•   
  •   
  •   

US Hundreds gather for Women's March to protest Trump, Barrett nomination

04:05  18 october  2020
04:05  18 october  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation

  Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation Here’s what to expect and when she could officially be sworn in as the ninth justice on the Supreme Court. More: Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings conclude, paving way for confirmation days before election More: How we got here: The battle over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, recapped Committee vote Oct. 22 The Senate Judiciary Committee – the same 22-senator panel that spent the week questioning Barrett – will vote on Oct. 22 at 1 p.m. EDT on Barrett’s nomination.

Women and allies gathered in Washington, DC, and several other cities around the country to protest President Donald Trump ' s nomination of Amy Karen Ehrgott said she traveled from the Philadelphia area to attend the march to protest Barrett ' s nomination and the push to confirm her before the

Organizer promises presidency will begin and end with women marching while events include march at Goodbye civil rights: Amy Coney Barrett 's America is a terrifying place | Arwa Mahdawi. The latest in a series of rallies that began with a massive women ’ s march the day after Trump ’s January

Nearly four years after millions of people worldwide protested the first day of President Donald Trump's tenure, hundreds rallied in Washington, D.C., and marched to the National Mall on Saturday as thousands more joined virtual protests intended to galvanize voters ahead of Election Day.

More than 116,000 people with Women's March were expected to march or participate in other actions on Saturday, and more than 429 socially distanced and virtual sister marches were expected to take place in all 50 states, according to Women's March organizers.

"The first Women's March in 2017 was historic," Rachel Carmona, executive director of Women's March, said in a rally before the march Saturday afternoon in Washington, D.C. "Now four years later ... with 17 days to go (until the election), we're going to finish what we started."

Republicans on Senate panel to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination as Democrats boycott hearing

  Republicans on Senate panel to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination as Democrats boycott hearing The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court on Thursday, setting up a full Senate vote Monday.The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to meet at 9 a.m. EDT. Barrett is expected to be approved by Republicans who hold the majority on the panel, with Democrats saying they will boycott the day's proceedings. The full Senate is expected to take a final vote on Barrett's confirmation on Monday, eight days before Election Day.

President Trump nominated Judge Barrett to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. She is a woman of unparalleled achievement, towering intellect, sterling credentials and unyielding loyalty to the Constitution: Judge Amy Coney Barrett .”

The Women ' s March on Washington is expected to be largest inauguration-related protest in US history. More people are believed to be on the National Mall for the DC march than came for Trump 's inauguration. In total there are 600 sister marches throughout the country and across the world.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

The march in Washington was planned to culminate at the National Mall where organizers hoped to hold a virtual text banking telethon to send 5 million text messages to encourage people to vote. March organizers said they planned to honor the legacy of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and contest Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the court, which the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Oct. 22.

a group of people in front of a crowd: Demonstrators rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington. © Jose Luis Magana, AP Demonstrators rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.

"We are the hell and the high water. Donald Trump is leaving office, and there is no choice for him," Sonja Spoo, director of Reproductive Rights Campaigns at women's advocacy group UltraViolet, said at the rally. "Come Nov. 3, it will because of women – especially Black, brown and Indigenous women – stepping up and saying enough."

Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing

  Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing Merriam-Webster added the word "offensive" to its usage guidance of "preference" and "sexual preference" when referring to sexual orientation.During the hearing Tuesday, Barrett was asked whether she agrees with the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s criticism of the same-sex marriage ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges – the landmark case which legalized gay marriage in the United States and which advocates worry Barrett would not support if confirmed to the nation's highest court.

The Women ' s March organization is hosting this demonstration to protest President Donald Trump 's nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. "We're planning a massive, nationwide march on October 17 to send an unmistakable message of our fierce opposition to Trump and his

At major rallies in Washington, New York, LA and beyond, some said Trump ’ s ‘disastrous’ first year has left women angrier than ever.

'We are not resting': Women's March draws thousands, brings 'renewed energy' to start new decade

a group of people walking in front of a crowd: Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. © Daniel Slim, AFP via Getty Images Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC.

Women's March said all participants would be required to wear a mask and social distance and that hand sanitizer would be available. The organization requested that participants not travel to D.C. from states on the district's quarantine list.

Meanwhile, the Independent Women's Forum, a conservative American nonprofit, hosted its second-annual "March for All Women" counter-protest. This year's event, called the "I'm With Her!" rally, took place near the Supreme Court to support Barrett's nomination. The in-person rally would be limited to 100 people due to COVID-19 safety measures but would also be livestreamed, according to the forum.

Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday

  Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday NBC and ABC host dueling town halls with Trump and Biden, final day of hearings in Amy Coney Barrett's nomination and more things to know Thursday.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Women ' s March : Massive Protests Across U.S., World - Продолжительность: 2:15 Wall Street Journal 25 776 просмотров.

US President Donald Trump has nominated Amy Coney Barrett , a favourite of social conservatives, to be the new Supreme Court justice. Speaking by her side at the White House Rose Garden, Mr Trump described her as a " woman of unparalleled achievement".

"We believe Amy Coney Barrett bottom line should be treated with respect," Carrie Lukas, president of the Independent Women's Forum, said to the crowd, according to the livestream. "She is a great American, and you’ll find out what that means as she stands up for all of us."

The first Women's March on Jan. 21, 2017, was the largest single-day protest in U.S. history, according to the Crowd Counting Consortium. That day, the crowd estimator pegged nationwide participation in the 650-plus sister marches at 3.3 million to 5.3 million.

Subsequent marches took place in January of 2018, 2019 and 2020, and attendance was lower than in 2017.

Contributing: Jorge L. Ortiz, USA TODAY

a group of people posing for the camera: People rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington. © Jose Luis Magana, AP People rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Hundreds gather for Women's March to protest Trump, Barrett nomination

Senate Democrats will boycott Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation hearing vote as GOP vows to move forward .
Senate Democrats say they will boycott a committee hearing Thursday where Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination is set to move forward.The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote tomorrow afternoon on Barrett's confirmation to the high court, a vote that was expected to pass along party lines and send her nomination to the full Senate for a Monday vote — just eight days before Election Day.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 4
This is interesting!