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US Biden's budget proposal, holiday weekend movies: 5 Things podcast

15:16  28 may  2021
15:16  28 may  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Biden’s $6 trillion budget proposal would rebuild America’s social safety net

  Biden’s $6 trillion budget proposal would rebuild America’s social safety net Biden’s first budget aims to herald a new era of big governmentAs proposed, the budget would reinvest in infrastructure and education, raise taxes on the wealthy and corporations, and meet many — but not all — of Biden’s campaign promises. It also represents the most substantial expansion of the federal government’s spending powers since World War II and a direct rebuttal of the small-government principles of his Republican, and even many Democratic, predecessors.

On today's episode of 5 Things: The White House details the plan and its financial impact. USA TODAY's Elizabeth Weise discusses what doctors are saying about masks, Oprah & Prince Harry have a free special out on Apple TV + and our Mothership podcast crew recommends the best movies for this Memorial Day weekend.

Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: President Joe Biden on May 27, 2021, in Cleveland, Ohio. © Evan Vucci/AP President Joe Biden on May 27, 2021, in Cleveland, Ohio.

Hit play on the podcast player above and read along with the transcript below.

Shannon Rae Green:

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Good morning. I'm Shannon Rae Green. And this is 5 Things You Need to Know Friday, the 20th of May 2021. Today, the White House will lay out President Biden's budget proposal, which is expected to increase the nation's federal debt. Plus, after a year of almost no colds or runny noses, those pesky minor viruses are back as COVID-19 restrictions ease.

Biden budget to run $1.8T deficit to finance spending plans

  Biden budget to run $1.8T deficit to finance spending plans WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's $6 trillion budget proposal for next year would run a $1.8 trillion federal government deficit despite a raft of new tax increases on corporations and high-income people designed to pay for his ambitious spending plans. Biden had already announced his major budget initiatives, but during a rollout Friday, he will wrap them into a single proposal to incorporate them into the government's existing budgetBiden had already announced his major budget initiatives, but during a rollout Friday, he will wrap them into a single proposal to incorporate them into the government's existing budget framework, including Social Security and Medicare.

Here are some of the top headlines:

  1. California is hopping on the trend of cash prizes for vaccinated individuals. 10 vaccinated residents, 12 years and older will have the chance to win $1.5 million a piece. Another 30 will win $50,000 each on June 4th and June 11th. Anyone 12 and older who has received at least one shot will be eligible, even if they have already received their shot. The state is also giving $50 grocery or prepaid gift cards to the next two million Californians who begin and complete their vaccinations starting this past Thursday.
  2. Bill Cosby has been denied parole after refusing sex offender treatment. He's nearly three years into his sentence in a Pennsylvania State prison. The 83-year-old actor was convicted of sexual assault in 2018.
  3. Friends: The Reunion has arrived on HBO Max and David Schwimmer reveals he had a "major crush" on Jennifer Aniston and she says it was reciprocated. Schwimmer says that one of them was always in a relationship so the timing was never right.

Shannon Rae Green:

Social spending, business tax hike drive $6T Biden budget

  Social spending, business tax hike drive $6T Biden budget WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's $6 trillion budget proposal for next year would run a $1.8 trillion federal government deficit despite a raft of new tax increases on corporations and high-income people designed to pay for his ambitious spending plans. Biden had already announced his major budget initiatives, but during a rollout Friday he will release them as a single proposal to incorporate them into the government's existing budgetBiden had already announced his major budget initiatives, but during a rollout Friday he will release them as a single proposal to incorporate them into the government's existing budget framework, including Social Security and Medicare.

President Joe Biden has spent weeks touting the benefits of his proposed spending increases. On Friday, the White House will examine the effects of his first budget plan on federal debt. The plan is already giving fodder for critics after the New York Times reported that by 2024, debt would be larger as a share of the economy than it was during World War II. The campaign arm for House Republicans called Biden's reported $6 trillion budget plan "insane." The president spoke last month about his plan's focus on healthcare spending.

President Biden:

This is a pioneer breakthrough that we hope we can detect and treat, prevent diseases like Alzheimer's and diabetes, and give us a chance to end cancer as we know it, because we'll focus exclusively on those items. And secondly, I'm proposing a historic funding increase of 50% of $4 billion in the opioid crisis, which still ravages the country and has taken so many lives over the last two years.

