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US The charge: Manslaughter

01:05  15 april  2021
01:05  15 april  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Hundreds protest at Brooklyn Center Police Department for 4th night after shooting

  Hundreds protest at Brooklyn Center Police Department for 4th night after shooting Hundreds of people gathered outside the Brooklyn Center Police Department on Wednesday as protests over the killing of Daunte Wright continued for a fourth night. "The crowd tonight continued to present some public safety challenges as they pulled on the fence, shot pyrotechnics, lobbed bricks and bottles over the fence," Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington said at a press conference just after midnight. "I think tonight we were around 500 people there, yelling and chanting late into the evening.

Kim Potter, the police officer who shot and killed Daunte Wright, was arrested on manslaughter charges. The biggest scammer of all time, Bernie Madoff, died in prison. And the Earth, like all of us, contains multitudes. And we just found a new layer.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Naisha Wright (R), Daunte Wright's aunt, grieves during a press conference at the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis, Minn. on April 13, 2021. © KEREM YUCEL, AFP via Getty Images Naisha Wright (R), Daunte Wright's aunt, grieves during a press conference at the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis, Minn. on April 13, 2021.

???? It's Laura! I've got your Wednesday news.

But first, an exceedingly long rabbit named Darius is missing. ???? Y'all, the authorities in England don't think this rabbit just hopped away from home either. They suspect Darius, a 4-foot, 3-inch-long Continental Giant rabbit, was stolen. ????  Somebunny must know where he is.

What Is Second-Degree Manslaughter? Kim Potter's Charge Over Daunte Wright Shooting Explained

  What Is Second-Degree Manslaughter? Kim Potter's Charge Over Daunte Wright Shooting Explained Former Officer Potter has been taken to jail where she will await her first court appearance in the shooting of Daunte Wright.According to the U.S. Department of Justice, manslaughter is defined as "the unlawful killing of a human being without malice" under Section 1112 of Title 18.

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Officer who shot Daunte Wright arrested

The Minnesota police officer who shot Daunte Wright could face up to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine if she is convicted on charges of second-degree manslaughter. Kim Potter, a 26-year-veteran of the Brooklyn Center Police Department, was arrested Wednesday and is being held without bail in the Hennepin County jail. Former police chief Tim Gannon, who resigned Tuesday, said he believed Potter mistakenly reached for her firearm instead of her Taser when she shot Wright, 20, a Black man, who fled after struggling with police during a traffic stop Sunday. Potter, who is white, also resigned Tuesday. Wright's family called for Potter to be held accountable and said they could not accept the police's account of the incident as "an accident."

Minnesota protests continue for a sixth night as Wright's loved ones mourn for his son

  Minnesota protests continue for a sixth night as Wright's loved ones mourn for his son As Daunte Wright's loved ones reflected on a son who will grow up without a father, a peaceful march and protest calling for justice in his death devolved into unrest and, authorities said, at least 100 people were arrested on Friday night. © Stephen Maturen/Getty Images BROOKLYN CENTER, MN - APRIL 16: A demonstrator raises his fist during a protest outside the Brooklyn Center police station on April 16, 2021 in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota.

  • "He did not deserve this": Family remembers Daunte Wright as an adoring dad who enjoyed playing sports and celebrating the Fourth of July.
a close up of a man who is smiling and looking at the camera: Kim Potter resigned from the Brooklyn Center Police Department in Minnesota. © Bruce Bisping, AP Kim Potter resigned from the Brooklyn Center Police Department in Minnesota.

Bernie Madoff dies in prison

The crimes committed by financier Bernie Madoff, who died Wednesday, have faded from the headlines, but his Ponzi scheme, the largest in history, was one of the biggest financial stories of the past decade. Madoff, 82, was once deemed a Wall Street wizard. The former Nasdaq stock market chairman was known for investments that gave his clients large, unusually steady returns. In 2009, he admitted to swindling thousands of clients out of billions of dollars in investments over decades. They reportedly included baseball legend Sandy Koufax, Hollywood titan Jeffrey Katzenberg and actors Kevin Bacon and John Malkovich. Madoff was sentenced to 150 years in prison, a true lifetime term more typical of the sentences imposed on the worst mobsters and violent criminals.

Attorneys at Chauvin trial in Floyd death make final pitch

  Attorneys at Chauvin trial in Floyd death make final pitch MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Attorneys in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd are set to make their closing arguments Monday, each side seeking to distill three weeks of testimony to persuade jurors to deliver their view of the right verdict. For prosecutors, Derek Chauvin recklessly squeezed the life from Floyd as he and two other officers pinned him to the street for 9 minutes, 29 seconds outside a corner market, despite Floyd's repeated cries that he couldn't breathe — actions they say warrant conviction not just for manslaughter but also on two murder counts.

  • Who did Bernie Madoff's Ponzi scheme affect and how did he get caught? Your questions answered.

