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US Lawyers prepare to defend travelers to US at airports

01:01  28 june  2017
01:01  28 june  2017 Source:   ap.org

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Travelers wait in line near an Emirates ticket counter at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport , Monday, June 26, 2017, in Seattle. There’s also an app that routes information about troubled travelers to lawyers monitoring the airports . On Monday, the Supreme Court said it will hold a full

“It occurred to us that there were going to be people who were traveling who would land and have their status affected while in midair,” said Betsy Fisher, the Daniel Bodah, one of hundreds of lawyers who volunteered their time at airports across the United States this weekend after an executive order on

Travelers wait in line near an Emirates ticket counter at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Monday, June 26, 2017, in Seattle. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that President Donald Trump's travel ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced if those visitors lack a © The Associated Press Travelers wait in line near an Emirates ticket counter at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Monday, June 26, 2017, in Seattle. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that President Donald Trump's travel ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced if those visitors lack a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," and that justices will hear full arguments in October 2017. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

NEW YORK — When the Trump administration's travel ban takes partial effect this week, immigrant-rights lawyers plan to head to the nation's major airports to make sure eligible foreigners are able to get into the country.

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Foreign nationals attempting to come to the United States , either temporarily or permanently, have few rights during the application and screening process. You cannot have a lawyer represent you when you attempt to enter the U . S ., nor are you allowed to call one if problems occur during your interrogation.

An army of corporate lawyers has joined the battle against President Donald Trump’s travel ban on citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries, as an effort to advise travellers detained at US airports shifts to legal action that could stretch on for years.

But attorneys say few people are likely to be affected, and they don't expect a repeat of the mass confusion that resulted earlier this year when President Donald Trump rolled out his original ban on travel from a group of mostly Muslim countries.

"Our hope is unlike the chaos that previously occurred, there will be a much smoother and much less traumatic result," said Caitlin Bellis, an attorney at Public Counsel in Los Angeles.

The Department of Homeland Security hasn't offered any guidance on how this week's Supreme Court ruling on the ban will be interpreted, so attorneys are preparing for anything and will monitor airports from Los Angeles to New York in case they are needed to assist foreigners held for questioning or denied entry by customs and border agents.

The 5-month odyssey of Trump's travel ban

  The 5-month odyssey of Trump's travel ban WASHINGTON — President Trump's travel ban has been trampled in the federal courts for the past five months. Here's a brief timeline: Jan. 27: Trump issues an executive order entitled "Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States." It suspends travel from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen for 90 days, blocks refugees for 120 days, and suspends travel from Syria indefinitely. Jan. 28: Chaos reigns at U.S. airports as Department of Homeland Security agents block travelers from entering the country, leading to protests and legal action. Jan. 28-29: Federal judges in New York and Massachusetts issue temporary restraining orders that affect certain travelers but not the entire travel ban. Jan. 30: Trump fires acting Attorney General Sally Yates for refusing to defend the travel ban. Feb. 3: Federal District Court Judge James Robart in Seattle issues a nationwide restraining order that blocks the travel ban from being implemented. Feb. 9: U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, based in San Francisco, refuses to reinstate the ban, ruling that it violates due process rights without a sufficient national security justification. Feb. 13: Federal District Court Judge Leonie Brinkema in Virginia issues a preliminary injunction against the ban, ruling that the state would suffer irreparable harm. Feb. 16: Trump says he will issue a new travel ban rather than continue to defend the first one.

Lawyers who sued the government to block the White House order said the judge’s decision could affect an estimated 100 to 200 people who were Peaceful demonstrations began Saturday afternoon at Kennedy International Airport in Queens, where nearly a dozen travelers had been detained, an

Drab airport screening areas and waiting rooms were transformed into chaotic scenes on Sunday, with lawyers saying that border agents had put pressure on detainees and created an information blackout that left many struggling to discern how President Trump’s immigration order was being applied.

Advocates have a hotline and email addresses where relatives can seek help if family members get stuck. There's also an app that routes information about troubled travelers to lawyers monitoring the airports.

On Monday, the Supreme Court said it will hold a full hearing on the ban in October, but until then, the Trump administration can bar travelers from Syria, Sudan, Iran, Yemen, Libya and Somalia if they lack a "credible claim of a bona fide relationship" with someone or some institution in the U.S.

Immigration lawyers said they believe that visas already issued to travelers from the six countries will probably still be considered valid for entry into the U.S. But for those who are seeking a visa from here on in, there are many unknowns.

Exactly what constitutes a "bona fide relationship" could become a matter of dispute, though the justices suggested that a close family member such as a spouse or a mother-in-law, a job in the U.S., a speaking invitation or enrollment at a university could qualify. Others, such as would-be tourists or some scholars, could find themselves shut out.

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  Homeland Security Announces New Airline Measures The new guidelines include potentially lifting the ban on laptops and large electronics if airports are compliant.Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly announced on Wednesday that all inbound commercial flights to the United States will now be subject to enhanced security measures.

US travel ban - a brief guide. The executive order signed by Donald Trump suspends the entire US An estimated 400 lawyers have signed up to represent detainees, and dozens flocked to airports Immigrant advocacy groups said the protests on Saturday that were staged at US airports were

However, travellers entering the United States in certain business-related categories are required to Random screenings of exempt Canadians have occurred at border crossings and airports . Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers ' diarrhea from consuming

The partial ban is expected to take effect Thursday. When Trump's earlier, broader ban was announced in January, travelers found themselves detained for hours and in some cases sent back, prompting large demonstrations outside airports and a flurry of lawsuits.

Trina Realmuto, litigation director for the National Lawyers Guild's national immigration project, said the government's guidance on how it plans to implement the order is key.

Homeland Security said the order will be carried out "professionally, with clear and sufficient public notice."

Nicky Smith, executive director of the International Rescue Committee's Seattle office, said she worries about refugee children traveling to the U.S. for medical care.

"If kids can't get into the country, some of the cases that we've had over the past few months, if they had been delayed by a week, they wouldn't have made it," she said.

At Dulles Airport outside Washington, lawyers are planning to be there to assist travelers as necessary and also show customs and border agents they are watching, said Sirine Shebaya, a board member with the Dulles Justice Coalition.

She said it's too early to know whether lawyers will be needed there long term.

"One of the best ways to know that is just to be there," she said.

___

Taxin reported from Santa Ana, California. Associated Press writers Deepti Hajela in New York and Matthew Barakat in McLean, Virginia, contributed to this report.

Emirates, Turkish Airlines try to join Etihad off laptop ban .
<p>At Abu Dhabi International Airport, travelers bound for the United States on Tuesday enjoyed something many others flying out of the Middle East can't — walking onto an airplane with their laptop.</p>But what has changed in Abu Dhabi remains unclear as the laptop ban still affects nine other regional airports, including the world's busiest for international travel in nearby Dubai.

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