Biden Goes Big in First Budget Proposal

  Biden Goes Big in First Budget Proposal The plan reflects a new populist approach Biden has taken to budgeting – spend big and bank on those investments paying off in a stronger economy, higher wages and reduced poverty. "Where we choose to invest speaks to what we value as a Nation," Biden said in his opening statement to Congress. "This year's Budget, the first of my Presidency, is a statement of values that define our Nation at its best. It is a Budget for what our economy can be, who our economy can serve, and how we can build it back better by putting the needs, goals, ingenuity, and strength of the American people front and center.

Shannon Rae Green:

Progressives have defended Biden's plan. Some argue there's no reason to believe that the faster debt growth under Biden's proposal would hurt the economy and that the spending boost are needed to grow jobs and middle-class incomes.

Doctors say there's a downside to returning to pre-COVID-19 hygiene habits. Colds and sore throats are back. I spoke with USA Today health reporter Beth Weise about why you may want to keep your mask on, even if you're vaccinated.

Beth Weise:

Gosh, all the things that we did to protect ourselves against COVID, it meant that we didn't have colds for a year. You didn't have the sniffles. People weren't getting strep throat. You didn't get norovirus. You didn't get stomach bugs. It was kind of nice for a whole year, nothing. And now that people are starting to take off their mask because they're vaccinated and they're starting to interact again, we forget that if you're vaccinated, it means that yes, you can't get COVID, but it doesn't mean that you can't get a cold. There's a couple of things that are endemic to humans that give you the sniffles and maybe a headache for a couple of days, and those are still out there. And as soon as we stop doing all the mask wearing and social distancing, they're still there and they'll get us.

President Biden's budget proposal expected to increase the federal debt

  President Biden's budget proposal expected to increase the federal debt The federal debt, already on track to rise to high levels, could go up faster under President Joe Biden's first budget proposal.The plan is already giving fodder for critics, after the New York Times reported Thursday that, by 2024, debt would be larger as a share of the economy than it was during World War II.

You basically have to presume that wherever you are, there are either people who are not vaccinated or who are immunocompromised and are still at risk, even if they were able to get vaccinated themselves. And so I certainly still wear my mask when I go to the grocery store or the drug store. I mean, basically any time I'm out among people, I wear a mask because it's kind of the polite thing to do. The vaccine makes sure that even if you get COVID, it is very, very mild, but that means that you could have it and transmit it to somebody for whom it wouldn't be mild.

The important thing to remember is the pandemic isn't over, it's getting better. And if we keep doing all the things that we've been doing... I mean, the great news is if you're vaccinated... I actually had a dinner party the other week, which was wow! I hadn't had people in my house that sit down around a table without masks in more than a year. It was very exciting, but we can do those things now because with the vaccine we're protected. But we have to remember that a lot of people haven't gotten vaccinated yet and we're still trending downwards. So we still have to keep... be aware that this virus is out there and it hasn't entirely gone away. And we need to do our part to help it go away.

Shannon Rae Green:

Oprah and Prince Harry are hosting a follow-up town hall as part of their mental health series that comes out this Friday on Apple TV+. It will be available for free on the streaming platform. The mental health series was co-created by Winfrey and the Duke of Sussex. It's called "The Me You Can't See." The pair also serve as executive producers of the five-part series and have conversations about their own emotional experiences throughout the episodes. Prince Harry spoke to the associate about what he's learned about managing his own mental health.

Biden releases $6T budget that foresees decade of trillion-dollar deficits

  Biden releases $6T budget that foresees decade of trillion-dollar deficits President Biden on Friday proposed a budget that would entrench deficits in excess of $1 trillion for the next decade, pushing the nation's debt burden to record highs.The blueprint released by the White House ties together three major spending proposals already announced by Biden: the $2.3 trillion American Jobs Plan, the $1.8 trillion American Families Plan and $1.5 trillion in discretionary spending for fiscal 2022.Combined with mandatoryThe blueprint released by the White House ties together three major spending proposals already announced by Biden: the $2.3 trillion American Jobs Plan, the $1.8 trillion American Families Plan and $1.5 trillion in discretionary spending for fiscal 2022.

Prince Harry:

People are triggered by all sorts of things. One threat that is sort of whirling through all the stories, which is, OK, the condition doesn't define you, but you still have to be able to manage it. But as I've learned over the years, so many of us, probably 99.9% of us are carrying around some form of unresolved grief, trauma, or loss. And that manifests itself, unless we are able to do the very human thing, which is processing grief, processing trauma and processing loss. And part of that needs to be conversation with friends, with strangers, with therapists, going for a walk, whatever it is. There are so many things that are good for us. And there are things that are bad for us. I really feel as though we should be focused more on the things that feed our soul.

