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US Trump administration to ask states to speed up vaccinations instead of holding back second doses

16:25  12 january  2021
16:25  12 january  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

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The Trump administration is set to deliver new guidelines to get coronavirus vaccinations moving much faster, reports. New federal guidelines will recommend opening up the process to everyone older than 65 and will also aim to move doses out the door rather than holding some back .

Trump administration to expand Covid vaccination guidelines to everyone 65 and older. The Trump administration will issue new guidelines Tuesday that expand coronavirus vaccine eligibility "The states are being told immediately they need to expand to 65-plus as well as those under 65 with

The U.S. government is asking states to speed up COVID-19 vaccinations to people over the age of 65 and others at risk instead of holding back vaccines for a second dose.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said that “the administration in the states has been too narrowly focused.”

"We now believe that our manufacturing is predictable enough that we can ensure second doses are available for people from ongoing production," Azar told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Tuesday. "So everything is now available to our states and our health care providers.”

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WASHINGTON—The Trump administration is asking states to speed up approval for vaccine distribution sites by Nov. 1, the latest sign the federal government is eager to get a vaccine out before the end of the year. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield urged state

Last week, Whitmer urged the Trump administration to release millions of vaccine doses she said had been ' held back .' 'Last week, I joined the governors of eight states to ask the Trump Administration to immediately release millions of doses of COVID-19 vaccines that it is currently

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The Trump administration is expected to deliver new guidelines Tuesday that aim to speed things up and get more people vaccinated, moving the nation closer to widespread immunity. Federal officials have been holding back enough vaccine doses to guarantee booster shots to everyone who got the first dose.

Donald Trump holding a sign: President Donald Trump speaks during an © Evan Vucci, AP President Donald Trump speaks during an "Operation Warp Speed Vaccine Summit" on the White House complex, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020, in Washington, D.C.

After a glow of hope when the first vaccines were approved last month, the nation's inoculation campaign has gotten off to a slow start.

So far, the vaccine rollout has been primarily to health care workers and nursing home residents. Of 25.4 million doses distributed, about 8.9 million have been administered as of Monday, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Every vaccine administered will be reported to the state immunization registry, so the clinics can check in the database whether the patients have received their shots. They will also be reported to the CDC, according to Claire Hannan of the Association of Immunization Managers, another nonprofit

Barnett is being held in the Washington County Detention Center in Fayetteville, Ark., awaiting his initial appearance, according to NBC News.A New York Times reporter on Wednesday shared a video of Biden plans to release available COVID-19 vaccines instead of holding back for second doses .

Azar said it was now time to move “to the next phase on the vaccine program” and expand the pool of those eligible to get the first dose.

That also means expanding the number of places where people can be vaccinated by adding community health centers and additional drug stores.

“We’ve already distributed more vaccine than we have health care workers and people in nursing homes,” Azar said. “We’ve got to get to more channels of administration. We’ve got to get it to pharmacies, get it to community health centers.”

He said the federal government “will deploy teams to support states doing mass vaccination efforts if they wish to do so.”

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President-elect Biden wants to release all vaccine doses to speed up the vaccination program – but the risk is that vaccine The FDA says there is no data that demonstrates vaccine efficacy if the second dose is delayed.I’m interested in this debate because I coordinate an international registry of

Trump has promised to sign the bill quickly, as widespread layoffs hit workers and hospitals ask for more resources to fight the coronavirus. House leaders rushed lawmakers back to Washington to block an effort by Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., to ask for a recorded vote, which could have delayed

The American Hospital Association estimates the nation would need to vaccinate 1.8 million people a day, every day, from Jan. 1 to May 31, to reach the goal of having widespread immunity by the summer. That's also called “herd immunity” and would involve vaccinating at least 75% of the population.

The news comes after the incoming Biden administration announced a plan Friday to prioritize the first dose and release all the available COVID-19 vaccines. The team said that it didn't make sense to hold back vaccine at a time when more Americans are dying than at any point in the pandemic.

As of Tuesday, the U.S. reported more than 22 million cases and 375,000 deaths related to COVID-19, according to Johns Hopkins data.

“The president-elect believes we must accelerate distribution of the vaccine while continuing to ensure the Americans who need it most get it as soon as possible," spokesman T.J. Ducklo said in a statement sent to USA TODAY on Friday. Biden “supports releasing available doses immediately, and believes the government should stop holding back vaccine supply so we can get more shots in Americans’ arms now.”

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Biden is expected to give a speech Thursday outlining his plan to speed vaccines to more people in the first part of his administration.

Both vaccines authorized for use were studied in a two-dose regimen, with the Pfizer-BioNTech doses given 21 days apart and Moderna's 28 days apart.

Contributing: Karen Weintraub, USA TODAY; Associated Press. Follow Adrianna Rodriguez on Twitter: @AdriannaUSAT.

Health and patient safety coverage at USA TODAY is made possible in part by a grant from the Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare. The Masimo Foundation does not provide editorial input.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Trump administration to ask states to speed up vaccinations instead of holding back second doses

No stockpile? Governors hit Washington as vaccine chokepoints pile up .
Several governors on Friday accused HHS Secretary Alex Azar of deceiving them about how many doses they could expect in the near future. Azar said Tuesday that the Trump administration was planning to release a strategic reserve of doses that it had been holding back for booster shots, but governors said they have since learned that there is no reserve because it was already released before this week.“I am demanding answers from the Trump Administration,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, said Friday on Twitter.

usr: 3
This is interesting!