•   
  •   
  •   

US Migrant Surge Lands 500 Kids in Chicago as Nonprofits Struggle to Provide Care

09:35  05 june  2021
09:35  05 june  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

How best to conserve public and private lands under the 30x30 initiative

  How best to conserve public and private lands under the 30x30 initiative The Biden administration is now embarking on an ambitious program to protect 30 percent of United States lands and waters by 2030.The administration laid out its vision for 30x30 by issuing its "America the Beautiful" report. Unfortunately, it has become obvious that commercial interests also are hard at work to protect their profits by seeking to shift the focus of 30x30 from protection and conservation to "working lands" and "multiple uses," both catchphrases for commercial exploitation that pepper the report.

As migrants continue to enter the country through the nation's southern border, more and more people continue to make their way north. Many of them are children. The city of Chicago , a transportation hub for individuals looking to connect to other destinations, now holds nearly 500 children in the city's shelters, a number not seen since 2014, the Chicago Tribune reported. The number of asylum seekers entering the country remains restricted under Title 42, a policy originally implemented by the Trump administration allowing the nation to turn away those seeking asylum on the basis of pandemic control.

Roughly 10, 500 unaccompanied children are held in “licensed” migrant shelters, suitable for longer-term care for minors, Department of Health and Human Services spokesperson Mark Weber told CBS News on Saturday. But in the meantime, authorities are struggling to find space for another 5,000 “These border facilities are absolutely no place for children, and it's troubling that more access is not provided to press and advocates seeking information about the conditions of children in overcrowded facilities,” Yasmine Taeb, a human rights lawyer and advocate for refugees, said, as cited by the Hill.

As migrants continue to enter the country through the nation's southern border, more and more people continue to make their way north.

a group of young children sitting next to a person: An immigrant family is pictured awaiting COVID-19 test results on February 25, 2021 after being released by U.S. immigration authorities in Brownsville, Texas. © John Moore/Getty Images An immigrant family is pictured awaiting COVID-19 test results on February 25, 2021 after being released by U.S. immigration authorities in Brownsville, Texas.

Many of them are children.

The city of Chicago, a transportation hub for individuals looking to connect to other destinations, now holds nearly 500 children in the city's shelters, a number not seen since 2014, the Chicago Tribune reported.

The number of asylum seekers entering the country remains restricted under Title 42, a policy originally implemented by the Trump administration allowing the nation to turn away those seeking asylum on the basis of pandemic control. But legal action by the ACLU and other human rights groups now permits more individuals to make their way through legally.

‘He’s a man of his word’: Helio Castroneves returns to fans’ home after Indy 500 win

  ‘He’s a man of his word’: Helio Castroneves returns to fans’ home after Indy 500 win Indy 500 winner Helio Castroneves visited with Jameson and Kimmy Terzini before the race as part of a parade. He kept his promise to return if he won.“I said I would, and I will,” Castroneves said.

"We are assessing the Texas directive concerning licensed facilities providing care to unaccompanied children and do not intend to close any facilities as a result of the order," Sarah Lovenheim, assistant secretary for public affairs at HHS, wrote on Twitter. Migrant Surge Lands 500 Kids in Chicago , Nonprofits Strain to Provide Care .

The number of unaccompanied migrant children being kept in cramped government-detention facilities on the US southern border with Mexico has fallen sharply, after a 20-year high influx of border crossings led to overcrowding. The massive influx of children left US immigration officials scrambling earlier this year for facilities to house the children. Mr Biden has urged migrants not to attempt to travel to the US border - "Don't leave your town or city or community," he has said - but with Mr Trump out of office, some believe immigration to the US is now more possible.

Colin McCormick, program director of the nonprofit Chicago Immigrant Transit Assistance, described to Newsweek the waves of asylum seekers at the Chicago Greyhound Bus Station, where his organization provides support for those entering the city as a stop along to way to their final destination.

He said many of the people arrive with next to nothing, in need of support.

"They have literally nothing to their names except for their humanity," McCormick said. "The border is here. The border is in Chicago, and I say that because these people literally are border crossers only 48 hours from that point."

He said he has met asylum seekers with "swollen and puny" feet, having been stuck in wet shoes and socks for days after initially entering the country by crossing the Rio Grande river.

Texas push to close shelters for migrant kids alarms groups

  Texas push to close shelters for migrant kids alarms groups AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A move by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to shutter more than 50 shelters housing about 4,000 migrant children could seriously disrupt a national program that already faces strained capacity to properly care for minors crossing the U.S.-Mexico border alone. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which cares for migrant children, said Wednesday that it did not intend to close any facilities but that it was “assessing” the Republican governor's late Tuesday disaster declaration. The proclamation directs a state agency to deny or discontinue within 90 days licenses for child care facilities sheltering migrant children.