Shannon Rae Green:

Well, it's a noise some of us are hearing a lot of right now. The cicadas are here. Every 17 years, portions of the Central, Eastern and Southern US see a massive emergence of periodical cicadas. The largest of the many generations of cicadas, Brood X, has surfaced this month, greeting a monstrous cacophony. And for some people, it's a chance to try a rare delicacy. The Cicada Fest at the Green Pharmacy Garden invited folks to snack on the bugs. Here's Veri Tas, an event coordinator at the site of the festival in Maryland.

Veri Tas:

So I was like, maybe if we just air fry them it'll be even better. And it was. And then it was like eating a Cheeto that then later after chewing a little bit tasted like salty peanut butter.

Festival attendee:

Oh, it tastes like peanuts. Yeah, tastes like boiled peanuts. I think I saw that there's some chocolate-covered ones over there.

Biden’s old Senate colleagues don’t recognize his current economics. They’re cool with that.

  Biden’s old Senate colleagues don’t recognize his current economics. They’re cool with that. The White House says there’s no change to his core principles even as he adapts to meet the crises he inherited.In the 1980s, Biden voted for the Reagan tax cuts, significantly reducing the tax rate for high-income earners. In the 1990s, he promoted legislation that would have dramatically restricted deficit spending and backed Clinton-era welfare reform ultimately seen as harmful to working class Black and brown Americans. And as vice president, he negotiated major deals with Republicans that included the extension of the Bush-era tax cuts and domestic spending reductions.

Festival attendee:

We've just had one, hence the chocolate. What does it taste like?

Festival attendee:

Chicken.

Festival attendee:

Chicken?

Shannon Rae Green:

It's officially Memorial Day Weekend. And this year, the vast majority of cinemas are back up and running. Film fans and fanatics can enjoy a holiday weekend full of new movies, both at home and in movie theaters. Two high-profile films premiering Friday include Cruella, starring Emma Stone, and A Quiet Place Part II, which stars Emily Blunt. It's directed by her husband, John Krasinski. Cruella is out in theaters and available on Disney+ with premier access. It is a coming-of-age crime comedy set in 1970s punk London that sees Stone as a young British fashion designer who wants to take down her cruel, icy idol/boss played by Emma Thompson. Eventually she becomes Cruella, one of Disney's all-time Queens of Mean. USA Today's Mothership Podcast hosts, Brian Truitt and Brett Molina, discussed the long-awaited return to the movies.

Emma Stone as Cruella:

But a new day brings new opportunities. And I was ready to make a statement. How does the saying go? I am woman. Hear me roar.

Brian Truitt:

That was from Cruella, the new movie starring Emma Stone as a younger version of the classic Disney villainess. With cinemas back up and running, it looks like we'll actually have a summer movie season for the first time in two years.

Brett Molina:

Woo!

Brian Truitt:

I know. And it starts this weekend. Not only Cruella though, but the anticipated A Quiet Place Part II horror sequel. We're going to talk those two, plus our favorite Memorial Day releases from yesteryear. Let's start with Cruella.

Brett Molina:

It's not what you're expecting. It's the coolest Disney film in forever. I don't know if there's been like a cool Disney film like this in a while because it's dark. It kind of like likes to be dark.

Shannon Rae Green:

To listen to the Mothership search for it on whichever podcast app you prefer. We've also dropped a link to the Mothership in the show description for today's episode. You can find 5 Things wherever you get your podcasts, including on Apple, Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts. If you like the show, drop us five stars or a review, if you have a second. Thanks so much to Taylor Wilson and Claire Thornton for their dedicated work on the show. 5 Things is part of the USA TODAY Network.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Biden's budget proposal, holiday weekend movies: 5 Things podcast

Biden proposes to spend big on combatting climate change .
President Joe Biden is proposing massive spending increases across federal agencies to combat the effects of climate change and promote clean energy technologies — though he will have to win support from Congress for his plans to succeed. © Provided by Washington Examiner The White House budget proposal for fiscal year 2022, released Friday, incorporates Biden’s $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan, which already includes significant funding to boost technologies such as renewable energy, electric vehicles, and nascent clean energy technologies such as carbon capture and storage.

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