•   
  •   
  •   

US Fact check: No, straightaways weren't required as airstrips in Eisenhower interstate system

21:25  09 june  2021
21:25  09 june  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

FDR is the easy comparison, but Biden is taking a page from Eisenhower's playbook

  FDR is the easy comparison, but Biden is taking a page from Eisenhower's playbook Although both Biden and Eisenhower were selected as centrist candidates within their own parties, they both moved leftward once in office. To be sure, Eisenhower was a reluctant civil rights advocate. He preferred to leave school desegregation to the states to manage and didn't want to interfere with the southern "way of life." But Eisenhower took action in 1957 when Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus deployed the state National Guard to prevent Black students from integrating Central High School in Little Rock.

The claim: U.S. interstates must 'be straight' for one mile out of every five so they could be used as airstrips

a car parked on a city street filled with lots of traffic: Morning traffic moves along Interstate 76 in Philadelphia on March 29, 2021. © Matt Rourke, AP Morning traffic moves along Interstate 76 in Philadelphia on March 29, 2021.

A small plane merged with traffic on I-35 in Minnesota in December 2020, touching down in the westbound lanes before crashing into a vehicle and coming to rest along a highway divider.

Nobody was injured in what the Minnesota State Patrol called a “suspected emergency landing.” Footage of the landing shows the pilot touched down on a straightaway, just before the interstate bends left.

Biden's gamble with Putin in Geneva

  Biden's gamble with Putin in Geneva In 1955, US President Dwight Eisenhower met the leaders of France, the UK and the Soviet Union in Geneva, in a meeting designed to defuse tensions that threatened to pitch the world back into war. In 1985, President Ronald Reagan and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev forged a personal relationship in Geneva that was one of the first steps in ending the Cold War. The picture beamed back to Moscow tomorrow will show the President of the United States treating the President of Russia as an equal. In itself, that's a win for Putin and will cause some Americans to question Biden's game.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

The straightaway, though, wasn’t the product of a little-known aspect of America’s highway development, as a viral Facebook post might lead you to believe.

The June 6 post claims the interstate system “requires that one mile in every five must be straight” so they could be used as airstrips during war or other emergencies. It has been shared more than 4,800 times.

Not so, according to the Federal Highway Administration. The agency has been debunking the claim for decades.

“I will conclude by saying that, for all I know, there are 293 ways to make change for a dollar, snails can sleep for three years without eating, and an ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain,” FHWA historian Richard F. Weingroff wrote in 2000. “BUT NO LAW, REGULATION, POLICY, OR SLIVER OF RED TAPE REQUIRES THAT ONE OUT OF FIVE MILES OF THE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM MUST BE STRAIGHT.”

Fact check: Post misleads on effectiveness of J&J COVID-19 vaccine in older adults

  Fact check: Post misleads on effectiveness of J&J COVID-19 vaccine in older adults A post online from anti-vaccination group Physicians for Informed Consent claims J&J COVID-19 vaccine ineffective in older adults. This is false.Use of the one-dose shot was paused for several weeks but lifted on April 23 after both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found the vaccine was overall safe and effective.

The user who shared the June 6 post on Facebook declined comment.

Highway history

President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highways Act to establish a funding mechanism for a 41,000-mile network of interstates in 1956.

Then-U.S. Commerce Secretary Sinclair Weeks called it “the greatest public-works program in the history of the world.”

However, the “one-out-of-five rule” was not proposed or included in that legislation or any other law, according to Weingroff. Congress had considered including a flight strip program in the 1944 Federal-Aid Highway Act, but it didn’t make it into law.

Weingroff said in his 2000 debunking of the myth that its origins might have been in “a misreading of history,” specifically in a provision of the Defense Highway Act of 1941 that allowed for a flight strip program.

The flight strips were designed for highway access, but not highways themselves, he wrote.

Fact check: Lemon drops and red onions will not cure or prevent COVID-19

  Fact check: Lemon drops and red onions will not cure or prevent COVID-19 Posts online falsely claims lemon drops, rock salt and red onions are effective in preventing or treating the coronavirus.Despite emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of three COVID-19 vaccines, one Facebook post claims consuming red onions and applying natural lemon drops on the nose can be used to curb the virus instead.

“This myth is widespread on the Internet and in reference sources, but has no basis in law, regulation, design manual – or fact.  Airplanes occasionally land on Interstates when no alternative is available in an emergency, not because the Interstates are designed for that purpose,” according to an FHWA myth bust of the claim.

Our ruling: False

The claim that U.S. interstates must “be straight” for one mile out of every five is FALSE, based on our research. The Federal Highway Administration has debunked the viral claim as a “widespread myth,” which says portions of highways must be straight to be used as airstrips during war or other emergencies. No law or agency rule was ever implemented establishing that requirement.

Our fact-check sources:

  • USA TODAY, Dec. 4, 2020, Small plane makes emergency landing on Minnesota highway, hitting a vehicle but avoiding injury
  • Federal Highway Administration, May/June 2000, One Mile in Five: Debunking The Myth
  • Federal Highway Administration, accessed June 8, Richard F. Weingroff Biography
  • Federal Highway Administration, accessed June 8, June 29, 1956: A Day In History - 55th Anniversary of the Interstate Highway System
  • Federal Highway Administration, accessed June 8, Interstate Highway System - The Myths

Thank you for supporting our journalism. You can subscribe to our print edition, ad-free app or electronic newspaper replica here.

Fact check: Video of Biden discussing Jesus, the American Revolution and airports is missing context

  Fact check: Video of Biden discussing Jesus, the American Revolution and airports is missing context A video purports to show Biden making a confusing statement about Jesus, the Revolutionary War and airports. The full video shows it is misleading.One recent meme plucks one sentence from a speech to take aim at Biden's mental prowess.

Our fact check work is supported in part by a grant from Facebook.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fact check: No, straightaways weren't required as airstrips in Eisenhower interstate system

Fact check: Video falsely presents joke as confession to QAnon blood-harvesting conspiracy theory .
A viral video misrepresents a joke by Whitney Cummings as evidence of QAnon-related claims about blood harvesting. Her team confirmed she was kidding.QAnon followers say Hollywood and Washington elites run a secret child sex trafficking ring and harvest children's blood. The conspiracy theory says elites then extract an anti-aging chemical called adrenochrome to maintain their youth.

usr: 8
This is interesting!