A surge in arrests of unaccompanied minors has created an untenable situation for the Border Patrol and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Sources report as of Tuesday there were more than 6,700 migrants in Border Patrol custody across the United States. As HHS struggles to find suitable shelter for the UACs, the Border Patrol has made attempts to alleviate the overcrowding by busing UACs from the Rio Grande Valley in Texas to other border communities with available bed space. Sources in El Paso, Texas, report that 80% of all migrants detained are UACs.

The greatest need is in the area of “youth care ” and “conducting and translating intake information.” The four locations specifically mentioned are San Diego, California as well as Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Bliss in Texas. NASA just sent employees an email seeking volunteers to help staff facilities for unaccompanied migrant children, per internal email provided to Last month, ABC News reported that NASA has been asked by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for the possible use of the Moffett Federal Airfield in Mountain View, California as a site for housing migrant children.

Many of them own little more than the clothes on their backs and the documentation in their hands, McCormick said. Some step off the Greyhound bus having not been fed during their entire journey, much less been given a toothbrush and toothpaste or a shower.

Despite asylum seekers facing factors such as extreme heat, lack of food, and long distances on foot during their journey north, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) provides little humanitarian relief upon initial processing.

A girl from Central America rests on thermal blankets at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patrol on September 8, 2014 in McAllen, Texas. The Border Patrol opened the holding center to temporarily house the children after tens of thousands of families and unaccompanied minors from Central America crossed the border illegally into the United States during the spring and summer. JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES © JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES A girl from Central America rests on thermal blankets at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patrol on September 8, 2014 in McAllen, Texas. The Border Patrol opened the holding center to temporarily house the children after tens of thousands of families and unaccompanied minors from Central America crossed the border illegally into the United States during the spring and summer. JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES

A report compiled by the ACLU addressed to U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas details incidents of CBP disregarding requests for medical treatment and humanitarian assistance.

Parents desperately need child care. But day cares are struggling to retain workers.

  Parents desperately need child care. But day cares are struggling to retain workers. Half of the day care workers who left early in the COVID pandemic have yet to return to their child care jobs, due to low pay or fear of health risks.The Philadelphia-area mother realized she could either return to work and pay for a babysitter or abandon that job and care for her child, whose school had reverted to distance learning. Bradwell’s daughter, 8, has special needs. The care her child required wasn’t just expensive, it was all but impossible to find.

Asylum-seeking migrant families and unaccompanied minors from Central America take refuge in a makeshift US Customs and Border Protection processing center under the Anzalduas International Bridge after crossing the Rio Grande river into the United States from Mexico in Granjeno, Texas. “We’ve seen surges before. Surges tend to respond to hope,” she said. “There was a significant hope for a more humane policy after four years of pent-up demand.” Asylum-seeking migrant children from Central America take refuge from the rain in the back of a US Border Patrol vehicle.

Migrant Surge Lands 500 Kids in Chicago , Nonprofits Strain to Provide Care . "Once ( migrants are) released from custody, it's all on the NGOs to provide support," Shaw Drake, a Texas-based staff attorney and policy counsel for border and immigrants' rights at the ACLU, told Newsweek. "CBP facilities are notorious for not providing sufficient medical care ."

The ACLU reported that one woman allegedly incurred a vaginal infection while under CBP custody and did not receive clean undergarments for two weeks, despite making several requests.

Another woman, who was pregnant, allegedly experienced profuse vaginal bleeding and requested medical treatment, only to be told "don't be dramatic." She never received medical attention, the ACLU reported.

For those who make it through CBP processing and into the country, nonprofits serve as a critical means of relief, providing asylum seekers with medical care, physical relief, and shelter. Newsweek previously reported on a nonprofit coalition in Arizona that provided COVID-19 testing and shelter to migrants dropped off in the city of Yuma by CBP.

Shaw Drake, a Texas-based staff attorney and policy counsel for border and immigrants' rights at the ACLU, told Newsweek the reliance on NGOs for humanitarian relief is a fixture of the border.

After being processed by CBP, which generally must take no more than 72 hours, Drake said individuals will sometimes spend a few days living in local shelters. During this time, they generally make contact with their connections in the U.S. and make travel arrangements, if they do not already have arrangements made. For those passing through quickly, these groups may provide a much needed meal before they board a Greyhound bus to Chicago.

"Once (migrants are) released from custody, it's all on the NGOs to provide support," Drake told Newsweek. "CBP facilities are notorious for not providing sufficient medical care."

Drake said a collation of nonprofit partners working with the ACLU's Texas office currently possess the capacity to house additional asylum seekers released from CBP custody.

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Biden RETURNS $2billion set aside for Trump's border wall .
The Biden administration is returning $2 billion set aside for Donald Trump's signature border wall and calling on Congress to cancel other funding, despite a surge in people trying to cross illegally. President Joe Biden suspended construction when he took power but his new plan falls short of canceling it altogether.Instead, it ends fast track provisions.'Building a massive wall that spans the entire southern border and costs American taxpayers billions of dollars is not a serious policy solution or responsible use of Federal funds,' said the White House Office of Management and Budget (O.M.B).

usr: 1
This is interesting!