•   
  •   
  •   

US COVID funeral assistance: What you need to know about FEMA program and how you can apply

20:25  10 april  2021
20:25  10 april  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Complete List Of COVID-19 Cases In UFC

  Complete List Of COVID-19 Cases In UFC Dive in to see a complete and updated list of all the fighters, coaches and cornermen who have tested positive for COVID-19 since the pandemic began earlier this year.A few months into the pandemic, Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) President, Dana White, defied the odds and kept his promise of being the first major sports organization to get the ball rolling, staging UFC 249 on May 9, 2020, in Jacksonville, Florida. It didn’t take long for COVID-19 to show its ugly head, though, as Ronaldo Souza and a few of his cornermen tested positive for the virus, prompting his removal from the event.

There have been more than 560,000 COVID-19 related deaths in the United States.

To help those left behind, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is paying a maximum of $9,000 per funeral and a maximum of $35,500 per application.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has caused immense grief for so many people," acting FEMA Administrator Bob Fenton said in a release announcing the federal program. "Although we cannot change what has happened, we affirm our commitment to help with funeral and burial expenses that many families did not anticipate."

a man doing a trick with a sunset in the background: Volunteers with the COVID Memorial Project install 20,000 American flags on the National Mall as the United States crosses the 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic September 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. The flags are displayed on the grounds of the Washington Monument facing the White House. © Win McNamee, Getty Images Volunteers with the COVID Memorial Project install 20,000 American flags on the National Mall as the United States crosses the 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic September 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. The flags are displayed on the grounds of the Washington Monument facing the White House.

In the lead-up to the 2020 election, all eyes are on Iowa. Get updates of all things Iowa politics delivered to your inbox.

OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court sides with Georgia over Florida in long-fought water war | FEMA unveils new flood insurance calculation it says will be more equitable | Energy Dept. pushes to reverse Trump-era rule on efficiency standards

  OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court sides with Georgia over Florida in long-fought water war | FEMA unveils new flood insurance calculation it says will be more equitable | Energy Dept. pushes to reverse Trump-era rule on efficiency standards HAPPY THURSDAY!!! Welcome to Overnight Energy, your source for the day's energy and environment news.Please send tips and comments to Rachel Frazin at rfrazin@thehill.com. Follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin. Reach Zack Budryk at zbudryk@thehill.com or follow him on Twitter: @BudrykZack. Signup for our newsletter and others HERE. Today we're looking at the Supreme Court siding with Georgia in its water dispute with Florida, changes to the National Flood Insurance Program and an Energy Department move toward making it easier to set energy efficiency standards.

The program launches Monday, April 12. The following information — along with other resources — can be on the FEMA website for the program.

COVID-19: Moms who breastfeed face challenges as offices reopen

Who is eligible?

To be eligible for funeral assistance, you must meet these conditions, according to FEMA:

  • The death must have occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.
  • The death certificate must indicate the death was attributed to COVID-19.
  • The applicant must be a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national, or qualified alien who incurred funeral expenses after January 20, 2020.
  • There is no requirement for the deceased person to have been a U.S. citizen, non-citizen national or qualified alien.

How to apply for funeral reimbursement

FEMA encourages people who have had COVID-19 funeral expenses to keep and gather funeral documentation. According to FEMA, the following types of information should include:

'I am a better mom': After quitting their jobs during the pandemic to care for family, here's how it changed these women

  'I am a better mom': After quitting their jobs during the pandemic to care for family, here's how it changed these women When COVID-19 hit, some moms quit their jobs to provide child care. From Girl Scout meetings, to cooking, to night school, here's how they've changed.Working mothers have long faced "the second shift" – coming home to unpaid work that includes household labor and child care – and the pandemic has heightened the caregiver burden with children learning at home instead of returning to school.

  • An official death certificate that attributes the death directly or indirectly to COVID-19 and shows that the death occurred in the United States, including the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.
  • Funeral expenses documents that include the applicant’s name, the deceased person’s name, the amount of funeral expenses, and the dates the funeral expenses happened.
  • Proof of funds received from other sources specifically for use toward funeral costs. FEMA is not able to duplicate benefits received from burial or funeral insurance, financial assistance received from voluntary agencies, government agencies, or other sources.

The application process opens Monday, April 12.

For assistance, you can call FEMA at 844-684-6333 or 800-462-7585 (TTY). Assistance is available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. CT.

How are funds received?

Those eligible for funeral assistance will receive a check by mail, or funds by direct deposit, depending on which option you choose when you apply for assistance, according to FEMA.

Food banks, passing on passports, governors’ shots: News from around our 50 states

  Food banks, passing on passports, governors’ shots: News from around our 50 states How the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting every stateStart the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

FEMA warns about scams

According to FEMA, the funeral assistance program is working to reduce the chance of fraud. FEMA says it will not contact anyone until they have called FEMA or have applied for assistance. If you receive an unsolicited calls or emails, FEMA says you should not disclose information such as the name, birth date or Social Security number of any deceased family member.

If you doubt a FEMA representative is legitimate, FEMA says you should hang up and report it to its helpline at 800-621-3362 or the National Center for Fraud Hotline at 866-720-5721. Complaints also may be made by contacting local law enforcement agencies, FEMA says.

If you have questions about the program, FEMA has a FAQ page with more information.

This article originally appeared on Des Moines Register: COVID funeral assistance: What you need to know about FEMA program and how you can apply

FEMA: Don't drive the Gullah-Geechee from their land .
Disaster assistance will not solve all of the Gullah-Geechee’s problems, but in the wake of a hurricane or storm surge it is an essential lifeline that can keep people in their homes and on their land. Fortunately, there are remedies at hand. For example, FEMA could create a presumption that Gullah-Geechee and similarly-situated individuals who can prove occupancy of heirs' property are eligible for FEMA assistance.

usr: 5
This is interesting!