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US 1st 'murder hornet' nest discovered in US: Officials

09:05  24 october  2020
09:05  24 october  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

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(AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine, a city north of

(AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine, a city north of

Washington state entomologists discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the United States this week, officials said.

a bird sitting on a branch: Entomologists discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S. on a property in Blaine,Wash., Oct. 22, 2020. © Washington State Department of Agriculture Entomologists discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S. on a property in Blaine,Wash., Oct. 22, 2020.

The "murder hornets" were first spotted in the state late last year, and entomologists have since been on alert for the massive insects, which can devastate honey bee populations.

MORE: 'Murder Hornets,' with sting that can kill, land in US

After weeks of trapping and searching, Washington State Department of Agriculture entomologists located what they said is the first nest of its kind in the U.S., in Blaine, north of Seattle near the Canadian border.

Authorities discover first 'murder hornet' nest in U.S.

  Authorities discover first 'murder hornet' nest in U.S. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine, a city north of Seattle near the Canadian border. Bad weather delayed plans to destroy the nest Friday. The world’s largest hornet at 2 inches long, the invasive insects can decimate entire hives of honeybees and deliver painful stings to people. Farmers in the northwestern U.S. depend on those honeybees to pollinate many crops, including raspberries and blueberries.

(AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine, a city north of

(AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine

The nest was found after four live hornets were caught this week in traps the agriculture department set up in the area. Entomologists were able to attach radio trackers to three of the hornets, and one of them led them to the nest -- located in the cavity of a tree on private property -- Wednesday afternoon, officials said. The team observed dozens of hornets entering and leaving the tree.

The property owner gave the agency permission to eradicate the nest and, if necessary, remove the tree, officials said. The agency was unable to eliminate the nest Friday due to bad weather and plans to try again Saturday, officials said.

Entomologists said they expect to extract anywhere from 100 to 200 hornets from the tree based on findings from thermal cameras. The plan is to extract the insects using a vacuum, the agency's managing entomologist, Sven Spichiger, said during a press briefing Friday afternoon.

Washington state discovers first 'murder hornet' nest in U.S.

  Washington state discovers first 'murder hornet' nest in U.S. The giant insects were first detected in the U.S. in December 2019.After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine, a city north of Seattle near the Canadian border. Bad weather delayed plans to destroy the nest Friday.

(AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine

Giant murder hornets are making a return. Entomologists from the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) located the first -ever Asian First discovered in Washington state in December 2019, Asian giant hornets are an invasive species not native to the US . They are the world's largest

"We will be jamming foam into the entrance and Saran-wrapping it so that we can control the release of hornets from the nest," Spichiger said. "This will allow us to do the vacuum extraction in a little bit more controlled environment."

The hornets typically nest in the ground, so the discovery of the nest about 8 feet up in the tree cavity was unexpected, Spichiger said. He did note that there is a possibility that this is not the real nest and that the hornets have "robbed a honeybee nest." But "that is unlikely," he added. Entomologists were looking to confirm it was the nest on Friday.

MORE: How concerned should the US be about 'murder hornets'?

The first confirmed detection of an Asian giant hornet in the U.S. was in Whatcom County, Washington, in December, with two verified reports of the insect near Blaine. Two were also discovered in British Columbia, Canada, last fall.

Since then, 20 hornets have been caught in Whatcom County, according to the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

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SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to Washington state officials say they were again unsuccessful at live-tracking an Asian giant hornet while trying to find and destroy a nest of the so-called murder hornets .

(AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in Blaine, a city north of

Spichiger said there is a "very good possibility" there is more than just this one nest in the area, given the evidence they have so far. The agency plans to keep the traps up through the end of November. "That should tell us a little more," he added.

a bird sitting on a branch: A radio tracking device is attached to a hornet. Entomologists discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S. on a property in Washington on Oct. 22. © Washington State Department of Agriculture A radio tracking device is attached to a hornet. Entomologists discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S. on a property in Washington on Oct. 22.

Hundreds of traps have been set throughout Washington by state agriculture department staff, scientists and others, in an attempt to eliminate the pest. The world's largest hornet, at 2 inches, the apex predator can kill an entire honey bee hive in just hours. With bee populations already in decline in the U.S., in what's known as "colony collapse disorder," the hornets pose another threat to the ecosystem if they become established over several years.

"Unfortunately, managed honeybees we use here have no natural defense against them," Spichiger said. "Stopping this cold is very crucial."

"You should be cautiously optimistic that we're still only talking about Whatcom County at this point," he later said.

For humans, the hornet's sting is more painful than that of a typical bee or wasp, and people are advised to use caution near the insects and not attempt to remove or eradicate nests themselves.

Native to Asian countries including China and Japan, it's not known how the hornets arrived in the Pacific Northwest, though through international cargo is one theory.

Asian giant 'murder hornet' queens captured in Washington .
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This is interesting!