all races. Dear White People are not invited to work as equal participants in the struggle against racism.

All four officers who responded to the call about Floyd allegedly passing a fake $20 bill were fired and are facing various charges, with Chauvin’s count of second-degree murder the most serious one. The three other former officers, Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, have been charged with aiding and abetting murder.

In late August, Chauvin requested the charges against him be dismissed for lack of probable cause. The other three officers also filed motions to dismiss. Judge Peter Cahill has yet to rule on any of the motions, and he’ll hear oral arguments on behalf of Thao and Lane on Friday.

The trial is tentatively set for March 8.

Breonna Taylor

The emergency room technician, 26, and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were in bed when police burst in with a battering ram at 12:40 a.m. seeking a man she had dated whom they believed to be a drug dealer.

When Walker fired a shot that struck Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly in the thigh, he and officers Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove responded with more than 20 rounds, hitting Taylor five times. Walker said Taylor was alive for at least five minutes after being shot but did not get medical attention for more than 20 minutes, the Louisville Courier Journal of the USA TODAY Network reported.

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It was his arguments about black -on- black violence that seemed to get the most attention. "Fact: Black people kill more other blacks than Police do, and there are only protest and outrage when a University of Toledo criminologist Dr. Richard R. Johnson examined the latest crime data from the

Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a decentralized political and social movement advocating for non- violent civil disobedience in protest against incidents of police brutality and all racially motivated violence

a person holding a sign: A billboard sponsored by O, The Oprah Magazine, is on display with a photo of Breonna Taylor. Twenty-six billboards are going up across Louisville, demanding that the police officers involved in Taylor's death be arrested and charged. © Dylan T. Lovan, AP Images A billboard sponsored by O, The Oprah Magazine, is on display with a photo of Breonna Taylor. Twenty-six billboards are going up across Louisville, demanding that the police officers involved in Taylor's death be arrested and charged.

Hankison was dismissed from the force in late June for “wantonly and blindly’’ firing 10 shots inside the apartment, according to his termination letter, and Louisville has banned no-knock warrants through a measure known as “Breonna’s Law.’’

Those are the most meaningful actions so far to come out of the case, which is being investigated by the Kentucky attorney general and the FBI. No officers have been charged.

Ahmaud Arbery

No arrests were made after Arbery's death for more than 70 days, until video of his encounter with Gregory McMichael and his son Travis McMichael came to light.

The McMichaels, who later said they suspected Arbery of being a burglar, were armed while chasing him and trying to cut him off with their pickup truck. In the video, Arbery, 25, is seen jogging, then tussling with Travis McMichael over McMichael's shotgun as shots are heard and Arbery drops to the ground.

Father and son have been charged with murder and aggravated assault. Their neighbor, William “Roddie’’ Bryan, who recorded the video footage, also was charged with murder. No active law enforcement officer was involved in the incident, but Gregory McMichael is a former policeman.

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A George Bureau of Investigation agent testified in June that Bryan said that he heard Travis McMichael use a racial slur after shooting Arbery and that McMichael had used the term several times on social media and in text messages.

On June 24, the McMichaels and Bryan were indicted on murder and other charges by a grand jury. On Aug. 6, the McMichaels filed a motion requesting bond, which already had been denied to Bryan. They await trial.

a man is walking down the street: Kyna Sosa demonstrates Sunday, June 14, at Wendy's where protesters set fire to the Wendy's where Rayshard Brooks, a 27-year-old Black man, was shot and killed by Atlanta police. © Steve Schaefer, Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP Kyna Sosa demonstrates Sunday, June 14, at Wendy's where protesters set fire to the Wendy's where Rayshard Brooks, a 27-year-old Black man, was shot and killed by Atlanta police.

Rayshard Brooks

What seemed like a routine DUI stop turned deadly when Brooks, who had been cooperative and even congenial with Atlanta police officers, suddenly wrestled them to the ground and ran away with one of their Tasers after they tried to handcuff him in the parking lot of a Wendy’s restaurant. In a sequence captured on video, officer Garrett Rolfe is seen pursuing Brooks, 27, and shooting him twice.

