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US Judge in Chauvin trial calls Waters' comments 'abhorrent'

02:55  20 april  2021
02:55  20 april  2021 Source:   msn.com

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd 's death enters its third week Monday, with the state nearing the end of a case built on searing witness accounts, official rejections of the neck restraint and expert testimony attributing Floyd's death to a lack of oxygen. Derek Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s May 25 death. Police were called to a neighborhood market where Floyd, who was Black, was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit bill.

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge overseeing the trial of former Officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd on Monday called recent comments from a California congresswoman “abhorrent," saying they could lead to a verdict being appealed and overturned.

In this image from video, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill reads instructions to the jury before closing arguments, Monday, April 19, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool) © Provided by Associated Press In this image from video, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill reads instructions to the jury before closing arguments, Monday, April 19, 2021, in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Democratic U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters had joined protesters on Saturday outside the police department of a Minneapolis suburb where a police officer fatally shot a Black motorist earlier this month. Waters, who is Black, told the crowd she wanted to see a murder conviction for Floyd’s death.

EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs

  EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge overseeing the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer in the death of George Floyd said Monday that he'll leave it up to the jury to sort out whether Floyd yelled “I ate too many drugs” or “I ain’t do no drugs” as three officers pinned him to the ground. Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill made the ruling as attorneys argued over whether to allow the testimony of a use-of-force expert for the prosecution, Seth Stoughton, a professor at the University of South Carolina Law School. Prosecutors wanted him to testify from an academic perspective on whether Chauvin used reasonable force and about national policing standards.

In this image from video, defense attorney Eric Nelson, left, and defendant, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listen to Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill read instructions to the jury before closing arguments, Monday, April 19, 2021, in the trial of Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool) © Provided by Associated Press In this image from video, defense attorney Eric Nelson, left, and defendant, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listen to Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill read instructions to the jury before closing arguments, Monday, April 19, 2021, in the trial of Chauvin at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis. Chauvin is charged in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

When asked what should happen if Chauvin isn’t convicted on murder charges, she replied, “We gotta stay on the street, we’ve got to get more active, we’ve got to get more confrontational, we’ve got to make sure that they know that we mean business.”

Minneapolis is on edge as it anticipates the outcome of Chauvin’s trial and reels from the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in Brooklyn Center.

The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill.

  The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill. While Judge Peter Cahill allowed cameras in the courtroom for the first time in Minnesota state history, he's also been strict on other matters.That is exactly where Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill finds himself in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, entering its sixth week and bringing daily controversy and scrutiny to every step taken in the courtroom.

Judge Peter Cahill showed frustration with Waters' rhetoric shortly after the jury was dismissed Monday to begin deliberations. Chauvin's defense attorney had motioned for a mistrial in light of Waters' comments. Cahill denied the motion but called it “disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch" for elected officials to comment on the outcome of the case.

“Their failure to do so, I think, is abhorrent, he said. ”But I don’t think it has prejudiced us with additional material that would prejudice this jury. They have been told not to watch the news. I trust they are following those instructions."

A spokesman for Waters didn't immediately respond to a message seeking comment.

Conservatives have seized on Waters' comments, saying she is inflaming tensions as Minneapolis looks to prevent looting and destruction that occurred after Floyd's death last year.

EXPLAINER: Why is 'excited delirium' cited at Chauvin trial?

  EXPLAINER: Why is 'excited delirium' cited at Chauvin trial? MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The attorney for the former Minneapolis police officer on trial in George Floyd ’s death revisited the disputed concept of excited delirium Tuesday in an effort to show that the force Derek Chauvin used was objectively reasonable given Floyd's resistance. Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter. Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was arrested outside a neighborhood market on May 25, accused of trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill. A panicky-sounding Floyd struggled and claimed to be claustrophobic as police tried to put him in a squad car.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki was asked at Monday's daily White House briefing if Biden agrees with Waters' comment, but she attempted to tamp down the president's stance.

“He recognizes the issue of police violence against people of color, communities of color is one of great anguish, and it’s exhausting and quite emotional at times," she said, adding, "But as he also always says, protests must be peaceful. That’s what he continues to call for.”

Waters has been a galvanizing figure for decades, visiting communities nationwide to advocate for racial and economic justice, and an end to police violence.

It’s no surprise she would appear in Minnesota. She began focusing on policing issues in 1979 after the police shooting of a Black woman during a confrontation in Los Angeles over an unpaid gas bill and was a leading voice advocate for policing changes in the aftermath of the videotaped beating of Black motorist Rodney King by LAPD officers.

Over three decades in Congress, the Los Angeles-area congresswoman has drawn criticism from Republicans and conservatives, who were quick to seize on her comments Monday.

Attorneys at Chauvin trial in Floyd death make final pitch

  Attorneys at Chauvin trial in Floyd death make final pitch MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Attorneys in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd are set to make their closing arguments Monday, each side seeking to distill three weeks of testimony to persuade jurors to deliver their view of the right verdict. For prosecutors, Derek Chauvin recklessly squeezed the life from Floyd as he and two other officers pinned him to the street for 9 minutes, 29 seconds outside a corner market, despite Floyd's repeated cries that he couldn't breathe — actions they say warrant conviction not just for manslaughter but also on two murder counts.

The House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy said on Twitter that he was introducing a resolution to censure Waters “for these dangerous comments.”

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said in a speech that “it’s harder to imagine anything more inappropriate than a member of Congress flying in from California to inform local leaders, not so subtly, that this defendant had better be found guilty.”

Still, Waters has allies as a longstanding and senior member of Congress.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Waters’ comments should be viewed in the context of the long struggle toward civil rights.

“Maxine talked about confrontation in the manner of the Civil Rights movement,” Pelosi told reporters at the Capitol.

Asked if Waters should apologize, Pelosi said no.

“I myself think we should take our lead from the George Floyd family. They’ve handled this with great dignity, and no ambiguity or lack of misinterpretation by the other side,” Pelosi said.

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Mascaro reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Aamer Madhani contributed reporting from Chicago.

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Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd

DOJ weighs charging Chauvin for 2017 incident involving Black teen: Source .
Federal investigators probing Derek Chauvin's use of force against George Floyd are also weighing charging him for a 2017 incident involving a Black teen, a source said. The videos, from Sept. 4, 2017, allegedly showed Chauvin striking a Black teenager in the head so hard that the boy needed stitches, then allegedly holding the boy down with his knee for nearly 17 minutes, and allegedly ignoring complaints from the boy that he couldn't breathe.

usr: 1
This is interesting!