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US Tucker Carlson suggests Chauvin jurors intimidated by protests: 'Please don't hurt us'

17:46  21 april  2021
17:46  21 april  2021 Source:   thehill.com

EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs

  EXPLAINER: Judge lets jury decide Floyd's remark about drugs MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The judge overseeing the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer in the death of George Floyd said Monday that he'll leave it up to the jury to sort out whether Floyd yelled “I ate too many drugs” or “I ain’t do no drugs” as three officers pinned him to the ground. Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill made the ruling as attorneys argued over whether to allow the testimony of a use-of-force expert for the prosecution, Seth Stoughton, a professor at the University of South Carolina Law School. Prosecutors wanted him to testify from an academic perspective on whether Chauvin used reasonable force and about national policing standards.

Tucker Carlson on Tuesday suggested that the jury in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was pushed to reach a guilty verdict by the possibility of further protests and civil unrest if there was an acquittal.

Tucker Carlson wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Tucker Carlson suggests Chauvin jurors intimidated by protests: 'Please don't hurt us' © Getty images Tucker Carlson suggests Chauvin jurors intimidated by protests: 'Please don't hurt us'

The Fox News host opened his Tuesday edition of "Tucker Carlson Tonight" by commenting on the decision by the jury in the Chauvin trial to find the former officer guilty on all charges in the murder of George Floyd.

Carlson began, "The jury in the Derek Chauvin trial came to a unanimous and unequivocal verdict Tuesday afternoon: 'Please don't hurt us.' "

Defense set to take turn in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Defense set to take turn in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The defense for a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd's death was set to start presenting its case Tuesday, following 11 days of a prosecution narrative that combined wrenching video with clinical analysis by medical and use-of-force experts to condemn Derek Chauvin's actions. Prosecutors called their final witnesses Monday, leaving only some administrative matters before they were expected to rest Tuesday. Once the defense takes over, Chauvin attorney Eric Nelson is expected to have his own experts testify that it was Floyd's drug use and bad heart, not Chauvin's actions, that killed him.

"The jurors spoke for many in this country; everyone understood perfectly well the consequences of an acquittal in this case," the conservative TV personality continued. "After nearly a year of burning, looting, and murder by BLM [Black Lives Matter], that was never in doubt."

"Last night, 2,000 miles from Minneapolis, police in Los Angeles preemptively blocked roads. Why? They knew what would happen if Derek Chauvin got off," he added.

The trial outcome was praised by activists and elected officials alike, including President Biden, who ahead of the announcement Tuesday told reporters he was "praying" for a guilty verdict.

Carlson on Tuesday suggested that such commentary tainted Chauvin's access to a fair trial.

"In the end, he didn't get off. If given the maximum sentence under the law, he will spend the rest of his life in prison," Carlson said. "Is that a fair punishment? Is the officer guilty of the specific crimes for which he was just convicted?"

EXPLAINER: How is 'reasonableness' key to Chauvin's defense?

  EXPLAINER: How is 'reasonableness' key to Chauvin's defense? CHICAGO (AP) — Attorneys and witnesses have used the words “reasonable” or “unreasonable” often at the trial of the former Minneapolis police officer charged with murder and manslaughter in George Floyd's death. It's no coincidence. The concept of reasonableness has been crucial at trials of officers ever since the landmark Graham v. Connor ruling 32 years ago by the U.S. Supreme Court. Here is a look at the issue and the key role it's likely toIt's no coincidence. The concept of reasonableness has been crucial at trials of officers ever since the landmark Graham v. Connor ruling 32 years ago by the U.S. Supreme Court.

"We can debate all that, and over this hour we will," he added. "But here's what we can't debate: No mob has the right to destroy our cities. Not under any circumstances, not for any reason."

"No politician or media figure has the right to intimidate a jury, and no political party has the right to impose a different standard of justice on its own supporters," he said, adding that these actions are "an attack on civilization."

Carlson then asked, "So before we consider the details of Tuesday's verdict, a bigger question, one we should all think about: Can we trust the way this decision was made?"

Following about 10 hours of deliberations, the jury on Tuesday found Chauvin guilty on three criminal counts - second-degree murder, second-degree manslaughter and third-degree murder.

Chauvin was immediately taken into custody with his bail revoked and later Tuesday was transferred to the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Oak Park Heights.

Chauvin's sentencing will take place in the coming weeks. The former cop could face up to 40 years in prison for second-degree murder, a maximum of 25 years for third-degree murder and up to 10 years for manslaughter.

Tucker Carlson, the Chauvin verdict and the burden of "white civilization" .
Tucker Carlson called Chauvin's conviction "an attack on civilization." He had a specific definition in mind Tucker Carlson and Derek Chauvin Photo illustration by Salon/Getty Images

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This is interesting!