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US New York City to reopen schools for 200,000 students Dec. 7, mayor says

18:20  30 november  2020
18:20  30 november  2020 Source:   politico.com

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NEW YORK — Nearly 200 , 000 pre-kindergarten, elementary school and special-needs students The mayor laid out the reopening plan during a press conference Sunday, less than two weeks The official, who is involved in the city ’s pandemic response, said the decision to close schools was

New York City schools are set to reopen in stages starting Dec . 7 , Mayor de Blasio said Sunday. De Blasio said his reopening plan covers about 190, 000 students for now. The window for students to opt for in-person learning ended earlier this month, with the rest of the student population limited to

NEW YORK — Nearly 200,000 pre-kindergarten, elementary school and special-needs students will begin returning to in-person learning next week, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Sunday. The move follows outrage from parents and people in his own administration over his decision to shut public schools earlier this month.

a woman standing on a sidewalk: West Brooklyn Community High School students © Kathy Willens/AP Photo West Brooklyn Community High School students

Middle and high school students will continue remote education, since they are more likely to spread Covid-19 and can better acclimate to virtual classes, de Blasio said.

The younger students will be in school five days a week, and they and school staff will be tested for the virus weekly.

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New York City 's public elementary schools will return to partial in-person learning Dec . 7 -- while middle- and high- schools students will have to DeBlasio's plan only makes sense if he's planning to reopen middle/high schools quickly after Dec 7 . If not, he's just abandoned without explanation a

New York City public schools will begin reopening on Dec . 7 despite levels of Covid-19 that re -shuttered schools earlier this month, Mayor Bill New York City 's public schools begin to reopen Monday, December 7 , Mayor de Blasio said Sunday. This just 10 days after de Blasio announced

“It’s a new approach because we have so much proof now of how safe schools can be, and this has come from real life experience of the biggest school system in America,” de Blasio said when asked about his decision to change the threshold for school closures once again. “We feel confident that we can keep schools safe.”

The mayor laid out the reopening plan during a press conference Sunday, less than two weeks after he shut schools as part of a deal he had struck with the teacher’s union to close the buildings when the citywide transmission rate hit a weekly average of 3 percent. Sunday’s seven-day, citywide positivity rate was 3.9 percent.

The city will no longer use the 3 percent cutoff to determine school closures instead relying on specific Covid-19 cases at each school.

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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio says the city 's schools will begin a phased reopening on Dec . And we became one of the few major cities in America to reopen ourschools. Fact by far course the biggest school Students will not be able to attend school unless they have a consent form on record period.

The mayor and schools chancellor said Sunday they believe children will be safe in schools and could do in-person learning up to five times a week. dw.com. NYC schools to reopen in phases beginning Dec . 7 : mayor . WPIX New York City , NY . old COVID-19 survivor still facing long road to

“I feel for all our parents who are experiencing so many challenges right now — how important it is to have their younger kids in school,” de Blasio said. “We now believe we know what we didn’t know back in the summer — we know what works through actual experience.”

Families will have to give consent for students to be tested once a week. Those who don't will not be allowed to attend in-person classes, de Blasio said. Only students who opted for in-person learning earlier this year will be able to attend, but they will now have classroom instruction for five days a week, rather than the blended model the city used before.

United Federation of Teachers president Michael Mulgrew, who has held significant sway over City Hall’s actions during the course of the pandemic, said he supported the policy as long as "stringent testing is in place."

"This strategy — properly implemented — will allow us to offer safe in-person instruction to the maximum number of students until we beat the pandemic," Mulgrew said in a statement.

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Mayor Bill de Blasio said Sunday that New York City schools will begin a phased reopening on Dec . 7 , abandoning the 3% positive test rate threshold for Covid-19 he set earlier for Pre-kindergarten through elementary schools to reopen first. City moves to return to 5-day a week in-person instruction.

The mayor and schools chancellor said Sunday they believe children will be safe in schools and could do in-person learning up to five times a week. CBS New York .

De Blasio’s decision to shut schools two weeks ago sparked anger within City Hall, with most public health and high-ranking administration officials advising against it, according to four people involved in the talks. They felt he was gratuitously kowtowing to Mulgrew, who ended up admonishing the system that affords mayors control over public schools just days after he signed off on the closure plan.

“Closing schools was deeply frustrating after all the work that went into opening them and how much a success it had been,” said one administration official, who would only speak on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

The official, who is involved in the city’s pandemic response, said the decision to close schools was “based on a conservative approach that was out-dated after all the data [was] collected. The fact that we couldn’t pivot sooner was disappointing, but now we’re in the right place.”

The news will likely be a relief to parents of younger students who have criticized the mayor's decision to close schools while restaurants, bars and gyms have remained open in a limited capacity. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has ultimate authority over those businesses and has said they will have to face renewed restrictions.

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Cuomo told reporters Sunday he believes the plan is “the right decision,” given the facts and information public health officials now have about Covid-19 infection rates among younger school children.

“Keeping schools open, where safe, is best,” he said during an afternoon conference call. “And I think New York City opening schools is the right direction and the right decision.”

How to manage the city’s network of public schools has arguably been the biggest challenge de Blasio has faced during the pandemic. He agonized over whether to shut them during the virus’s surge in March, initially holding off — despite advice from the city’s health department — out of concern for delayed academic progress and working parents who cannot afford private child care. Days later he closed schools for the remainder of the academic year and, after several more delays, announced a blend of in-person and remote learning.

About half of the city’s 1.1 million students had opted to attend some in-person classes, though just about 283,000 showed up through October, according to city data.

Asked about his original call to shutter schools, the mayor replied, “I felt bad about it for sure and I didn’t want to do it, but I felt we had to keep the commitment we made.”

The latest blueprint, he added, “is what’s going to take us through until we have a vaccine.”

Shannon Young contributed to this report.

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