Rolfe was fired the next day and later charged with 11 counts, including felony murder. Fellow officer Devin Brosnan was placed on administrative duty and charged with aggravated assault.

Brooks’ killing by a white officer, a little over two weeks after Floyd's death in Minneapolis, further inflamed racial tensions and increased demands for accountability. Though the incident was not as clear-cut as Floyd’s, law enforcement experts questioned whether Rolfe had to resort to deadly force.

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In early August, Rolfe sued Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and interim Police Chief Rodney Bryant, contending he was justified in his actions against Brooks. Rolfe is out on bond but is not allowed to leave the state.

Jacob Blake

Blake was shot seven times in the back by police officer Rusten Sheskey, who was responding to a call about a domestic disturbance. Cellphone video of the incident, which shows Blake walking toward the driver’s side door of his SUV and opening it before Sheskey grabs his shirt and shoots him, incited several nights of sometimes destructive demonstrations in Kenosha.

Authorities say that on the third night, 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse of Antioch, Illinois, gunned down two protesters and wounded another with an AR-15-style rifle. Rittenhouse has been charged as an adult with two counts of murder and one count of attempted murder.

Though Blake, 29, survived the shooting, he may never walk again. On a video from his hospital bed recorded Saturday, he described his ordeal saying: “Every 24 hours, it’s pain. It’s nothing but pain. It hurts to breathe. It hurts to sleep. It hurts to move from side to side. It hurts to eat.”

The reason for the shooting remains unclear. Investigators have said Blake acknowledged having a knife, although it hasn’t been established whether he had it at the time he was shot.

The U.S. Department of Justice has opened a civil rights investigation into the case. President Donald Trump visited Kenosha after the unrest and promoted his law-and-order message but did not talk with Blake’s family. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden visited with the family in person.

All three officers involved have been placed on administrative leave.

a group of people standing in front of a building: Protesters sit outside the Public Safety Building in Rochester, New York, wearing © Tracy Schuhmacher, Democrat and Chronicle via USA TODAY Network Protesters sit outside the Public Safety Building in Rochester, New York, wearing "spit hoods," the mesh fabric bag Rochester police used on Daniel Prude on March 23. Prude died of asphyxiation as police restrained him, according to the county medical examiner.

Daniel Prude

Prude, 41, died of asphyxiation a week after being forcefully restrained March 23 by Rochester police officers who found him naked on the streets in the early-morning hours. His family said he was having a mental health crisis.

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Bodycam video shows officers handcuffing Prude and later putting a “spit hood’’ on him even though he did not resist arrest or act violently. He was ranting, clearly disturbed, and PCP was found in his system. Prude’s death was ruled a homicide, with the PCP a factor in his death.

Prude’s case remained largely under the radar until Sept. 2, when his family released a compilation video of the incident, setting off several nights of protests that at times turned violent.

On Saturday, New York Attorney General Letitia James said she would empanel a grand jury to look into Prude’s death. On Monday, protesters demonstrated in front of the Rochester Public Safety Building wearing mesh hoods. On Tuesday, Rochester Police Chief La’Ron Singletary and other high-level members of the department resigned amid accusations of a cover-up.

Seven officers involved in the arrest have been suspended, but no charges have been filed.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: 'It's nothing but pain': The latest on the cases of violence against Black people that sparked America's racial reckoning

White woman in Central Park called 911 a second time on Black birdwatcher, prosecutors say .
Amy Cooper was arraigned Wednesday and faces a misdemeanor charge of falsely reporting an incident. Prosecutors say she called 911 twice.Cooper was arraigned Wednesday and is facing a misdemeanor charge of falsely reporting an incident to police after she called 911 in May and falsely said Christian Cooper, the birdwatcher who asked her to leash her dog in an area that requires that dogs be on leashes, was threatening and tried to attack her.

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