•   
  •   
  •   

US US judge weighs if PG&E violated probation with 2019 fire

03:55  05 may  2021
03:55  05 may  2021 Source:   msn.com

Angels, Yankees reportedly discussed Aaron Judge trade in offseason

  Angels, Yankees reportedly discussed Aaron Judge trade in offseason The Angels had trade talks with the Yankees about Aaron Judge this winter, ESPN.com’s Buster Olney reports, but it sounds as if the discussions were little more than due diligence.  “It was the lightest of flirtations,” as Olney put it, “and perhaps a door-opener for other names.”  No details about the specific nature of the talks were mentioned, but it’s safe to assume the Angels explored some bigger outfield names like Judge before eventually landing Dexter Fowler in a salary dump of a trade from the Cardinals.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge is weighing whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation by sparking a wildfire north of San Francisco that destroyed more than 100 homes and injured six firefighters in October 2019.

FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2019, file photo, flames from the Kincade Fire consume Soda Rock Winery in Healdsburg, Calif. A California prosecutor has charged troubled Pacific Gas & Electric with starting a 2019 wildfire. District Judge William Alsup overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's criminal probation is holding a hearing Tuesday, May 4, 2021, to consider whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation from a fatal 2010 natural gas explosion by sparking the October 2019 Kincade Fire north of San Francisco.(AP Photo/Noah Berger, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2019, file photo, flames from the Kincade Fire consume Soda Rock Winery in Healdsburg, Calif. A California prosecutor has charged troubled Pacific Gas & Electric with starting a 2019 wildfire. District Judge William Alsup overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's criminal probation is holding a hearing Tuesday, May 4, 2021, to consider whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation from a fatal 2010 natural gas explosion by sparking the October 2019 Kincade Fire north of San Francisco.(AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

Prosecutors and attorneys for PG&E appeared at a hearing Tuesday before U.S. District Judge William Alsup, a month after the Sonoma County district attorney charged the company with five felony and 28 misdemeanor counts for a fire that destroyed 374 buildings and launched the largest evacuation in the county’s history, with nearly 100,000 people forced to flee.

The Chauvin Trial’s Jury Wasn’t Like Other Juries

  The Chauvin Trial’s Jury Wasn’t Like Other Juries Its guilty verdict resulted not just from the strength of the evidence, but from a jury-selection process that departed from American norms.But even with all that evidence, convictions don’t happen on their own. Twelve people, selected by lot from the public, must come to a unanimous decision. That jury—who it comprised, how those people saw the world—was of enormous consequence. This wasn’t just any jury, and the difference that made should invite a major reckoning with how juries—the deciding bodies of the country’s judicial system—are selected in America.

FILE - In this June 7, 2019, file photo, William Johnson, left, the chief executive officer for Pacific Gas & Electric Co., leaves the Paradise Performing Arts Center during a tour of fire ravaged Paradise, Calif. Johnson, the PG&E board and others leaders were ordered by United States District Judge William Alsup to tour the destruction caused last November's Camp Fire. U.S. District Judge William Alsup overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's criminal probation is holding a hearing Tuesday, May 4, 2021, to consider whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation from a fatal 2010 natural gas explosion by sparking the October 2019 Kincade Fire north of San Francisco. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this June 7, 2019, file photo, William Johnson, left, the chief executive officer for Pacific Gas & Electric Co., leaves the Paradise Performing Arts Center during a tour of fire ravaged Paradise, Calif. Johnson, the PG&E board and others leaders were ordered by United States District Judge William Alsup to tour the destruction caused last November's Camp Fire. U.S. District Judge William Alsup overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's criminal probation is holding a hearing Tuesday, May 4, 2021, to consider whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation from a fatal 2010 natural gas explosion by sparking the October 2019 Kincade Fire north of San Francisco. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

PG&E has accepted investigators’ findings that its transmission line ignited the fire that burned through 120 square miles (311 square kilometers), but it has denied committing any crimes. It is trying to have two-thirds of the charges thrown out on the grounds that its alleged violations of state air pollution laws don’t constitute a crime.

Karen Boes Got Life for Her Daughter’s Fiery Death. But Was the Conviction Based on Junk Science?

  Karen Boes Got Life for Her Daughter’s Fiery Death. But Was the Conviction Based on Junk Science? Karen Sue Boes has been insisting she did not kill her 14-year-old daughter Robin since the day her Zeeland, Michigan, house caught on fire almost two decades ago. As police interrogated her multiple times over six weeks, the 65-year-old maintained she was out shopping with a friend when the tragic fire broke out, killing Robin. But during one grueling questioning on Aug. 7, 2002, police eventually got her to admit she possibly started the fire while in a “dream” or “unconscious” state. “They had me really disoriented,” Boes told The Daily Beast in a phone interview from the Women’s Huron Valley Correctional Facility on Thursday.

FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2010, file photo, a Pacific Gas & Electric natural gas line lies broken on a San Bruno, Calif., road after a massive explosion. U.S. prosecutors are urging a federal judge to work with a court-appointed monitor to determine ways Pacific Gas & Electric Co. can prevent its equipment from starting more wildfires. District Judge William Alsup overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's criminal probation is holding a hearing Tuesday, May 4, 2021, to consider whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation from a fatal 2010 natural gas explosion by sparking the October 2019 Kincade Fire north of San Francisco.(AP Photo/Noah Berger, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2010, file photo, a Pacific Gas & Electric natural gas line lies broken on a San Bruno, Calif., road after a massive explosion. U.S. prosecutors are urging a federal judge to work with a court-appointed monitor to determine ways Pacific Gas & Electric Co. can prevent its equipment from starting more wildfires. District Judge William Alsup overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's criminal probation is holding a hearing Tuesday, May 4, 2021, to consider whether Pacific Gas & Electric violated its criminal probation from a fatal 2010 natural gas explosion by sparking the October 2019 Kincade Fire north of San Francisco.(AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

Federal probation officer Jennifer Hutchings alleged that the 2019 Kincade Fire violated the company’s probation from the 2010 explosion in its natural gas lines that blew up a neighborhood in San Bruno, a suburb south of San Francisco, which led to Alsup’s appointment overseeing the utility’s operations.

Urban Meyer weighs in on Tim Tebow possibly joining Jaguars

  Urban Meyer weighs in on Tim Tebow possibly joining Jaguars Meyer did add that he was dissatisfied with the Jaguars’ current crop of tight ends, although Jacksonville drafted Ohio State’s Luke Farrell in the fifth round. The coach said the position was “a concern” for the Jaguars, adding that if Tebow could help Jacksonville win, Meyer would be in favor of adding his former quarterback at Florida.“I have one job, and that is to win games with the Jacksonville Jaguars. If Tim Tebow or Travis Etienne can help us win, then that’s my job to get them ready to go play,” Meyer added. “That decision is certainly not made yet.

One of the probation terms was that the utility, which serves about 16 million people, not commit another federal, state or local crime.

Alsup said he will consider imposing additional probation conditions because of the fire, adding that “losing 100 homes is catastrophic really. There’s no other way to describe it.”

The judge has repeatedly found that the company violated other probation conditions, and each time has imposed more conditions on the company.

PG&E last year pleaded guilty to 84 felony counts of involuntary manslaughter igniting the 2018 Camp Fire in Butte County that largely destroyed the town of Paradise in the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s recorded history.

Ratepayer advocate and former San Diego city attorney Michael Aguirre argued Tuesday that PG&E is intent on running out the clock without making any fundamental changes to improve safety before Alsup’s supervision ends in January.

“They are a convicted felon on probation who has just been found to have engaged in additional safety violations that have caused 100 homes to be destroyed,” Aguirre said.

Josh Duggar Will Be Released into Custody of 'Close Friends' of the Family, Lacount and Maria Reber

  Josh Duggar Will Be Released into Custody of 'Close Friends' of the Family, Lacount and Maria Reber On Wednesday, a judge ruled that Duggar, 33, will be released to designated third party custodians, Lacount and Maria Reber, described in court as "close friends" of the Duggar familyOn Wednesday, a judge ruled that Duggar, 33, will be released to designated third party custodians, Lacount and Maria Reber, described in court as "close friends" of the Duggar family.

Company attorney Reid Schar responded that the utility’s executives take their responsibility very seriously.

Alsup said he is highly unlikely to accept a proposal by Aguirre for him to appoint a trustee or receiver to oversee the utility, in part because PG&E's federal probation term runs out in January. Alsup said he has no power to extend it, so any overseer would also lose power in January.

Holding hearings to weigh whether to appoint a trustee would also divert staff from their primary duty of preventing the company’s equipment from sparking more wildfires as California enters what officials fear will be a particularly dangerous drought-driven wildfire season.

“Fire season is very close and I don’t mind distracting the lawyers, but I do mind distracting the people who have to direct the fire prevention activities at PG&E,” the judge said.

Separately, Alsup has been considering an order that could force the utility to deliberately turn off power more frequently to reduce wildfire risks. The California Public Utilities Commission objected that the plan could double the number of blackouts in some rural Northern California counties over the next decade.

The state commission last month also increased its oversight of the utility after determining that it neglected maintenance of its electrical grid, thereby igniting a series of deadly wildfires and forcing precautionary blackouts affecting millions of people across Northern California.

The problems cited by both Alsup and state regulators include poor care of antiquated equipment and preventing trees from falling on to power lines.

Alsup also noted that in another year the utility will “be rid of me," but he added: “I do have eight or nine more months to go, and I plan to use that as fairly as I can.”

He set another hearing for June 2.

___

Associated Press writer Michael Liedtke contributed to this story.

Exclusive: Biden names new federal judges, including a Bush nominee, with an emphasis on diversity .
Biden is filling federal judgeships with an eye toward racial and professional diversity. The White House is now unveiling its next round of nominees.Among the new federal judge candidates Biden will be sending to the Senate for confirmation: The first Native American federal judge in Washington State; the second judge from Puerto Rico to sit on the Boston-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit and the second Black woman to serve on the New York-based 2nd Circuit.

usr: 6
This is interesting!