What everybody's talking about

  • Family of Adam Toledo views footage of fatal Chicago police shooting of 13-year-old; video will not be immediately released.
  • "Forever War" nevermore: President Biden's Afghanistan plan draws strong Capitol Hill reactions, making some strange alliances.
  • "Pray for the lost": Body found, 12 missing after commercial boat capsizes in stormy Gulf of Mexico.
  • Former "Bachelor" star Colton Underwood comes out as gay. Chris Harrison says he's "very proud" of him.
  • "A long way to go": Why TikTok still has a QAnon and COVID-19 vaccine conspiracy theory problem.
  • Could we save lives by assigning each American a place in line for vaccines?
  • 13 investigations, no court-martials: Here's how the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps quietly discharged white supremacists.

Defense medical expert: George Floyd died from 'sudden cardiac arrhythmia'

In the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, the death of George Floyd has been labeled as a homicide. On Wednesday, however, a medical expert testifying for the defense told jurors the manner of the death was "undetermined." David Fowler, former head of the medical examiner's office in Maryland, said he believes that Floyd, because of his underlying heart issues, had a "sudden cardiac arrhythmia" while being restrained and subdued by police. Judge Peter Cahill quashed a subpoena for testimony from Morries Hall, a man who was in a car with George Floyd before the fateful struggle with police. Cahill ruled that Hall has a Fifth Amendment right not to testify because answering even narrowly tailored questions could expose him to criminal charges.

Derek Chauvin jury reaches verdict in George Floyd's death: Live updates

  Derek Chauvin jury reaches verdict in George Floyd's death: Live updates The jury has reached a verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer charged with the murder of George Floyd last May. © AP In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin listens as his defense attorney Eric Nelson gives closing arguments as Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill preside Monday, April 19, 2021, in the trial of Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. The verdict will be read between 3:30 and 4 p.m. CT, according to the court. Chauvin was at the courthouse with his attorney.

a man wearing a suit and tie: David Fowler, former head of the medical examiner's office in Maryland, testifies about George Floyd's heart trouble April 14 in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse. © AP David Fowler, former head of the medical examiner's office in Maryland, testifies about George Floyd's heart trouble April 14 in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse.

Real quick

  • Molly Lillard, Michigan Wolverines volleyball standout and daughter of former NFL WR Al Toon, found dead in a possible murder-suicide.
  • Could D.C. and Puerto Rico become the next U.S. states? Here's what Congress is considering.
  • The price of Dogecoin, created to poke fun at cryptocurrency, is above 10 cents.
  • Texans asked to conserve electricity as power grid again strained – this time amid mild weather, maintenance.
  • After 25 years, arrest in Kristin Smart case brings relief and new anguish.

Vaccine shortage? Never heard of her

We've got enough vaccine to make up for the pause. ???? Daily doses across the nation could be affected by the pause in Johnson & Johnson vaccinations but should have little long-term effect on the drive to end the pandemic,, the White House COVID-19 response coordinator said. There are plenty of doses of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to make up any shortfall of the single-shot J&J vaccine. The United States is on track to acquire 600 million of double-shot doses from those companies by the end of July. Presidential medical adviser Anthony Fauci took an optimistic approach, saying the pause showed dedication to safety. A panel of experts begins scrutinizing the J&J vaccine today after six reported U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot linked to the one-shot inoculation.

George Floyd's Family Says 'Today We Are Able to Breathe Again' After Derek Chauvin Is Found Guilty

  George Floyd's Family Says 'Today We Are Able to Breathe Again' After Derek Chauvin Is Found Guilty "Justice for George means freedom for all," George Floyd's brother Philonise said after a guilty verdict convicted former police officer Derek Chauvin for murder"Today we are able to breathe again," his brother, Philonise Floyd, said at a news conference, referencing George's repeated cries of "I can't breathe" as the white Minneapolis officer, Derek Chauvin, pressed his knee into George's neck for about nine minutes while George, a Black man, lay on the ground with his hands cuffed behind him.

  • Blood clots and COVID-19 vaccines: How scientists are starting to unravel the rare side effect of the J&J and AstraZeneca vaccines.

???? Earth contains multitudes

Just when we thought we knew what was going on (ha ha), scientists discovered yet another layer deep inside the core of the Earth. Not sure whether they asked Earth for her ideas on what to name the new layer, but researchers call it Earth's "innermost inner core." Great name. The existence of this new layer is difficult to observe but could point to an unknown, dramatic event in Earth's history, according to a study that really just makes it sound like Earth was keeping it a secret for a reason. Researchers will keep researching to see what else they can find.

A break from the news

  • Bugged by cicadas? Try walking around in your own personalized mesh pod. You'll look ridiculous, but fashion is pain.
  • Working from home: 6 in 10 parents want to keep it up after COVID-19.
  • Can you get pregnant while you're already pregnant? It's rare, but yes.

This is a compilation of stories from across the USA TODAY Network. Want this news roundup in your inbox every night? Sign up for The Short List newsletter here.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: The charge: Manslaughter

Minneapolis Police: Here are some of the cases the US Justice Department may look into as they investigate Minneapolis policing practices .
What the federal investigation is doing is assessing MPD's uses of excessive force, examining if the department misrepresents interactions in its community and reviewing MPD's "systems of accountability," according to Attorney General Merrick Garland. Garland did not specify exactly the time frame or what cases would be examined in this probe. Since 2015, there have been at least seven deaths in Minneapolis and its surrounding areas that have made national headlines.

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This is interesting!