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US Restored greyhound bus unveiled for Freedom Rides' 60th anniversary

00:45  05 may  2021
00:45  05 may  2021 Source:   nbcnews.com

Alabama museum unveils restored Greyhound bus for Freedom Rides' 60th anniversary

  Alabama museum unveils restored Greyhound bus for Freedom Rides' 60th anniversary The Alabama Historical Commission on Tuesday officially unveiled a restored Greyhound bus as part of a 60th anniversary exhibit commemorating the 1961 Freedom Rides protesting the segregation of bus terminals. The commission unveiled the bus, which was in service at the time of the protests, during a ceremony at its Freedom Rides Museum in Montgomery, Ala., on Tuesday to mark the date the first group of Freedom Riders left on a bus from Washington, D.C., to New Orleans. Among the first 13 riders was young civil rights leader John Lewis, who went on to represent Georgia for decades in the U.S. House.

A restored vintage Greyhound bus was unveiled Tuesday morning to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Freedom Rides.

a bus that is parked on the side of a building © Provided by NBC News

The bus, which was in service during the Freedom Rides — a series of political protests against racial segregation in 1961 — was unveiled at the Alabama Historical Commission's Freedom Rides Museum in downtown Montgomery. The date of the unveiling coincides with the day the first Freedom Riders left Washington, D.C., bound for New Orleans to protest segregated interstate transportation terminals.

“As we celebrate the arrival of the restored Greyhound Bus and its symbolic representation of the courage of the Freedom Riders, we also commemorate the 60th anniversary of the rides and their impact on equal rights for all Americans,” Alabama Historical Commission Chairman Eddie Griffith said in a press release.

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The Freedom Riders, who included Black and white civil rights activists, participated in the bus trips throughout the Jim Crow South. Organized by the Congress of Racial Equality, the purpose of the rides was to pressure the U.S. government to enforce the 1960 Supreme Court ruling in Boynton v. Virginia, which made it unconstitutional to segregate interstate transportation facilities, including bus terminals.

Image: Restored vintage Greyhound bus (Alabama Historical Commission) © Alabama Historical Commission Image: Restored vintage Greyhound bus (Alabama Historical Commission)

Thirteen riders, including John Lewis, the civil rights leader who went on to become a congressman from Georgia, left the nation's capital May 4 to reach New Orleans. However white mobs attacked the riders at bus stations.

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The violence grabbed the attention of then-U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, who negotiated with Alabama's then-Gov. John Patterson, to secure protection for the riders. However, as the riders departed Montgomery for Jackson, Mississippi, on the morning of May 20, a white mob attacked them with clubs and baseball bats. Police were nowhere in sight.

The rides continued over several months and, as the violence received national attention and hundreds of riders joined the movement, increased pressure from the administration of President John F. Kennedy led to the Interstate Commerce Commission officially prohibiting segregation in interstate transportation terminals.

The restored bus will become a permanent exhibit of the museum.

Tuesday's ceremony will include Bernard Lafayette Jr., one of the student riders attacked at the Montgomery bus station. The event will also mark the 10th anniversary of the museum itself, which is located at the Greyhound bus station where the Freedom Riders arrived.

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“History happened here," said Lisa D. Jones, executive director of the historical commission and the state historic preservation officer. "Preserving this place helps bring to life a critical part of the civil rights story, and the role Montgomery and the state of Alabama played in it."

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This is interesting!